Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Community and Culture Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                             Tuesday 11 April 2017

Time:                            1.00 pm

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Community and Culture Committee

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Aaron Hawkins

 

Deputy Chairperson

Rachel Elder

Marie Laufiso

Members

David Benson-Pope

Dave Cull

 

Christine Garey

Doug Hall

 

Mike Lord

Damian Newell

 

Jim O'Malley

Chris Staynes

 

Conrad Stedman

Lee Vandervis

 

Andrew Whiley

Kate Wilson

 

Senior Officer                               Simon Pickford, General Manager Community Services

 

Governance Support Officer      Arlene Goss

 

 

 

Arlene Goss

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Arlene.Goss@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Public Forum                                                                                             4

1.1   Community Event at Stadium                                                                4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5   

Minutes of Committees

5          Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board - 22 February 2017                                  15

6        Grants Subcommittee - 13 March 2017                                                         18   

Part A Reports (Committee  has power to decide these matters)

7          Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities - January to February 2017 21

8        Ara Toi and City of Literature Update Report - July to December 2016                39

9        South Dunedin Hub and Community Liaison                                                    55

10      Community and Culture Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter ended 31 December 2016                                                                                       62

11      Public Art Framework                                                                                71

12      Items for Consideration by the Chair            

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                           118

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

1     Public Forum

1.1  Community Event at Stadium

Shelley Gilchrist wishes to address the meeting concerning a community event at the stadium for the Sophie Elliott Foundation.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Register of Interest as at 5 April 2017

7

  



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11 April 2017

 

 

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Minutes of Committees

Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board - 22 February 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board meeting held on 22 February 2017.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board held on 22 February 2017

16

  



 

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum Board

MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Toitū Otago Settlers Museum Board held in the Otago Settlers Association Board Room, Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, 31 Queens Gardens, Dunedin on Wednesday 22 February 2017, commencing at 9.00 am

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Phil Dowsett

 

Members

Rachel Elder

Doug Hall

 

Aaron Hawkins

Dot Page

 

Susan Schweigman

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Cam McCracken (Dunedin Public Art Gallery Director) and Jennifer Evans (Otago Settlers Museum Director)

 

Governance Support Officer      Pam Jordan

 

 

 

 

1       Apologies

There were no apologies.

 

2       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Mr Phil Dowsett/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Committee:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration.

 

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/001)

 

 

3       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Rachel Elder):

That the Committee:

 

a)     Notes the Elected or Independent Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A of the report; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected or Independent Members' Interests.

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/002)

 

Reports

4       Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Activity Report

 

A report covered the activities of Toitū Otago Settlers Museum (TOSM) for the period 1 November – 31 December 2016.

 

The Otago Settlers Museum Director commented on each of the items in the report and responded to questions from Committee members.  Matters discussed included increased attendance, budgets, the success of various events, interns being employed over the holiday period, and Trip Advisor reviews.  Arrangements would also be made for Board members to observe the accessioning process at the Museum.

 

Comment was made on the re-establishment of links with the Fire Brigade Restoration Society.  Cr Hall advised that he donated the use of a building free of charge to the group and they were also carrying out a restoration task for him on a commercial arrangement, but he did not consider that there was a conflict of interest.

 

 

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Committee:

 

a)     Notes the Toitū Otago Settlers Museum Activity Report.

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/003)

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 9.50 am.

 

 

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

   

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Grants Subcommittee - 13 March 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the public part of the minutes of the Grants Subcommittee meeting held on 13 March 2017.

b)     Takes Part C items of the minutes of the Grants Subcommittee held on Monday, 13 March 2017, in the non-public part of the meeting.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Grants Subcommittee held on 13 March 2017

19

  



 

Grants Subcommittee

MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Grants Subcommittee held in the Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin on Monday 13 March 2017, commencing at 10.00 am

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Aaron Hawkins

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Whiley

 

Members

Christine Garey

 

 

Kate Wilson

 

 

Dave Cull (ex officio member)

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Joy Gunn (Events and Community Development Manager), Paul Coffey (Senior Community Advisor), Cara Paterson (Community Advisor – Arts) and Sandy Graham (General Manager Strategy and Governance).

 

Governance Support Officer      Arlene Goss

 

 

 

1       Public Forum

There was no public forum.  

 

2       Apologies

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Kate Wilson):

 

That the Grants Subcommittee accepts an apology from Cr Marie Laufiso.

 

Motion carried

 

 

3       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Kate Wilson):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration.

 

Motion carried

 

 

4       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

There were no new declarations of interest.                    

 

Resolution to exclude the public

Moved (Cr Kate Wilson/Cr Aaron Hawkins):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, exclude the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Selection of Community Representatives for Grants Subcommittee

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

The meeting includes the discussion of individual applicants for positions on the subcommittee.

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.

 

Motion carried

 

 

 

  


Part A Reports

 

Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities - January to February 2017

Department: Corporate

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1      The attached report, prepared by Otago Museum, provides an update on the key activities from January to February 2017.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Community and Culture Committee:

a)     Notes the Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities – January to February 2017.

 

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Cindy Ashley - Personal Assistant to General Manager

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities - January to February 2017

23

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing local infrastructure and a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective by monitoring activity.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts on tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no known implications, as funding this activity is provided for in the LTP.

Financial considerations

No financial information presented.

Significance

Significance has been assessed as low in terms of Council's Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no known implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

Ara Toi and City of Literature Update Report - July to December 2016

Department: Services and Development

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of the report is to provide an update to Council on the activities and achievements of Ara Toi and the City of Literature for the period from July to December 2016.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Ara Toi and City of Literature Update July-December 2016.

 

 

BACKGROUND

2      Ara Toi Otepoti: Our Creative Future: Dunedin’s Arts and Culture Strategy was adopted by Council in May 2015, with a total of $245,000 provided in the 2016/17 Annual Plan for implementation. Ara Toi Otepoti is one of the eight key strategies that together make up the city’s Strategic Framework. Ara Toi has strong connections with the 2013-23 Economic Development and Social Wellbeing Strategies.

3      Ara Toi was developed in partnership with the community arts collective Transforming Dunedin and included extensive community consultation.

4      Ara Toi provides a framework and a direction for the development of arts and culture within Dunedin to realise the vision that ‘Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities with arts and culture at its core’.

5      The four key strategic themes of Ara Toi are Identity Pride, Creative Economy, Access and Inclusion, and Inspired Connections. These themes collectively provide a focus for Dunedin to celebrate its creativity, to support the city’s creative sector, to enhance Dunedin’s place as a compelling destination, to include the whole community in creative activity and to connect with creative communities across New Zealand and internationally. An overview of the strategic themes comprising Ara Toi is included as Attachment A.

DISCUSSION

6      The work programmes for Ara Toi and the City of Literature during 2016/17 build on the foundations laid in 2015/16. A detailed list of activities and achievements during the period July to December 2016 is included as Attachment B.

7      The City of Literature designation and activities are aligned with and exemplify the Ara Toi strategic themes of Inspired Connections (Networked Winner, Ambitious Partner) and Creative Economy (Promote and Profile, World Class Player).

8      Council approved a budget of $135,000 in the 2016/17 Annual Plan for the implementation of the City of Literature designation.

9      The initial focus for the City of Literature has been to develop and strengthen networks at a local, national and international level, and to engage with the community and collaborate on projects while initiating and progressing a range of initiatives such as the poems on parking meter tickets, the establishment of a Writers Recognition Working Group, partnering with the Otago Daily Times on a fictionalised short story series and the development of a funding submission to the New Zealand National Commission for UNESCO to host an international Creative Cities Symposium in Dunedin in late 2017.

OPTIONS

10    There are no options as the report is for information only.

NEXT STEPS

11    A detailed work plan for the implementation of Ara Toi Otepoti has been developed by staff and has been endorsed by the Creative Dunedin Partnership. The work plan aligns activities proposed for 2016/17 with Ara Toi strategic themes and identifies opportunities to strengthen and develop local and national partnerships.

12    Key elements of this work plan include continuing the Urban Dream Brokerage; to research an audience development partnership model for Dunedin; developing a strategic plan for Council funding of arts and culture including access to spaces and sustainable business models and continuing the Dunedin Boosted Ambassador, Art Ache, Co.Starters, Business Vitality and Bring it Home projects.

13    Work is also underway to develop a policy, process and guidelines for arts and above ground infrastructure, and this work will come to Council later in the year.

14    There are also a number of identified actions that deliver on Ara Toi that are embedded within departmental operational activities and budgets including:

·      Develop and regularly update an arts and culture image library (DCC Marketing, City Marketing/Enterprise, Arts and Culture Group, Community Development)

·      Creative sector input into development of the Destination Plan, building on delivery of the Creative City domestic campaign (Enterprise and Community Development)

·      Creative sector input into development of the City Centre Plan (Planning, Enterprise, Community Development)

·      Programmes of the cultural institutions (Arts and Culture Group)

15    Longer term ideas that were identified in the public consultation on Ara Toi but have not been prioritised at this point, but will be considered for 2017/18 include:

·      Developing a digital incubator for young people, making use of the links to the GigCity Living Hub

·      Suburban and rural touring of local content

16    A strategic plan for the Dunedin City of Literature is also under development and will be consulted with key stakeholders during 2016/17

 

Signatories

Author:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Ara Toi - Key Strategic Themes

44

b

Ara Toi Otepoti and City of Literature - Key Activities and Achievements - July to December 2016

46

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Ara Toi

Ara Toi is one of the eight key strategies in the strategic framework, and works in synergy with the other city strategies. The initial arts and culture actions can be expected to drive economic success and contribute to better social outcomes for the city.

 

City of Literature

The City of Literature supports activities that contribute to the four themes of Ara Toi and also supports other key strategies including the Social Wellbeing Strategy in promoting ‘Connected People’ and “Vibrant and Cohesive Communities’; the Economic Development Strategy by providing activities that support ‘Business vitality’, ‘Alliances for innovation’, ‘Linkages beyond our borders’ and ‘A compelling destination’.

Māori Impact Statement

Ara Toi

Ngai Tahu has been closely linked to the development of Ara Toi. Kai Tahu views will be represented during implementation through membership of the Creative Dunedin Partnership.

City of Literature

The fundamental contribution of tangata whenua to the culture of Dunedin has been recognised in the submission for Dunedin to be designated as a UNESCO City of Literature.

Sustainability

Ara Toi

The implementation of Ara Toi supports more sustainable local economic development.

 

City of Literature

The City of Literature is expected to contribute to increased cultural tourism and more sustainable local economic activity

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The 2016/17 Annual Plan includes funding for Ara Toi ($245,000) and the City of Literature ($135,000)

Financial considerations

This report is for information only and there are no financial implications

Significance

The information in this report has been assessed under the Council's Significance and Engagement policy as being of low significance.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in the development of this report. The activities undertaken in the implementation of Ara Toi and the City of Literature have involved engagement with a broad range of external stakeholders and partners..

Engagement - internal

Council staff in the Enterprise Dunedin Group, Community and Planning Group and the Arts and Culture Group have provided input for this report

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified legal or health and safety risks related to the information in this report.

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest have been identified regarding the information in this report.

Community Boards

Community Boards will be involved where Ara Toi and City of Literature projects are implemented in their area.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

ARA TOI OTEPOTI

 

Ara Toi Otepoti: Our Creative Future: Dunedin’s arts and culture strategy is a community strategy developed in partnership with the community arts collective Transforming Dunedin. Ara Toi provides a framework and direction for the development of arts and culture in Dunedin to realise the vision for Dunedin as one of the world’s great small cities.

 

KEY STRATEGIC THEMES

 

IDENTITY PRIDE

 

·    Stand Up, Stand Out

Be confident in Dunedin’s distinct culture and creative thinking

·    Kāi Tahu Taonga

Treasure the place of Kāi Tahu in the arts and culture landscape and invest for the future

·    Creative Creature

Embed a creative perspective in all Dunedin’s decision-making and action

·    Spaces To Skite About

Foster a creative physical environment, chock full of exciting public art, festivals and events

 

CREATIVE ECONOMY

 

·    Growth Driver

Leverage arts and culture as a key driver of local and regional economic development

·    Promote and Profile

Use the city’s creative excellence to build dynamic and productive relationships nationally and around the world

·    Talent Incubator

Be a city where great creative people train, work, set up businesses and have fantastic careers

·    World Class Player

Ensure the best arts and culture from around the world is available on our doorstep.

 

ACCESS AND INCLUSION

 

·    Open Access

Invest in providing arts and culture so everyone can participate, giving people opportunities to dream while boosting wellbeing and success

·    Hunger for the Edge

Take risks and bravely champion artistic experimentation that pushes boundaries

·    For The Love of It

Value the desire to make and create for its own sake, and support diverse expression

 

INSPIRED CONNECTIONS

 

·    Networked Winner

Capitalise on the city’s connected creative communities

·    Ambitious Partner

Facilitate public, private and creative sector partnerships to conceive and deliver magnificent projects here and internationally

 

 

·    Studio Innovator

Embed multi-disciplinary approaches to generate fresh thinking, creative solutions and imaginative outcomes

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Ara Toi Otepoti and City of Literature – Key Activities and Achievements – July to December 2016

An overview of budget expenditure and activities undertaken as part of the implementation of Ara Toi Otepoti and the City of Literature during the period July to December 2016 are detailed below.

Ara Toi Otepoti - Budget

1      A summary of the budget and actual expenditure on Ara Toi during the period July to December 2016 is as follows:

 

Investment 2016/17

 

 

Budget

$000

 

 

Actual

$000

 

Variance

$000

 

Comments

Ara Toi (Community Arts)

 

Staff costs

 

Project & admin costs

 

Sub Total

 

 

 

$81

 

$100

 

$181

 

 

$39

 

$27

 

$66

 

 

$42

 

$73

 

$115

 

 

Full year staff costs expenditure on track

 

Project expenditure under budget to date. See detailed comments below.

Ara Toi (Enterprise Dunedin)

 

Staff costs

 

Project costs

 

Sub Total

 

 

 

$49

 

$15

 

$64

 

 

$21

 

$0

 

$21

 

 

$28

 

$15

 

$43

 

 

Full year staff costs expenditure on track

 

Project costs will be incurred in Q3 & Q4. See detailed comments below.

 

TOTAL

 

 

$245

 

$87

 

$158

 

 

 

 

2      Ara Toi project expenditure within Community Arts is under budget expectation due to:

·           Funds accrued from the 2015/16 budget for Making Tracks grants have not been fully expended as some of the groups have decided not to move forward with their projects. Expenditure required for Making Tracks in 2017/18 is being reconsidered.

·           Expenditure for the Urban Dream Brokerage is under budget due to the timing of invoices, but expected to be fully spent by year end.

·           Expenditure on audience development and access to spaces work is under forecast budget as staff have been exploring strategic options to a wider sector approach, but are expected to be fully spent by year end.

·           Expenditure for the Joy & Jeopardy funding hui is on track with another hui planned before year end.

3      While there has been no Ara Toi project expenditure within Enterprise Dunedin to December 2016, a total of $3,000 has been spent in Q3 with $500 to be paid in March 2016 to Art Ache to test a model for visual art sales and audience development as part of the Dunedin Fringe Festival.

4      In addition, $5,000 for Vocational Pathways/Insiders Dunedin has been allocated to support the Yu Garden project, which will develop a catalogue and website which will include case studies for future teaching in secondary schools and Insiders.

 

 

Ara Toi Otepoti - Activities

Key Ara Toi activities and achievements during the period July to December 2016 include:

Public Art Framework

5      The public consultation on the development of Ara Toi identified the development of a public art framework for Dunedin as a priority action. Council approved a draft framework for Public Art in Dunedin for public engagement in December 2016. 

6      The Public Art Framework originates from, and is underpinned by the strategic framework and vision for the arts in Dunedin presented in Ara Toi Otepoti.

Art and Creativity in Infrastructure

 

7      Staff are developing a policy and toolkit with input from Council Infrastructure teams. The purpose of the policy and toolkit is to enable departments to assess and develop proposals to integrate original art or creativity in relevant DCC infrastructure projects.

8      Professor Francis Whitehead (University of Chicago) presented a seminar to DCC staff in October 2016 about the theory and practice of how artists and creatives can participate in infrastructure projects. The seminar included staff from Arts and Culture, Community Development, Enterprise Dunedin, Parks, Transport and Water and Waste.  A number of creative projects are underway within Infrastructure teams such as the 3D Crossings at the University, and the City Residential Recycling Facilities in the Warehouse Precinct and Moray Place.

9      The Public Art Framework and the Art and Creativity in Infrastructure Policy complement each other and are expected to have some shared outcomes, such as the inclusion of public art in infrastructure projects.

Urban Dream Brokerage Dunedin (http://urbandreambrokerage.org.nz/dunedin/)

10    The use of vacant commercial space to promote arts and culture was identified as a priority during the development of Ara Toi. Based on its success in Wellington, a pilot Dunedin franchise of the Urban Dream Brokerage (UDB) was established in October 2015, and a part-time broker employed.

11    Since launching the franchise, UDB has funded 13 projects; 10 projects have been delivered including 2 GigCity commissions in partnership with Chorus. UDB has received 34 applications, as well as 9 proposals for GigCity commissions.

12    Urban Dream Brokerage has placed 10 projects at 7 sites, in collaboration with 5 property owners. It is estimated that over 5,000 people have actively engaged, participated and interacted with projects so far. As a result, Dunedin's CBD has enjoyed at least 150 days of activated vacant space.

13    Over 20 artists have been supported by our Dunedin Broker to realise their projects. All received invaluable insight and experience presenting their work in an alternative, public focussed way.

Bring It Home (http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/services/dcc-funding/bring-it-home)

14    Bring It Home is a DCC initiative to promote music and film in Dunedin, working in partnership with New Zealand On Air's New Music funding programme. New Music supports artists with grants of up to $10,000 to produce a song and music video, and promote them to audiences. Bring It Home offers a top up of up to $2,000 if the artist films their music video using Dunedin locations, or uses Dunedin creatives.

15    French For Rabbits completed the first Bring It Home supported project "The Weight of Melted Snow" in October 2016. It is being released in March 2017.

 

Dunedin Boosted Ambassador (http://www.boosted.org.nz)

16    Boosted provides an online platform for artists and arts organisations to crowdfund their projects, supported by The Arts Foundation. Using Boosted, artists build their networks, increase financial support for their projects and promote themselves to new and unexplored audiences.

17    DCC is supporting a Dunedin Boosted Ambassador to advise and coach artists on crowdfunding their projects using Boosted. Workshops have been delivered to 253 participants.

18    Between July and December 2016, 17 projects have been supported through Boosted, with a total of 55,771 social media postings for Dunedin campaigns. All 15 activated projects have achieved their fundraising targets, raising a total of $43,112. The 2 remaining projects are in development.

19    Dunedin has the best success rate for Boosted projects in the country, and is supporting more projects by visual artists than the national average.

Mayfair Theatre Fundraising and Organisational Development Plan

 

20    The Community Arts Advisor has coordinated a project to assist the Mayfair Theatre to develop a fundraising and organisational development plan to meet its operational and capital needs. Irene Mosley of Results Consulting was contracted to develop this plan, working with Mayfair Theatre staff, trustees, users and stakeholders.  Irene completed work with the theatre in November 2016.

21    The Theatre's new business plan focuses on growing the theatre business, and fundraising for capital needs. The plan provides a road map to develop theatre operations, with or without capital development. As a result, the Mayfair was awarded a Lottery Community Facilities grant of $26,190 in December 2016. This will assess what capital development can go ahead.

22    Based on the success of this project, staff are exploring collaboration with other funders to address the needs of more arts organisations.

Funding Advice

23    Between July and December 2016, the Community Arts Advisors have provided support to around three hundred artists and arts organisations, including their portfolios of City Service and City Project clients, as well as clients who are seeking or have received Community Arts funding.

24    Before the DCC community funding round in September 2016, staff rewrote the application forms in plain English to make them more accessible.

Joy and Jeopardy Arts Hui

25    In partnership with Otago Community Trust and Dunedin Fringe Festival, the Dunedin City Council supported an arts funding hui on Saturday 27 August 2016 to help Dunedin’s creative communities to seek and secure funding from a range of sources. Over 85 creatives attended this hui.

26    As a result of the August 2016 hui, the Council received the most arts applications ever to its community funding round in September 2016. DCC funded new work that strengthens partnerships and collaborations such as Urban Dream Brokerage, the Dunedin Fringe Festival, Puaka Matariki, the City of Literature and Arts on the Rail Trail.

27    A second Joy and Jeopardy Hui is planned for June 2017 again partnering with Otago Community Trust and Dunedin Fringe Festival, and focusing on sponsorship and budgeting.

 

Central City Arts Hub

28    The Dunedin City Council has supported the establishment of a central city hub for the creative community by enabling a lease agreement for the Dunedin Fringe Festival to be located in the former i-Site adjacent to the Community Gallery on Princes Street. The Dunedin Fringe Festival shares the space with other organisations such as the New Zealand Young Writers Festival, the New Zealand International Early Music Festival, Urban Dream Brokerage Dunedin. Staff delivered 1:1 arts funding advice sessions from the Fringe Office in September 2016.

Arts and Culture What’s On Information

29    Improvements have been made to the Dunedinnz.com website to increase the visibility and profile of city events, including arts and culture activity. Enterprise Dunedin and the Events and Community Development Team are working with Marketing and Communications staff on further improvements, using a communications plan for Ara Toi developed by staff in December 2016.

Vocational Pathways

30    The Ara Toi Project Coordinator has been working with the Otago Polytechnic and Otago University Humanities Division on the development and delivery of NCEA unit standards to support students to attain Creative Industries Vocational Awards. The purpose of this project is to support students to identify career pathways (including tertiary training, start-up and business development) in the creative sector.

Creative Tourism

31    The Ara Toi Project Coordinator has been facilitating a project to support working artists, the creative and visitor hosting sectors in Dunedin. The intention is to develop these services and work with the arts sector to host studio visits, tours and workshops.

32    To date, two new permanent businesses and two bespoke services have launched, a further business based on Night Sky Photography plans to launch for winter.

Art Ache

33    Arte Ache is a project designed to increase audience numbers at events and increase sales for visual artists, it also links Dunedin artists to Auckland markets via social media. Arte Ache Dunedin is based on a highly successful Auckland model and will be rolled out at the 2017 Dunedin Fringe Festival.

Film Dunedin

34    The Ara Toi Project Coordinator also manages a Regional Film Office for Dunedin through Enterprise Dunedin. Since September 2016, the Project Coordinator has responded to 10 significant enquiries regarding locations and shooting feature films in Dunedin. He has advised and processed 15 permit requests from television and film projects shooting in Dunedin. He has provided support and advice to three local film makers. This activity has been supported through the Grow Dunedin Partners for the 2016/17 year.

                    Description: E:\Further Images Watermarked November 2016\Karitane 01 Watermarked.jpg

Example of Image Provided Locations Scout for Feature Movie.

China Film Festival

35    The Ara Toi Project Coordinator is working with New Zealand Film Commission, MFAT in Shanghai and Shanghai Art Film Festival to present the inaugural China Film Festival in New Zealand at the Regent Theatre from 31 March to 2 April 2017. Six new release feature films will be screened.

36    The Festival also includes a delegation of film and television industry representatives and investors from Shanghai who will meet Dunedin film and television producers. MFAT are also sponsoring two journalists to spend a week in Dunedin during the Festival to report on the strengths of the Dunedin/Shanghai Sister City relationship.

Anything Could Happen – Exhibition of Dunedin Art and Fashion – Shanghai May 2017

37    The Ara Toi Project Coordinator is working with staff from Otago Polytechnic Fashion and Art Schools to send an exhibition of Dunedin Art and Fashion to Yu Gallery in Shanghai for the month of May 2017. The project will facilitate export opportunities for Dunedin artists and designers, promote education and training in Dunedin, represent Dunedin as a creative city and provide a platform for other Dunedin businesses and organisations to host events in Shanghai.

Strategic Plan for Council Funding for Arts and Culture

38    A strategic plan for the Dunedin City Council funding of arts and culture is being supported by mapping direct investment in arts and culture across all Council departments. The Ara Toi communications plan establishes timelines for communicating how DCC invests in arts and culture, funding opportunities for artists, and progress on the strategy itself. DCC established baselines and trends for progress of the strategy in December 2016. Two new measures require development in 2017.

 

 

 

 

Performance Measures for Arts and Culture

HIGH-LEVEL INDICATORS

 

76% of Dunedin residents consider Dunedin a creative city, up from 69% in 2015

 

Source: 2015 and 2016 Residents Opinion Surveys

 

 

1,334 people were employed in the creative sector in 2015, down slightly from 2014

 

Source: 2014 and 2015 BERL Economic Overview Report

IDENTITY PRIDE

ACCESS AND INCLUSION

INSPIRED CONNECTIONS

CREATIVE ECONOMY

76% of Dunedin residents consider Dunedin has a culturally rich and diverse arts scene, up from 69% in 2014.

 

Source: 2014 and 2016 Quality of Life Surveys

89% of Dunedin residents are satisfied with the city’s cultural institutions, down slightly from 91% in 2015.

 

 

73% of Dunedin residents are satisfied with the DCC’s support for events and festivals.

 

Source: 2015 and 2016 Residents Opinion Surveys

 

Visitors to cultural institutions

 

1.2 million Dunedin Public Libraries

 

226,700 Dunedin Public Art Gallery

 

304,600 Toitu Otago Settlers Museum

 

43,600 Dunedin Chinese Gardens

 

Source: DCC reports, year to June 2016

 

Value of community and creative community grants for arts and culture (new measure)

 

Qualitative data on the extent to which arts and cultural opportunities are leveraged through networking and partnerships (new measure)

$94m was generated by the creative sector in 2015, up slightly from 2014.

 

1.6% of Dunedin’s GDP was from the creative sector.

 

2.6% of Dunedin jobs in 2015 were in the creative sector.

 

Source: BERL 2015 Dunedin Economic Profile

 

 

Assessing Opportunities for Children and Young People

39    Council staff are supporting the Dunedin Youth Council to consult with young people on their arts and culture experiences and needs.

Creative Dunedin Partnership

40    The Creative Dunedin Partnership met in August and December 2016 to oversee delivery of Ara Toi. Chaired by Cr Aaron Hawkins, it includes representation from Kai Tahu, Transforming Dunedin, the Otago Polytechnic, the University of Otago and the Dunedin City Council as well as the health, social and creative sectors. Recruitment of a business representative is planned. Representatives from the University of Otago and Dunedin cultural institutions stood down in December 2016 and are being replaced.

41    To meet a Creative New Zealand governance requirement, two members of the Creative Dunedin Partnership will join the DCC Grants Subcommittee to decide the Creative New Zealand Creative Communities funding from May 2017.

City of Literature - Budget

42    A summary of the budget and actual expenditure for the City of Literature for the period July to December 2016 is as follows:

 

Investment 2016/17

 

 

Budget

$000

 

 

Actual

$000

 

Variance

$000

 

Comments

City of Literature

 

Staff costs

 

Project costs

 

 

 

$85

 

$50

 

 

$39

 

$9

 

 

 

$46

 

$41

 

 

 

 

 

Project funds primarily to be spent in Q3 & Q4

 

TOTAL

 

 

$135

 

$48

 

$87

 

 

 

City of Literature - Activities

43    Key City of Literature activities and achievements during the period July to December 2016 include:

Emerging Writers Residency

44    An annual Emerging Writer’s Residency has commenced at Otago University Book Shop in partnership with the Robert Lord Writers’ Cottage Trust.

International Profile for Dunedin Authors

45    Dunedin poet Peter Olds was celebrated in an exhibition of words and images from UNESCO Cities of Literature at the 2016 Reykjavík Reads Festival in Iceland.

46    Diane Brown’s poem ‘Smaill’s Beach’ travelled around on buses in Estonia.

City of Literature Cookbook

47    Dunedin is producing a Cities of Literature digital cookbook, which will showcase recipes and images with a literary flavour and which will ultimately be circulated to all 116 UNESCO Creative Cities. The digital cookbook is close to completion.

Serialised fictional short stories – Partnership with the Otago Daily Times

48    In association with the City of Literature, the Otago Daily Times ran three serialised fictional short stories of about 4,500 words in total. The stories were published over three weeks in the Saturday edition of the newspaper, with instalments comprising approximately 1,500 words each week.

Recognition of Writers Working Group

49    A working group of Council and literary community representatives has been convened by the Director City of Literature to identify, explore and recommend a range of possible strategies for recognising significant Dunedin writers past and present, and as well as places of literary significance in the city. The working group will report in May 2017 on strategies recognise Dunedin writers past and present, along with criteria and international examples.

50    A new Octagon Writers’ Walk plaque recognising Dunedin playwright Robert Lord will be unveiled in May 2017 during the Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival. The plaque has been funded by the Robert Lord Writers’ Cottage Trust and devised in liaison with the Trust.

One City One Book

51    In partnership with the Otago/Southland Branch of the New Zealand Society of Authors, a One City One Book initiative is currently being developed. The initiative will encourage everyone in Dunedin to read the same book over one month in 2017. The title to be promoted is currently being shortlisted.

UNESCO Creative Cities Symposium Submission

52    Planning has commenced for an international Creative Cities Symposium to be held in Dunedin at the end of November 2017, supported by a grant of $20,000 from the New Zealand National Commission for UNESCO and the University of Otago Centre for the Book. The Symposium will invited keynote speakers from selected UNESCO Creative Cities across the seven themes, as well as individuals and representatives of local and national creative sectors and organisations.

Literary Walking Tours

53    Literary Walking Tours have been developed and launched for the story-rich University of Otago campus by local writer Beverly Martens.

Centre for the Book Symposium

54    This annual Centre for the Book Symposium was held during the period 27-29 October 2016 with the theme of Book and Place, selected in part to showcase the City of Literature.

Otago Access Radio Youth Poetry Podcasts

 

55    Otago Access Radio Youth Zone is partnering with the City of Literature and the Dunedin City Library to record young poets over twenty weeks discussing their work and reading original poems.

Dunedin Authors Highlighted in Library Catalogue

56    Dunedin Public Libraries’ Cataloguing team has stickered over 1,500 titles with a strong connection to Dunedin, which can be searched and filtered in the online catalogue under the new City of Literature heading.

University of Otago City of Literature PhD Scholarship

57    The University of Otago has initiated an annual City of Literature PhD Scholarship.

Channel 39 City of Literature Documentary

58    Dunedin Television Channel 39 has filmed a screened a two-part documentary on the Dunedin City of Literature.


 

Dunedin Wins Booth at Bologna International Children’s Book Fair

59    In competition with all 116 UNESCO Creative Cities, Dunedin successfully bid for a complimentary booth at the Bologna International Children’s Book Fair to be held in April 2017. The Dunedin booth will be staffed by Frances Plumpton, a New Zealand literary agent with children’s book publishing and samples provided by a range of New Zealand publishers and children’s authors. This is an unprecedented opportunity to profile Dunedin and New Zealand children’s authors and their works to an international audience. The opportunity has also attracted interest from the New Zealand Book Council, Booksellers New Zealand, Academy of New Zealand Literature and the Publishers Association of New Zealand.


 

South Dunedin Hub and Community Liaison

Department: Community and Planning and Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to update the Committee on progress on establishing a temporary (pop up) hub in the South Dunedin area; and to provide an update on engagement with the South Dunedin Stakeholder Group.

2      Following extensive discussions with agents and property owners in the area, a lease is about to be signed on a suitable property for the South Dunedin pop up hub. It is expected negotiations will be completed by the end of March 2017. Staff expect a temporary hub will be operating within South Dunedin by the end of June 2017 at the latest.

3      Staff have also been continuing to work with the South Dunedin Stakeholder Group. The group is planning a variety of community engagement activities over the coming months to identify the areas of social and economic wellbeing that the Greater South Dunedin community see as priorities, and supporting the community to find ways to address these. Better understanding of climate change and its impact on the South Dunedin environment is already identified as a priority, along with community response planning for adverse events.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the progress on establishing the South Dunedin Hub and working with key community stakeholders.

 

 

BACKGROUND                                                                          

South Dunedin Hub

4      Funding for development of a South Dunedin Community Hub and Library has been allocated in the 2018/19 Annual Plan. In August 2016 feedback was sought from the South Dunedin community on seven potential sites for the permanent Community Hub and Library as part of a longer term plan of engagement with the community. The community was asked to consider their preferred option and provide feedback on the types of services they want available at the permanent Community Hub and Library. 

5      A report was provided to Council in September 2016 detailing the feedback received.  Council requested that staff continue negotiation with the owners of the recommended option. The recommended option is a multi-site hub with a community and library facility on King Edward Street linked to community facilities next to the Gasworks. There has been no further progress on the location of the permanent Hub facility to date.

 

Pop Up Hub

6      The Council asked staff to investigate establishment of a “pop-up” Hub to provide a community facility while the permanent hub is being developed. The purpose of the pop up Hub is threefold:

·           To provide a means of “testing” services with the community and confirm service priorities

·           To gather information and preferences from the community for the design of the main Hub as well as a profile of potential users of the Hub within the community

·           To continue engagement with the community on issues of importance to them and to demonstrate Council’s ongoing commitment to the South Dunedin area. 

7      It is proposed that the pop up hub is open for 25 hours per week, operated by Libraries’ staff who can provide a customer service centre and library services as already offered. In addition, the hub will have computers and wifi for free public Internet access. The Council’s Place Based Community Advisor will work from the hub during part of the week, and a ‘Hot Desk’ will be provided for community groups to utilise.

8      Staff assessed a number of properties within the central area of South Dunedin as potential locations for the pop up hub. However these were all unsuitable by virtue of size, seismic risk or location. The most suitable is a property on Hillside Road, close to the intersection with King Edward Street. Staff are currently negotiating a lease for this property. If negotiations are successful, it is planned that the hub will be open in the coming 6-8 weeks. 

9      Funding for the establishment of the pop up hub, and operational costs from opening to 30 June 2017, will be covered from the allocation in the 2016/17 Libraries budget for community consultation on the South Dunedin Community Hub. A proposal for carry forward of the unexpended 2016/17 budget will be prepared.

TSouth Dunedin Stakeholder Group

10    Community Development staff are working with organisations in the South Dunedin community to address some of the community’s wider social and economic issues.

11    In July 2016, Community Development staff were asked to support engagement with the South Dunedin community as a follow up from the 2015 flood. Staff met with more than 20 organisations (community and government) individually to gather information on what issues, if any, still existed for people following the floods.  From this work it was apparent a small group of people were still dealing with flood-related housing issues.  Of wider concern, however, was that the floods had exacerbated many of the unresolved and ongoing issues for people and families – poverty and lack of insurance; absentee landlords failing to repair / insulate old, cold homes; higher unemployment than other areas; an increase in people with anxiety and health issues; and a belief that living in homes which were not healthy was acceptable.  There was also a general perception that Council did not care about the South Dunedin community.

12    Following these meetings and a small survey with mainly community providers, staff met with more than 25 community and government organisations to discuss the short and longer term social issues within the South Dunedin community.  Council was requested to take a leadership role in coordinating collaborative initiatives within the community and to improve its communication with the community. 

13    In August/September 2016 Council worked jointly with the Otago Regional Council (ORC) to convene a series of information sessions on the Otago Regional Council’s report on the impact of climate change on South Dunedin.  Seventeen information sessions were held for around 400 people.

14    In November 2016, Council staff invited community and government organisations to meet to consider establishing a collaborative network to support community resilience, information sharing and connection. More than 30 people attended this meeting, and formed the South Dunedin Stakeholder Group. Their purpose is to “work collaboratively to support the economic and social wellbeing, of the Greater South Dunedin community. This work includes but is not limited to environmental change.”

15    The South Dunedin Stakeholder Group comprises people who both work and live within the South Dunedin community, and since November its reach has expanded to 50 plus organisations (see attachment A). Some organisations have identified an interest in the work of the group, while other groups and individuals take an active role. The Community Development team is providing a coordination and secretariat role for the group.

16    The Stakeholder group has connected with the South Dunedin Action Group, although the Action Group has chosen not to be represented at South Dunedin Stakeholder Group meetings to date. The South Dunedin Stakeholder Group met in December and late January and has agreed to meet six weekly throughout 2017.

17    The Group has identified three priority areas for collaborative action:

·      Social Wellbeing – Creating more strongly connected communities within the community, and supporting community resilience – food, financial, emotional and health and wellbeing

·      Economic Wellbeing – Increasing economic resilience, and increasing awareness of interdependence (financial & other) of businesses and residents

·      Adaption to Environmental Change – Preparedness for adverse events, and raising awareness and understanding of the changing environment within South Dunedin and its potential impacts on daily life

18    The South Dunedin Stakeholder Group will confirm these priorities with the wider community during the coming months, through a variety of engagements.  It is hoped this engagement will lead to a community owned social and economic wellbeing plan.

19    The South Dunedin Stakeholder Group has been an initiator of the new South Dunedin newsletter, The Lowdown. The South Dunedin Business Association, which is a member of the South Dunedin Stakeholder Group, has offered the website (www.southdunedin.org.nz) as a key communication with and for the community.

OPTIONS

20    There are no options as this is an update report. 

NEXT STEPS

21    If negotiations of the preferred site for the pop up hub are successful, the project team will work with the South Dunedin Stakeholders to plan the set up and launch. There will be an artist embedded within the project team as a pilot for integrating art into infrastructure. Staff will provide a progress report on the work with stakeholders in July 2017.

 

Signatories

Author:

Joy Gunn - Manager Events and Community Development

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Authoriser:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

List of Organisations Comprising South Dunedin Stakeholder Group

61

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Both the hub and stakeholder groups are key to the future social wellbeing of the South Dunedin Community.

Māori Impact Statement

Runaka representatives have been invited to contribute to the South Dunedin Stakeholders Group.

Sustainability

Continued engagement with the community will have long term, positive social, economic and environmental outcomes.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

In the current annual plan, the establishment of the South Dunedin Community Hub is scheduled for development in 2017/18 and 2018/19.

Financial considerations

Funding for the establishment of the pop up hub, and operational costs from opening to 30 June 2017, will be covered from the allocation in the 2016/17 Libraries budget for community consultation on the South Dunedin Community Hub. A proposal for carry forward of the unexpended 2016/17 budget will be prepared.

Significance

The decision to create a pop up hub in South Dunedin and to continue engaging with this community is considered medium in terms of the Significance and Engagement Policy. There is a significant degree of community interest.

Engagement – external

External engagement is already occurring with organisations listed in Attachment A.

Engagement – internal

All Council activities are updated via the Cross Council info sharing group.  The hub is collaboration between Libraries, Community Development, Property and Policy teams.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

No major risks in continuing to support both projects. Council’s legal advisor is providing advice regarding the lease for the temporary ‘pop up’ hub and overseeing due diligence on the property.

Conflict of Interest

No known conflicts of interest have been identified.

Community Boards

There are no identified implications for Community Boards

 

 


List of Organisations that make up the Stakeholder Group

 

Age Concern Otago

Ministry of Education

Anglican Family Care

MP Clare Curran

Aurora Health Centre

Ministry of Social Development

Catholic Church

MSD Work & Income

Catholic Social Services

Otago Community Trust

Chamber of Commerce

Otago Neighbourhood Support Charitable Trust

Civil Defence (Emergency Management Otago)

Otago Pacific People's Health Trust

Community Law

Otakou Runaka

Connect South

Plunket

Connect South

Presbyterian Support Otago

Corstorphine Baptist Community Trust

Public Health South

Department of Internal Affairs

Red Cross

Disabled Persons Assembly

South Dunedin Business Association

Dunedin City Council

South Dunedin Community Trust (formerly South Dunedin Action Group)

Dunedin Community Care Trust

South Dn Neighbourhood Policing Team

Dunedin Secondary Schools Partnership

Methodist Mission Southern

Dunedin South Medical Centre

Rock Solid

Enterprise Dunedin

Pacific Trust Otago

Enviroschools

Dunedin Training Centre

Grey Power Otago

Idea Services

Housing New Zealand Corporation

Centre for Sustainability

Kindergarten Association

Otago Regional Council

KTKO Ltd

Te Kāika Wellbeing Hub

Arai Te Uru Whare Hauora

Schools:

 

Bathgate Park

Bayfield High

Carisbrook

Kings High

Musselburgh

Queens High

St Bernadettes

St Clair

Sara Cohen

Tahuna Normal Intermediate

Tainui

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

Community and Culture Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter ended 31 December 2016

Department: Community and Planning and Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the committee on key city, community, arts and cultural outcomes for the quarter ended 31 December 2016.

2      There have been small percentage increases in satisfaction with community and with cultural facilities across all measures. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Non-Financial Community, Arts and Cultural Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 31 December 2016.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Community and Planning group of activities works with other agencies to set the direction for managing Dunedin’s built and natural environment, and enables a strong sense of community and social inclusion through the provision of advice and support to community groups and social agencies and to provide events for the enjoyment of residents and visitors.

4      The Arts and Culture group of activities operates Dunedin Public Libraries, the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, the Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, the Dunedin Chinese Garden and the Olveston Historic Home.

DISCUSSION

5      The Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS) is the principal mechanism by which the Council measures resident satisfaction with a wide range of its activities.

6      From July 2016 the ROS has been conducted on a continuous monthly basis, aiming to obtain around 100 responses each month, to replicate the average annual sample size of around 1,200 obtained in previous years.  The quarterly results in the graphs below generally reflect the responses of around 300 residents. A sample of 300 has an expected 95% confidence interval (margin of error) of +/- 5.7%, whereas the annual result for 2015/16 had a margin of error of +/-2.5%. Results for the year will continue to be published in the annual ROS report at year end.

Satisfaction with community

7      A 2% increase in satisfaction with ‘sense of community’ was reported in 2014/15 compared to 2013/14. However this may not be significant given the survey margin of error.  It should be noted that neutral responses are included in satisfaction for the purposes of this particular measure, consistent with previous annual reports.

8      A 1% increase in satisfaction with ‘city festival and events’ was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the previous quarter, however this may not be significant given the survey margin of error. 

 

 

 

Satisfaction with cultural facilities

9      A 2% increase in satisfaction with Dunedin Public Libraries was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the previous quarter. 

10    A 4% increase in satisfaction with Dunedin Public Art Gallery was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the previous quarter. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11    A 1% increase in satisfaction with Toitu Otago Settlers Museum was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the previous quarter. 

12    A 1% increase in satisfaction with Dunedin Chinese Garden was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the previous quarter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13    Library visitation during 2016/17 has followed a similar trend to 2015/16 but at a slightly lower level of visitation. There is no one factor responsible for this trend but would include the increasing availability of alternative free wifi, variable weather and timing of Libraries public programmes.

14    Visitation to the Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2016/17 is above the level in 2015/16 and attributable to the calibre of exhibitions and public programmes, including the highly successful and interactive Obliteration Room exhibition by Yayoi Kusama which ran from 7 May to 7 August 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

15    Visitation to the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum for 2016/17 is above the level for the same period in 2015/16. Toitu remains the #1 Dunedin attraction from 104 attractions on Trip Advisor with continuing high levels of new visitation from visitors and repeat visitation from the local community. Key factors contributing to this level of visitation are the attractive displays and exhibitions as well as the public and education programme.

16    Visitation to the Dunedin Chinese Garden for 2016/17 is above the level for the same period in 2015/16 reflecting increased visitation by visitors and local residents due to the increasing public profile for the Garden and popular public programmes. The number of annual pass holders has also increased. The Dunedin Chinese Garden is currently sitting at #18 from a total of 104 Dunedin attractions in Trip Advisor.

17    Data for Olveston Historic Home will be included in future reports.

 

Major Initiatives

18    While the quantitative data related to the quarter quoted, the narrative updates on major initiatives and capital projects should cover activity which took place in the reporting period for the quantitative data and current activity at the time of reporting and next steps.

Policy

19    Quality of Life Survey 2016: Dunedin – The Quality of Life Survey 2016 results for the nine participating cities and regions was published in September 2016. This showed 88% of Dunedin’s residents rated their overall quality of life as extremely good or good, compared to 81% across the other cities. A Dunedin city-level report comparing results across five spatial areas of Dunedin was finalised in early 2017 and has been published at http://www.dunedin.govt.nz/your-council/quality-of-life-survey.

20    Art and Creativity in Infrastructure Policy – An Art and Creativity in Infrastructure Policy, with accompanying process and guidance, is being developed. The policy will put in place a clear framework for delivering on Ara Toi ambitions to embed a creative perspective in core work, in this case infrastructure projects. The policy is expected to go to the Council for approval on 8 May.

Community

21    Place Based Community Advisor – The fixed term Place Based Community Advisor was recruited during the quarter and is to work with the South Dunedin, Caversham, Green Island, and Pine Hill communities initially, with South Dunedin comprising 50% of his time.

22    South Dunedin Stakeholder Group – The South Dunedin Stakeholder Group held two meetings during this time to develop a shared purpose for its collaborative work to support community resilience.  Staff also engaged with a number of local organisations and held a meeting with schools in the area. Staff met with representatives from the Centre for Sustainability to discuss GIS mapping of the area, and the key information the South Dunedin Stakeholder Group and wider community would find of value.

23    Collaborating for Youth Success - More than 100 people attended the Collaborating for Youth Success hui at Otakau Marae in November.  Following this a meeting of people interested in supporting a community-led youth initiative was held, and the Community Development team requested to undertake interim coordination of this.  The Dunedin Youth Council recruited 10 new members for the 2017 year.

24    Dunedin Refugee Steering Group - Following discussions with the Dunedin Refugee Steering Group, it was decided the group would disband and would be replaced by an Advisory Group with a more strategic focus on refugee resettlement within the city.  Invitations were sent to potential Advisory Group members for a meeting early in 2017. A review of the ways in which other Councils around the country support refugee resettlement was also undertaken.

25    Enviroschools held a hui - for primary school students in South Dunedin; to support increased understanding of the area’s climate change issues.

26    Plans and Strategies – A plan for review of the Festivals and Events Strategy is underway and work continues with the Disability and Older Persons Action Plans; both of which will be further circulated as drafts before the end of the financial year.

27    Events - Event planning is underway for the New Year and Chinese New Year events. Funding was allocated to the Waitangi Day celebrations at Otakau Marae.

Cultural Facilities

28    Dunedin Public Art Gallery – Significant exhibitions launched during the period included Kushana Bush The Burning Hours and Tiffany Singh Om Mane Padme Hum.

29    Dunedin Chinese Garden – Planning for the Chinese New Year celebrations were a significant focus during the review period as was editing the Journey to Lan Yuan documentary film.

30    Toitu Otago Settlers Museum – Planning for the annual Burns Dinner and Robbie Rocks competition were a focus for the period along with editing of the Journey to Lan Yuan documentary film. Visitation to Pixie Town in December 2016 boosted overall Museum visitation to 33,904.

31    Dunedin Public Libraries – The Gig City Living Hub in the City Library was launched on 13 December 2016. The digital archive Scattered Seeds developed by the Dunedin Public Libraries with a grant from the Dunedin Lebanese community was awarded the Community Builder Award at the 2016 National Digital Forum.

Capital Projects

32    The South Dunedin Hub is the only major capital project being undertaken across the Community and Planning or Arts and Culture groups. It is covered in a concurrent report.

OPTIONS

33    As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

34    A further update report will be provided after the conclusion of the next quarter. South Dunedin Hub and work with stakeholders will be a key focus. The pop-up hub is proposed to be developed as a pilot project for the arts and creativity in infrastructure approach involving local creative people working with the project team from the early stages.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Community and Culture portfolio of activities support the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

As an update report, there are no specific implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

As an update report, there are no implications for the LTP, although some measures are level of service performance measures annually reported as part of the LTP.

Financial considerations

The updates reported are within existing operating and capital budgets.

Significance

This update report is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

As this is an update report no external engagement has been undertaken.

Engagement - internal

As this is an update report no internal engagement has been undertaken.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest identified in respect of this report.

Community Boards

Updates do not relate specifically to community boards although are likely to be of general interest to boards.

 

 


 

Public Art Framework

Department: Dunedin Public Art Gallery and Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report discusses potential governance options for the planning and commissioning of public art in Dunedin. The report also outlines a public engagement process timetabled for May – June 2017.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves in-house commissioning of public art as the preferred model for Council funded public art activity.

b)     Notes that Public Art Framework 2017-22 has been updated so that in-house commissioning is the preferred model for Council funded public art activity.

c)     Approves the Public Art Framework 2017-22 engagement process.

 

 

BACKGROUND

2      Council considered two reports on public art in December 2016, Rethinking Public Art and Public Art Framework 2017-22 (the Framework).  Rethinking Public Art, an independent report by Mr John McCormack and Dr Jin Jiangbo, identifies new ways for the Council and the community to approach public art drawing on national and international best practice.   The Framework sets out practical guidelines to lead and engage the public in the commissioning process and also care and maintain its public art collection.

3      In considering these reports Council resolved to:

“Request proposed potential governance options, including funding and membership mechanisms, by April 2017.”

DISCUSSION

4      The Ara Toi Otepoti Arts and Culture Strategy public engagement process endorsed the proposal that Dunedin take a ‘brave and ambitious’ approach towards public art and for DCC to take a leadership role. 

5      The Framework identifies a three-strand approach to delivering a new programme of public art for Dunedin. These are:

Strand 1: Leadership

6      Whereby the DCC leads a community focussed process to develop a 3-5 year strategic plan for a series of new public artworks for the city.

Strand 2: Development of ideas

 

7      Whereby a series of ‘Public Art Labs’ is established to work with a wide range of community and arts sector groups to seek and test ideas for public art. We will cast widely into the community for input but specifically target the arts community as well as local schools, Runaka, Otago Polytechnic and University based groups.  The DCC will also encourage temporary public arts projects and events to create new arts opportunities and encourage innovation.

 

Strand 3: Profile and engagement

 

8      Whereby the profile of the public art programme is raised and supported by a comprehensive communications strategy enabling the community to know what is going on and how to participate.    

Governance

 

9      In order to progress these initiatives and implement The Framework, Council needs to adopt a governance model for public art.

10    There are three public art commissioning models which Council could adopt. These are:

·           In-house commissioning.

 

·           To set up, or work with an existing independent trust entity.

 

·           To set up a commissioning panel comprised of Council and community representatives.

 

An in-house commissioning process

 

11    An in-house commissioning process would be undertaken by DCC officers working with the Public Art Lab model. The Public Art Lab would provide input of local advice and expertise. There is significant expertise within the DCC staff in such areas as working with artists, commissioning arts projects, engagement with the public, as well as delivering complex infrastructure projects. This internal model provides a close link between the commissioning process and ownership in the care and maintenance of the work. The Creative Dunedin Partnership (CDP) would be an important conduit in this process between the DCC, the creative sector and the community. 

12    This option offers flexibility in that it does not preclude working with an existing external trust on specific projects.

An Independent Trust

13    An independent trust set up by Council would receive funding from the Council to commission public art works which would be located on DCC-owned sites. Commissioning decisions would be made independently of the Council and an independent trust could be supported by a panel of experts to assist in the decision- making process. The intention, once completed, is that all public artworks commissioned by an independent trust would be gifted back to the DCC so they could be properly cared for and maintained by DCC. 

14    Being independent from Council would allow a trust to access fundraising opportunities not open to the DCC, and a trust would also be able to deliver a programme of public art.

15    A trust would incur overhead and administration costs. Attracting trustees with the requisite skills may prove difficult and there may be logistical or practical difficulties for an independent trust to work with DCC on site selection, material testing, public relations, as well as health and safety processes and assurances.  If trustees had full time jobs, it may also be difficult for them to find time to work within the Public Art Lab engagement model to test new ideas for public art. 

16    However the Framework allows for independent individuals or entities such as trusts to gift public artworks to the city. The Framework provides a robust process which provides for best practice and successful outcomes.

A commissioning panel

 

17    A commissioning panel model would be comprised of Councillors, DCC staff and representatives from the community to make commissioning decisions.  Budgets for commissions would remain within Council but the site and artist selection process would be run by this panel from Council, DCC staff, the art sector and the wider community.

OPTIONS

Option One – In-house commissioning - Recommended Option

Advantages

 

·           Utilises staff expertise and extensive community and art world network connections – especially in the Art Gallery and in Community Development and Events teams.

 

·           Flexibility – in house commissioning model does not preclude working with other independent trusts or entities.

 

·           More seamless transition and better alignment between commissioning and ownership, care and maintenance.

 

·           Ability to work with the ‘Public Lab’ community engagement model as DCC teams involved are already engaging with the public via DCC cultural facilities and other community-facing activities. The Public Lab allows input from local expertise and talent.

 

·           Given the existing close working relationship between the DCC and Creative Dunedin Partnership it may be easier for an in-house commissioning committee to work closely with that group.

 

·           An in-house programming committee, adopting the recommendations in the Rethinking Public Art and The Framework and working to advance the objectives of Ara Toi Otepoti, would commission artworks which contribute to vibrancy of the city.

 

Disadvantages / risks

 

·           Additional fundraising for projects may be more difficult.

 

Option Two – An independent trust

Advantages

·           An independent trust is able to actively fundraise to augment Council funding and it is able to attain charitable trust status and receive grants and other donations for its projects.

·           Artistic decision-making could be supported by an arts / community / iwi advisory panel.

·           A trust, adopting the recommendations in the Rethinking Public Art and The Framework and working to advance the objectives of Ara Toi Otepoti, would commission artworks which contribute to vibrancy of the city.

Disadvantages / risks

·           The success of an independent trust will be determined by the skills, experience, and commitment of the trustees.

·           Trustees may be hard to find. There is much competition in Dunedin for people with fundraising and other relevant professional skills to serve on trusts and other fundraising entities.

·           It may be difficult for Council to retain oversight of an independent trusts activity but this could be mitigated with Council representation on the body.

·           As the ultimate owner of public art commissions, the DCC needs to have input into the siting and technical performance of all new public art works. There is risk of disconnect between an independent trust and the DCC which could make this process complicated and lead to errors.

·           It may be harder to work with the ‘Public Art Lab’ community engagement model of investigating ideas, as this is a time consuming process.

·           Independent trusts incur significant administration, audit and other overhead costs; funds that could otherwise be spent on public art.

Option Three – Commissioning panel comprised of Council, Staff and Community representatives

Advantages

·           Provides an opportunity for Council to work closely with external experts and community representatives.

·           A commissioning panel, adopting the recommendations in the Rethinking Public Art and The Framework and working to advance the objectives of Ara Toi Otepoti, would commission artworks which contribute to vibrancy of the city.

Disadvantages / risks

·           Potential for projects to become stalled if commissions are ‘edgy’ and likely to   attract controversy.

 

·           Additional fundraising for projects may be more difficult.

 

Engagement plan

18    The purpose of a public engagement process is to inspire and engage the community on what might be possible for a new public art programme for Dunedin. It also offers the opportunity to check back with the community and creative sector now that The Framework has been developed.

19    The proposed engagement process will take place between May and July 2017 and will involve a number of ways to creatively elicit feedback from the community. These would include printed collateral, a digital and social media outreach strategy, sector focussed events and workshops, the Peoples Panel as well as consultation with Mana Whenua and communities via their Community Boards.

NEXT STEPS

20    The proposed plan is as follows:

May-         Printed material

June 2017  DL postcards with key message that relate back to The Framework will be distributed through DCC networks. These postcards will encourage the public to feedback their thoughts.

 

Maori

The runaka and Kāi Tahu ki Otago will be emailed information on the opportunity for input.

 

Community Boards

Community Board Chairs will be emailed information.

 

DCC website

Information regarding The Framework and the engagement process will be made available on the DCC’s website and included on the ‘Currently consulting on’ webpage.

 

June         Social Media

The DCC’s social media platforms will raise the profile of the work and engagement.  Creative sector and community stakeholders will also be encouraged to share this information widely.

 

               Sector workshop(s)

A workshop for the creative sector will be held at the Art Gallery which is likely to focus on the practical concerns of the Framework.

 

June         People’s Panel

Undertake a People’s Panel survey to raise awareness of public art in Dunedin and seek thoughts from the community on the direction of the Framework.

 

21    If the recommended governance option is adopted, then the DCC staff can begin the process of organising the required structure to deliver public art outcomes under this model.

22    The public engagement plan will be implemented as per the timetable.

 

Signatories

Author:

Vanessa George - Personal Assistant to the Director Dunedin Public Art Gallery

Cam McCracken - Dunedin Public Art Gallery Director

Authoriser:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Re-Thinking Public Art - McCormack Report

78

b

Public Art Framework 2017-2022

104

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The information provided in this report supports the DCC strategic framework in various ways. Public art adds to the Social Wellbeing Strategy by promoting vibrant and cohesive communities, it contributes to the Economic Development strategy by supporting alliances for innovation and the Arts and Culture Strategy by contributing to Dunedin’s identity and pride and providing accessible and inclusive experiences.

 

Māori Impact Statement

Both local runaka are represented on the Creative Dunedin Partnership, which has been engaged during the development of the Framework.  Manawhenua would be involved in consultation, where appropriate, with regard to any specific public art works.

 

Sustainability

The proposed establishment of the Arts Trust would contribute to financial sustainability by promoting revenue generation beyond any funds provided by Council.

 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Any contribution by Council towards public art and operation of a trust body would be considered as part of the Annual Plan and LTP process. Public Art Commissions would also be considered as part of the infrastructure strategy.

 

Financial considerations

A new independent trust to commission public art is likely to have annual operational costs and this will be reported back to the Council if it is decided a trust should be established.

 

Significance

The matters raised in this report are considered low significance in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. However there is significant community interest in public art.

 

Engagement – external

As part of the initial preparation to formulate The Framework, a well-attended public panel discussion to discuss the history and future opportunities for public art was held at the Art Gallery. This was a lively and wide-ranging discussion which largely endorsed the DCC to advocate for an ambitious programme of public art activity.

 

There has also been external engagement with John McCormack and Dr Jin Jiangbo in the development of this report.

 

The Creative Dunedin Partnership has been briefed on work to date and has noted progress made.

 

Engagement - internal

There has been internal engagement with Events and Community Development, Enterprise Dunedin, the Arts and Culture Group, Parks and Recreation, Transport and Water and Waste regarding this report. While there are differing views there is majority support for the recommended option.

 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified legal or health and safety risks related to this report.

 

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

 

Community Boards

There are no direct implications of the report for Community Boards. Community Boards would however be consulted and engaged with regard to public art proposals in their Board area.

 

 

 


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Community and Culture Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

 

That the Community and Culture Committee:

 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, exclude the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

 

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Confirmation of  the Confidential Minutes of Grants Subcommittee - 13 March 2017 - Public Excluded

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.