Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                             Monday 10 April 2017

Time:                            1.00 pm

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers,
The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kate Wilson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jim O'Malley

 

Members

David Benson-Pope

Dave Cull

 

Rachel Elder

Christine Garey

 

Doug Hall

Aaron Hawkins

 

Marie Laufiso

Mike Lord

 

Damian Newell

Chris Staynes

 

Conrad Stedman

Lee Vandervis

 

Andrew Whiley

 

 

Senior Officer                               Ruth Stokes, General Manager Infrastructure and Networks

 

Governance Support Officer      Wendy Collard

 

 

 

Wendy Collard

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Wendy.Collard@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

10 April 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Public Forum                                                                                             4

1.1   Mosgiel Pool Site and Next Steps                                                           4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5      

Part A Reports (Committee  has power to decide these matters)

5          Mosgiel Pool Site and Next Steps                                                                 15

6        Road names to add to the road name register                                               22

7        Proposal to name Private Way off Chadwick Street, Fairfield                            35

8        Proposed Road Stopping - Beaconsfield Road, Portobello                                  39

9        Items for Consideration by the Chair             

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

10 April 2017

 

 

 

1     Public Forum

1.1  Mosgiel Pool Site and Next Steps

Irene Mosley, Taieri Community Facilities Trust wishes to address the meeting concerning Mosgiel Pool Site and Next Steps Report.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

10 April 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee Members' Register of Interests

7

  



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Part A Reports

 

Mosgiel Pool Site and Next Steps

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report seeks confirmation of the existing Mosgiel pool site and immediately surrounding area as the preferred site for the development of a new aquatic facility in Mosgiel.

2      The site recommendation is based on feedback from a number of public consultation processes completed since 2012, analysis of infrastructure provision and the proposed development’s effect on existing recreational spaces.

3      Confirmation of the site will enable refinement of design concepts and assist the Taieri Community Facilities Trust (the Trust) in progressing fundraising efforts.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves the existing Mosgiel pool site and immediately surrounding area as the preferred site for the development of a new aquatic facility in Mosgiel.

b)     Acknowledges the continued commitment of the Taieri Community Facilities Trust to the project.

 

 

BACKGROUND

4      After considering Long Term Plan (LTP) submissions in May 2015, the Council resolved:

a)     That the Council agrees to:

(i)    Support in principle the development of a new aquatic facility for Dunedin in Mosgiel.

(ii)   Fund up to $300,000 from the 2015 underspend to progress:

a.     geotechnical investigations and designation of a site

b.     development of design and capital and operating budgets

c.     liaison and communication of progress.

(iii)   Approve an interest free loan of $50,000 to the Trust for operational costs to be repaid from early fundraising once the Council confirms a decision to proceed.

(iv)   Acknowledge the substantial progress the Trust has made in developing the proposal and thank them for their contribution completing the first part of the proposal.

(v)   Request that staff and the Trust work on the development of a new MoU to be presented to the Community and Environment Committee at a later date for ratification.

b)     That Council includes in the LTP a placeholder of $6 million in 2018-19 for new aquatic facilities in Mosgiel, noting that staff would:

(i)    Work closely with the Trust.

(ii)   Report back concept design options and costs by 30 October 2015.

(iii)   Report back developed design options and costs by 30 April 2016.

(c)    That Council confirms that the capital expenditure on new aquatic facilities in Mosgiel is subject to the Trust achieving a fundraising target of $7.5 million and final Council approval of the project.

5      A report back to Council in November 2015 recommended the existing Mosgiel pool site. Appended was a report from the Chair of the Steering Group with a resolution the Steering Group supported the existing Mosgiel pool site and immediate surrounds as the preferred location for a new development (Attachment A).

6      Since the 2015 meeting Council and The Trust have continued to work on identifying a preferred site for a new aquatic facility. Identifying this site will enable to Trust to commence fundraising activities and design work.

DISCUSSION

Site Consultation

7      The Trust and Council have carried out a number of consultation exercises to gauge the community’s opinion on a preferred site.

8      In deciding on the location for a new facility a number of elements were considered including the opportunity for growth, the ability to reduce operating cost (through smart design, co-location of activities, third party support) and accessibility to current and future populations.

9      In recommending the existing Mosgiel pool site and immediately surrounding area as the preferred site for the development of a new aquatic facility in Mosgiel the following matters were considered:

·      The Trust’s original Feasibility Study, which identified five possible sites and a preliminary assessment of their strengths and weaknesses

·      Feedback received from the community during formal Council consultation on a range of site options

·      Preliminary geotechnical results from three sites.

·      Site ownership

·      Status of land

·      Capacity of, and implications for, the transport network

·      Proximity of the sites to the Central Business District and schools

·      Ease of access to the site, from public transport and on active modes, as well as private motor vehicles

·      The ability of the site to cater for parking requirements and onsite traffic movements

·      Capacity of, and implications for, the water, wastewater and stormwater networks

·      Recorded flooding issues

·      Geotechnical matters

·      Possible impacts on existing Council-owned facilities and their users, including but not limited to Memorial Gardens and the associated playground, sports fields and the Caravan Park

·      The benefits and costs of co-locating the aquatic facility with other existing Council facilities

·      Future expansion options

·      Possible impacts on neighbours

·      Possible procedural complications

 

Existing Pool Site

10    The existing pool site is considered to be the most appropriate site to progress the pool project. Information and feedback has been sought from Sportsfield users, Otago Regional Council, internal departments including Planning, Parks and Recreation, Water and Waste Services and Transport.

11    The existing pool site and surrounding area includes space on Memorial Park which is currently used by a variety of sporting codes. The potential loss of football field/s and space from existing cricket fields would be likely, depending on the final size and scope of a facility. Staff are working on sports field demand analysis that will assist in determining future requirements and levels of services for sporting codes.

12    The recommended site is partially occupied by a camping ground which has a lease agreement with the Council. Once the scope and size of a future aquatic facility is determined, the requirement to relocate the camping ground can be assessed. The current lease expires in 2023, however staff have had a number of discussions with the current Lessee who is open to working with Council.

13    Following consideration of all relevant information The Trust agrees that the existing Mosgiel Pool site and immediately surrounding area is the most appropriate space for a new aquatic facility.

Other sites

14    A number of sites have been considered and evaluated since a new pool for Mosgiel was first proposed. The Trust has run two community consultations independently in 2014 and more recently from December 2016 - February 2017. A joint consultation between the Trust and Council June 2015 supported the existing pool site and recommended it to Council in November 2015. Sites previously considered are not considered reasonably practicable primarily due to land status and loss of recreation amenity space.

Annual Plan 2017/18

15    As per the November 2015 resolution, Council was to determine whether to change the quantum and/or timing of its financial contribution. Council has an allocation of $6m in the 2018/19 financial year subject to the Trust has raising $7.5m.

16    As the project has not developed beyond site selection, staff recommend deferring the requirement to review quantum or timing until the Long term Plan.

NEXT STEPS

17    The Trust has indicated support of the staff recommendation to provide certainty on the preferred site will aid with fundraising efforts and will allow the facility planning process to continue.

18    Staff will report back prior to the Long Term Plan with options for facility design and to update the Council on fundraising efforts by the Trust.

 

Signatories

Author:

Jendi Paterson - Recreation Planning and Facilities Manager

Authoriser:

Richard Saunders - Acting Group Manager Transport

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Mosgiel Pool Preferred Site

21

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The provision of a new aquatic facility in Mosgiel is relevant to a number of Council's strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There is no impact on Tangata Whenua at this stage of the project

Sustainability

The development of new community infrastructure in Mosgiel supports social sustainability and sustainability principles will be considered in the developed design and operation of the facility.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Funding of $6 million is set aside for the development of a new aquatic facility in Mosgiel in the 2018/2019 year subject to the satisfaction of a number of conditions.  Any further commitment over this in excess of $2m will breach the debt limit imposed through the Financial Strategy.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications with the decision of this report.

Significance

This decision does not trigger Council's Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

Engagement with the community through consultations has occurred. Staff have maintained regular engagement with key stakeholders including the camping ground owner, Football South, Otago Cricket and other sports users. The Otago regional Council has provided high level information regarding sites. Partnership with the Taieri Community facility Trust is on-going.

Engagement - internal

Transport, Water and Waste Services and Urban Design have been involved in providing advice on future site locations and the impact on current and future infrastructure.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no risks associated with this decision

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest

Community Boards

The Mosgiel Community Board has decided to remain neutral on their position of a future pool site but supports the pool project progressing.

 

 


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Road names to add to the road name register

Department: Information Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      In November 2011, the Infrastructure Services Committee (the Committee) created a list of approved names for future road naming opportunities.  The development of the Road Name Register is an iterative process and members of the public, Councillors and staff are encouraged to propose names for inclusion on the register.  This report presents the latest list of suggested road names as put forward by members of the public and staff.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves the presented names for inclusion on the Road Name Register.

 

BACKGROUND

2      In November 2011 the Infrastructure Services Committee, as part of the discussions around the new Road Naming Policy, approved the creation of a Road Name Register. 

3      The Infrastructure Services Committee, at the meeting of 12 July 2016, requested a list of names of people who have been notable in the history of Dunedin.  Staff used the Otago Daily Times and the August publication of FYI to invite public suggestions for new road names. 

DISCUSSION

4      Dunedin heritage experts also provided feedback along with those suggestions put forward by members of the public.  Names of local plants provided by the staff at the Botanic Gardens have also been included for consideration. 

5      Staff have checked the suggested names against the Road Naming Policy and all the names presented comply with the policy. 

6      It is recommended that surnames are used as the use of a given name would not align with the policy.  

7      The names are discussed below, with the suggested name in bold followed by a brief biography to provide background and context.

Barnett

8      Arthur Barnett OBE (1873-1959).  Businessman and founder of the Arthur Barnett chain of department stores.  Born in Dunedin, he opened his first shop in 1903 and within 10 years had one of the largest shops in the South Island.  He was also a noted philanthropist and was awarded the OBE in 1951.

Barningham

9      Ellen Barningham (1860? – 1942).  Awarded the Belgian Queen Elisabeth Medal during World War I.  The Queen Elisabeth Medal was created in 1915 to recognise exceptional services in aiding Belgian refugees. 

Batham

10    Elizabeth Joan Batham (1917-1974).  Marine Biologist and University Lecturer.  Born in Dunedin, Elizabeth studied science at Otago University from 1936, graduating with first class honours in Botany (1940) and Zoology (1941).  Her interest in Marine Biology developed during the war years and in 1945 she went to England, gaining a Cambridge Doctorate in 1948.  She returned to Dunedin in 1950 and revived the Portobello marine station and worked there until shortly before her death in 1974.

Benson

11    William Noel Benson (1885-1957).  Geologist.  Born in England, Benson studied geology at the Universities of Tasmania, Sydney (1905-07) and Oxford (1911-14).  In 1917 he became Chair of Geology and Mineralogy at Otago University and stayed until 1951.  For the first nine years he was the only lecturer in the Geology Department.  During his lifetime he published over 100 papers and was awarded the Lyell Medal in 1939 and the Clark Medal in 1945, as well as many other awards.  Between 1945 & 1947 he was president of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Brasch

12    Charles Brasch (1909-1973).  Poet and founder of the ‘Landfall’ journal.  Born in Dunedin, he went to Oxford in the 1920s before returning to Dunedin in 1931.  He travelled widely in the 1930s and served in the Britain during WW2.  He returned to Dunedin in 1946 and founded ’Landfall’ in 1947, remaining its editor for 20 years. 

Burton

13    Alfred Henry Burton (1833/35-1914).  One of New Zealand’s most important 19th century photographers.  Born in Leicester, he immigrated to New Zealand in 1868, setting up a studio in Dunedin.  He photographed much of the lower South Island’s landscape and in 1884 travelled to the Pacific Islands.  From 1885 until his retirement in 1896 he travelled and photographed throughout New Zealand.

Cavanagh

14    Victor George Cavanagh (1874-1952) Senior and (1909-1980) Junior.  Both were heavily involved in the development of Rugby Union in New Zealand.  "Young Vic" was also a talented Cricketer and worked for both the ODT and the Evening Star, overseeing the merger of the two newspapers, and was head of Allied Press for its first years, retiring in 1976.

Coory

15    Shirefie Coory (1864/65-1950).  Businesswoman and matriarch.  Born in Lebanon, she married in 1880/81 and three years later the family moved to Australia, setting up business in Melbourne.  In 1892 they moved to Dunedin and opened a fancy goods store and later moved into importing.  She dominated the business and became a substantial landowner in the city.

Cuddie

16    Mary Cuddie (1823-1889).  Farmwife, midwife and businesswoman.  Born in Scotland, she married in 1844 and had 11 children.  Her first child was baptised by Rev Thomas Burns, who persuaded the couple to emigrate to Otago in 1847.  In 1854 the couple purchased a farm on Saddle Hill.  In 1879 she bought a grocery shop and proved to be an excellent businesswoman.

Dallas

17    Ruth Dallas (1919-2008).  Poet.  Born Ruth Mumford in Invercargill, she adopted Dallas as her pen name.  Her first book of poetry was published in 1953 and she moved to Dunedin in 1954.  She was awarded the 1968 Robert Burns Fellowship at the University of Otago and was made an honorary Doctor of Literature in 1978.  In 1989 she was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire.

de Beer

18    Esmond de Beer (1895-1990).  Scholar, editor, collector, bibliophile and philanthropist.  Born in Dunedin, the family moved to London in 1910 and he studied at Oxford before serving in WW1.  Although he spent much of the rest of his life in England, he regarded Dunedin as his home and was a major benefactor of Dunedin's museums, libraries and galleries.

Fache

19    Ada Fache (1918-1994).  City Librarian 1960-68.  She began working in the Dunedin Public Library in 1937 and, apart from two years in Rangiora, spent her whole career in Dunedin.  She was only the second woman in New Zealand to be appointed to head of a major metropolitan library.  The Ada Fache Fund was established by a bequest from her to the Library Association to fund the future development of individual librarians. 

Ferens

20    Ferens, Margaret (nee Westland) (1838 -1926).  Arrived on the John Wickcliffe in 1848 aged 10 with her aunt and uncle.   She later married Thomas Ferens in 1854, theirs being the first European marriage in North Otago.  The Ferens produced 14 children and established three churches.  The couple were also responsible for the introduction of Clydesdale horses into the Otago region.

Gaskell

21    Alexander Pickard Gaskell (1913-2006).  Writer, sportsman, teacher, water-colourist, graduated from University of Otago and its rugby team in 1936.

Geerin

22    Miss Kathleen Geerin (1878-1967).  Awarded the Belgian Queen Elisabeth Medal during World War I.  The Queen Elisabeth Medal was created in 1915 to recognise exceptional services in aiding Belgian refugees. 

Glover

23    Denis James Matthews Glover (1912-1980).  Poet, journalist, typographer, publisher and naval officer.  Denis was born in Dunedin and began his education here.  In 1931 he attended the University of Canterbury, gaining a BA in English and Greek, and worked as a lecturer and journalist until the outbreak of war in 1939.  He served with the Royal Navy 1941-44, earning the DSC, and then with the RNZNVR, rising to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander in 1951.

Griffiths

24    Vernon Griffiths (1894-1985).  Born in England, after serving in WW1, Vernon won a Scholarship to Cambridge, graduating in 1922.  Teaching music became his passion and he moved to New Zealand in 1926 to lecture in music at Canterbury Teachers College.  He moved to Dunedin in 1933 to be Music Master at King Edward Technical College, creating his own teaching scheme, which received international attention in later years.  He returned to Christchurch in 1942 as Professor of Music at Canterbury University.

Gunn

25    Elizabeth Gunn (1879-1963).  Born in Dunedin and educated at Otago Girls High School and Otago University before moving to Scotland and graduating from the Edinburgh Medical School in 1903.  She was a GP in Wellington before serving in the NZ Medical Corps 1915-17.  Her time in England in 1917 highlighted the problems of child welfare.  On returning to NZ, she promoted the introduction of daily milk for school children,  inaugurated the Children's Health Camp Movement in 1919 and spent the rest of her career promoting children's health.

Hatton

26    Marion Hatton (1835-1905).  New Zealand suffragist.  Born in England, as a young woman Marion was involved in the temperance movement.  After her marriage to Joseph Hutton they immigrated to Dunedin and in 1892 chaired a meeting in Dunedin in support of Women’s Suffrage.  She became the principal speaker in the lower south and organised petitions to Parliament.  The Bill was passed on 8 September 1893 – Marion's birthday.  She continued to work on equality for women and was involved in the formation of the National Council of Women.

Herd

27    Joyce Herd (1921-2007).  Dunedin City Councillor, 1977-1980, 1980-1983 and president of the YWCA.  Born in England, Joyce and her family moved to Dunedin in 1953.  She gained a BA (over 10 years) and joined the National Council of Women amongst many other organisations.  In 1985 she was awarded a QSO.

Hinds

28    Elizabeth Hinds (1940-1998).  Director of the Otago Early Settlers Museum 1983-1996.  She gained her BA in 1961 and MA (Hons) in 1967.  She worked as an archaeologist in the Pacific Islands, became acting director of the Fiji Museum in the late sixties then moved to the Gisborne Art Gallery and Museum, and ultimately became the director of the OESM.  She revitalised the Otago Early Settler's Association and with it the Museum. 

Knight

29    Hardwicke Knight (1911-2008).  Photographer, historian and collector.  Born in London, Hardwicke moved to Dunedin in 1957 as director of the Medical Photographic Unit of the Otago Medical School.  He was not only a fine photographer in his own right, but published extensively on the history of New Zealand photography and photographers and on the history of Otago.  He was awarded a QSO in 1991.

Langlands

30    William Langlands (1817-1889).  Born in Edinburgh and trained as a clerk and designer, he immigrated to Dunedin in 1850.  He served on the Dunedin Town Board in the 1850s and designed a number of buildings including the old Mechanics Institute and the old Knox Church.

Lewin

31    George Lewin (1867-1941).  Town clerk for 26 years (1911-1937).  Born in Lyttleton, he was Town Clerk of that borough from 1900-1911 before moving to Dunedin.  In 1935 he was made a Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George.  He was considered one of the outstanding municipal executive heads of his day.

Lister

32    Samuel Lister (1832/3-1913).  Printer, newspaper proprietor and editor.  Born in Scotland, he immigrated to Auckland in 1865 and by 1868 he had moved to Dunedin.  Over the next 20 years he was involved in the engraving and printing trades.  In 1887 he started the "Otago Workman", a weekly newspaper that soon took a major role in shaping the working class identity and the strategy of the new unions.

Lo Keong

33    Matilda Lo Keong (1854/56-1915).  Store keeper, homemaker and community worker.  The first known Chinese woman in New Zealand.  Her origins are obscure, but she is known to have been resident in Australia, where she married.  She joined her husband in Dunedin in late 1873.  She raised her six children to be well educated members of the wider community, helped with the Chinese Mission Church and was known for her charitable works.

Lusk

34    Doris Lusk (1916-1990).  Artist and art teacher, potter and lecturer.  Born in Dunedin and educated at Otago Girls High School and King Edward Technical.  She attended art school in Dunedin 1934-39, learning painting and pottery.  She first exhibited in the 1940s and was one of New Zealand's pioneer potters.  Her work rose to prominence in the 1950s and 1960s and she lectured in art at Canterbury University from the 1960s.

Mandeno

35    Henry Mandeno (1879-1973).  Modernist Architect.  Born in Te Awamutu, he was educated in Auckland before moving to Dunedin.  While working as a builder he did night classes in architectural draughtsmanship.  After working for Mason and Wales, he set up his own practice in 1911.  His first major commission was King Edward Technical College.  In 1914 his design was chosen for the new Town Hall; however, WW1 intervened and when the new Town Hall was eventually built in the late 1920s the design had significant changes.  Other buildings include Santa Sabina Convent, the Central Fire Station and Speights Brewery.  His last major work was the main block at Wakari Hospital in 1957.

McCahon

36    Colin McCahon (1919-1987).  Regarded as New Zealand’s foremost artist.  Born in Timaru, he was enrolled in the Dunedin School of Art 1937-39.  He first exhibited in Dunedin in 1939.  In 1953 he moved to Auckland and worked at the Auckland City Art Gallery and from 1964 taught at the Elam School of Fine Arts.

McCarthy

37    Mary Ann Recknall McCarthy (1866-1933).  Born and educated in Dunedin.  Having trained as a teacher in Dunedin, she taught in at different schools in the south from 1888-1913.  She joined the NZ Women’s Christian Temperance Union and from 1906 became increasingly involved in promoting gender equality and,  after 1919,  world peace and internationalism.  She was involved with the Labour Party from its inception in 1916.

Mackie

38    John Bullamore Mackie (1910-2011).  He was born in Dunedin, and trained at the School of Mines in the 1930's.  After graduation he worked in Malaya and spent three years as a Prisoner of War of the Japanese.  Returning to Dunedin in 1947 he lectured in surveying at the School of Mines.  When the school was closed in 1963, Prof Mackie became the foundation head of the National School of Surveying, retiring in 1976.  He was president of the NZ Institute of Surveyors 1977-79.  He was nationally and internationally renowned for his pioneering work in surveying.

McEwan

39    William Baxter McEwan (1870-1933).  Dunedin's first public librarian.  Born in Edinburgh, he worked in the book trade from the age of 14.  He became a public librarian in Stirling in 1903, before immigrating to New Zealand in 1906.  He became Dunedin's public librarian in 1908.  Starting with an empty building, he opened the fully stocked reading room after six months, with a reference library and children's library following by 1910.  Under his stewardship the library gained the McNab and Reed collections.  He was librarian for almost 25 years and his influence spread nationwide.

McFarlane

40    Shona McFarlane CBE (1929-2001).  Artist, journalist and broadcaster.  Born in Gore and educated at Otago Girls High School and then Dunedin Teachers College.  She taught art before moving to London in the mid-1950s.  Returning to Dunedin, she was a journalist from the 1960, served on the QE II Arts Council, the Otago Art Society and the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, amongst many other groups.  She is probably best known for being a panelist on "Beauty and the Beast" from 1976-85.

Meluish

41    William Meluish (1822/23-1888).  Photographer and businessman.  Apparently born in London, little is known of William until his arrival in Nelson in 1858, where he set up as a photographer.  He moved to Dunedin in 1860 and opened a studio and imported photographic equipment.  His outstanding contribution was the documentation of 1860s Dunedin in photographs.  By 1870, when he returned to London, his land holdings in Dunedin had made him a wealthy man.

Nordmeyer

42    Sir Arnold Nordmeyer (1901-1989).  Born in Dunedin, he studied Theology at Knox College and was ordained a minister in 1925.  Working in North Otago from 1925-35, the harsh conditions endured by workers on the Waitaki Valley dams inspired him to get involved in politics.  He was elected Labour MP for Oamaru in 1935 and finally retired from politics in 1969.  He helped introduce many of New Zealand’s social policies, but is probably best known for his "Black Budget" of 1958.

Petre

43    Francis William Petre (1847-1918).  Born in Petone to one of England's oldest Catholic families.  He was educated in England and France and trained as an architect 1864-69.  In 1872 he returned to New Zealand as a railway engineer, before starting his own architectural and engineering practice in 1875.  In 1877 his first major commission was St Dominic's Priory, built in monolithic concrete.  He thus became the leading Catholic Church architect in New Zealand, most importantly the Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Christchurch 1901-05.  He also built many houses and was a pioneer in the use of concrete in New Zealand.

Proudfoot

44    David Proudfoot (1838/39-1894).  Engineer and Contractor.  Little is known of his early life, but the family immigrated to Australia in 1852 and then David moved to Dunedin in the early 1860s.  In 1865 he took the contract for building the Dunedin Water Works and then built the Port Chalmers railway.  He then built large sections of the South Island Main Trunk line.  In 1879 he began running trams, giving Dunedin the country’s most advanced transport network.  His feats of engineering were extensive and in all manner of fields.

Pyke

45    Vincent Pyke (1827-1894).  Administrator, politician, journalist, writer.  Born in England, he immigrated to Australia in 1851.  He went gold mining in Victoria and was elected to the Legislative Council.  In 1862 he moved to Otago, where the Provincial Government appointed him administrator of the Otago goldfields.  His Mining Regulations formed the basis for the development of gold mining in New Zealand.  From 1873 he was heavily involved in both local and national politics in the Otago area.  He also published a number of books on Otago and gold mining.

Slatter

46    Robert Slatter(1850-1931).  Born in England, he came to Dunedin in 1879 and immediately began to organise trade unions.  He was prominently involved in the maritime strike of 1890 and helped to organise Labour Day, now a national holiday.  In 1895 he elected the worker assessor in the new Arbitration Court, which he helped develop into a body to legislate wages and work conditions.

Te Rangi Hiroa

47    Sir Peter Buck (1877-1951).  Born in Taranaki and educated at Te Aute College.  He trained as a doctor at Otago Medical School, becoming an MD in 1910.  He was elected to parliament in 1909.  He served as medical officer with the Maori contingent in WW1, serving at Gallipoli and on the Western front.  On his return to New Zealand he was appointed Chief Maori Medical Officer.

Theomin

48    Dorothy Theomin (1888-1966).  Born in Dunedin, Dorothy travelled widely with her parents in her early years, returning to Dunedin to the newly completed Olveston.  She became deeply involved in her family’s philanthropic activities and had a lifelong interest in the arts.  She never married and on her death left Olveston and its contents to the people of Dunedin. 

Tuhawaiki

49    Hone Tuhawaiki (?-1844).  Also known as John or Bloody Jack.  He was a leader of the southern Ngai Tahu.  He was a whaler, mariner and trader and also had a reputation as a bold and clever military leader.

Tuwhare

50    Hone Tuwhare (1922-2008).  Poet.  Born in Northland he immersed himself in both Maoritanga and English literature.  A boilermaker by trade, he served in J-Force in Japan after the war.  He was active in the New Zealand Communist Party from 1942 until 1956.  From this time he began to write and published his first collection in 1964.  In 1969 he was awarded the Robert Burns Fellowship to the University of Otago.         

Botanical Names

51    The staff at the Botanic Gardens have provided a list of plant names.  The table below provides a list of plants under both their common names and the names they are locally known as.  Both names for each have been checked against the Road Naming Policy and are suitable for addition to the register.  These are as follows:

Common name

Locally known as

Bush flax

Kakaha

Cabbage tree

Tī kouka

Flax

Harakeke

Lacebark

Houi

Lemonwood

Tarata

Mahoe

Hinahina

Marbleleaf

Piripiriwhata

Matipo

Māpau

Miro

Miro, toromiro

Pepper tree

Ramarama

Rautawhiri

Rautawhiri

Rush

Wīwī

Saltmarsh

Mākaka, runa

Silver tussock

Pātītī

Supplejack

Pirita

Tapatapauma

Kāpuka

Toetoe

Toetoe

Tree daisy

Pekapeka

Tree fuchsia

Kōtukutuku

Wineberry

Mako

 

52    A number of other names were submitted for consideration but are not recommended, as the proposed name or individual has previously been recognised by the community through the naming of a building, park, landmark or other acknowledgement.  These names are included in Attachment B for information.

OPTIONS

53    This report is administrative.  The options are that these names either be approved and added to the Road Name Register, or not added. 

NEXT STEPS

54    Once names have been considered and approved the Road Name Register will be updated on the Dunedin City Council website to reflect the additions.

 

Signatories

Author:

Bruce Hall - Information Support

Authoriser:

John Stewart - Acting Digital Services Manager

Tracey  Tamakehu  - Acting Chief Information Officer

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Names submitted but not suitable

31

b

List of names to add to the Road Name Register

33

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This proposal relates to local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

This report presents names for the Road Name Register and is administrative only.

Māori Impact Statement

The Maori Participation Working Party was consulted and have provided feedback.  Work is underway on an inventory of existing Maori street names before the Maori Participation Working Party considers the matter further.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

There are no known financial implications.

Significance

The significance of the decision is low when assessed against the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

Several names where suggested via email by members of the public for consideration.

Engagement - internal

Names were suggested from several internal sources and were researched by the archives team.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards have not been consulted.

 

 


Names submitted but not suitable

 

Adie

Syd Adie (1937-2014)].  The Brockville Battler.  For many years Chairman of the Dunedin Ratepayers and Householders Association and a vocal critic of the Council.  Already has a park named after him – Syd Adie Corner.

Awatea

The road name was previously used in the city, having been removed during the Forsyth Barr Stadium development.  The name should not be re-used as this will cause duplication of property and archive records.

Fletcher

Sir James Fletcher (1886-1974).  Founder of Fletcher Construction.  Born in Scotland, he arrived in Dunedin in 1908 and set up Fletcher Brothers, which grew into Fletcher Holdings by 1940.  He was seconded by the Government in 1942 for roles such as the Commissioner of Defence Construction and knighted in 1946.  Fletcher House, Broad Bay was built by Sir James in 1909 and restored in 1990 by Fletcher Challenge.  Fletcher Construction is a current trading name.

Hercus

Charles Ernest Hercus (1888-1971).  Born in Dunedin, Charles graduated as a dentist in 1911.  He then took a medical degree, graduating in 1914.  During WW1 he served at Gallipoli and in Palestine.  In 1920 he was appointed one of eight new District Health Officers, and in 1921 he was appointed Professor of Public Health at Otago University.  In 1937 he was elected Dean of the Medical School.  He was knighted in 1947 and retired in 1958.  The Hercus Building is part of the University’s Medical School.

Howlison

Edward Howlison (1866-1938).  Bicycle manufacturer, motor vehicle business company manager and Dunedin City Councillor (1898-99).  Edward Howlison and Frederick Cooke founded Cooke Howlison in 1895, initially manufacturing bicycles.  They sold their first car in 1907.  Cooke Howlison is a current trading name.

Leander

This War ship played a significant part in WWII with compliment of Otago Navy Personnel with 2 later settling in Brighton.  This request by a member of the public was not accepted.  The road name was previously used in the city, having been removed during the Forsyth Barr Stadium development.  The name cannot be re-used as this will cause duplication of property and archive records.

Naylor

W H ‘Hugh’ Naylor (1884-1957).  Born in Clyde, he built his first house in Dunedin in 1910, he built the BNZ building in Mosgiel in 1917 and this led to him building more banks in small town Otago.  From there the jobs got progressively larger.  The company he formed eventually merged with Love Brothers to from Naylor Love in 1969 and the company is still in existence.

Skinner

Henry Skinner (1886-1978).  Soldier, ethnologist, university lecturer, museum curator and director and librarian.  Born in New Plymouth, he inherited an early interest in history from his father.  He studied Law at Victoria College 1906-09 and in 1911 moved to Dunedin to study at Otago University.  In WW1 he was wounded at Gallipoli and later discharged as unfit for further duty.  After further study in England he returned to New Zealand in 1918 where he worked at the Otago Museum and lectured at the University.  He spent his career studying Maori artefacts and origins.  He had a profound influence on the development of Anthropology and Ethnology in New Zealand.  There is an HD Skinner Annex at the Otago Museum.

Speight

Charles Speight (1865-1928).  Brewer and businessman.  Born and educated in Dunedin, in 1881 he began a brewing apprenticeship in his father’s brewery.  By 1887 he was head brewer and by 1897 was effectively head of, what was by then, the largest brewery in the country.  He was known for his concern for staff welfare and quality of production.  In 1923 he was deeply involved in the creation of New Zealand Breweries, of which he remained a director until his death.  Speights Brewery is a current trading name

Taiaroa

Hori Kerei Taiaroa (?-1905).  Paramount chief of the southern Ngai Tahu and Maori Member of Parliament.  Born at Otakou, he represented the Southern Maori electorate 1871-79 and 1881-85, when he was appointed to the Legislative Council on which he served until his death.  Taiaroa Head is named after him.


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

10 April 2017

 

 

List of names to add to the Road Name Register

 

Notable Dunedin Individuals

Barnett

Barningham

Batham

Benson

Brasch

Burton

Cavanagh

Coory

Cuddie

Dallas

de Beer

Fache

Ferens

Geerin

Gaskell

Griffiths

Glover

Hatton

Gunn

Hinds

Herd

Langlands

Knight

Lister

Lewin

Lusk

Lo Keong

McCahon

Mandeno

Mackie

McCarthy

McFarlane

McEwan

Nordmeyer

Meluish

Proudfoot

Petre

Slatter

Pyke

Theomin

Te Rangi Hiroa

Tuwhare

Tuhawaiki

 

 

 

Local Plants

Common name

Southern name/s

Bush flax

Kakaha

Cabbage tree

Tī kouka

Flax

Harakeke

Lacebark

Houi

Lemonwood

Tarata

Mahoe

Hinahina

Marbleleaf

 Piripiriwhata

Matipo

Māpau

Miro

Miro, toromiro

Pepper tree

Ramarama

Rautawhiri

Rautawhiri

Rush

Wīwī

Saltmarsh

Mākaka, runa

Silver tussock

Pātītī

Supplejack

Pirita

Tapatapauma

Kāpuka

Toetoe

Toetoe

Tree daisy

Pekapeka

Tree fuchsia

Kōtukutuku

Wineberry

Mako

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

10 April 2017

 

 

 

Proposal to name Private Way off Chadwick Street, Fairfield

Department: Information Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to present the options for the naming of a private way off Chadwick Street as part of an industrial development by JPD Trustee Limited and Trevor Cockburn. The developer's preference complies with the Dunedin City Council Road Naming Policy.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves the naming of a new private way off Chadwick Street as "Cleveland Close".

 

BACKGROUND

2      A 20 lot light industrial estate has been approved at 7 Chadwick Street, Fairfield. The development will have an internal road servicing the 20 Lots. As per Section 1.3 of the Road Naming Policy a private way of more than five lots should be named.

 DISCUSSION

3      The Developer has proposed "Cleveland Close" as their preferred name for this private way. An alternative name was not submitted.

4      "Cleveland Close" is named for Les Cleveland (1931-2013). Les Cleveland was a philanthropist, businessman, regional councillor, singer, conservationist and gardener. He was awarded the OBE in 1995 and was named Dunedin Citizen of the Year in 1997.  Over many years he donated more than two million daffodil bulbs and 8,000 rhododendrons for the beautification of the city. 7 Chadwick Street was owned by Mr Cleveland and was previously the site of the Oderings Nursery.

5      The name fits the appropriateness criteria of the Road Name Guidelines, specifically section F which allows a personal name in recognition of a special service.

6      The name is not the same or similar to any other road name in Dunedin.

7      The family of Les Cleveland has given their permission to this proposal.

8      The Saddle Hill Community Board supports this proposal.

9      No alternative name has been suggested. The developer is aware of the potential issues this may cause.

OPTIONS

10    As the name complies with the policy no options other than the recommendation have been presented.

NEXT STEPS

11    If the recommended name is approved, staff will process the required documentation and advise the developer and Land Information New Zealand of the new road name.

 

Signatories

Author:

Bruce Hall - Information Support

Authoriser:

John Stewart - Acting Digital Services Manager

Tracey  Tamakehu  - Acting Chief Information Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

38

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This proposal relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

This is an administrative function.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.

Significance

The significance of the decision is low.

Engagement – external

There has been external engagement with the developer.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The Saddle Hill Community Board was consulted and supports this proposal.

 

 


 

 



Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

10 April 2017

 

 

 

Proposed Road Stopping - Beaconsfield Road, Portobello

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The owner of 1 McAuley Road, Portobello, has applied to have a portion of unformed legal road adjoining the property stopped and amalgamated with their property. 

2      This report seeks a resolution to issue public notice of the Council’s intention to stop the road, under section 342 and Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves the publishing of a public notice advertising the intention to stop a portion of legal road adjacent to 1 McAuley Road, Dunedin, subject to the applicant agreeing to:

i)      Pay the Council the non-refundable fee for processing the stopping

ii)     Pay the Council the actual costs involved in the stopping, regardless of whether or not the stopping reaches a conclusion, OR the value of the stopped road, assessed by the Council’s valuer, whichever is the greater amount

iii)    Amalgamate the stopped portion of the road with the title of the adjacent land that is owned by the applicant, namely  OT79/116

iv)    Accept the application of the standards contained within the Dunedin City Council Code for Subdivision and Development to the stopped road

v)     Register an easement upon the stopped portion of the road for the benefit of any utility companies that have assets located on, over, or under that land.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The owners of 1 McAuley Road have a building partially encroaching onto an unformed portion of Beaconsfield Road at their property frontage. 

4      The current owner has now applied for a road stopping in order to regularise this current encroachment.

DISCUSSION

Impact on the Transport Network

5      The site proposed for stopping is at the top of a steep bank. The road stopping will result in a slightly narrowed legal road width, however due to the steep topography it is not foreseen to be required for Council or community purposes in the future.  The proposed boundary forms a straight line between the adjacent parcels and so forms a logical boundary.  There is a sufficient legal width remaining to be consistent with current Dunedin City Council Code of Subdivision requirements. 

6      The proposed area to stop is shown in blue in the plan below.  The area concerned is approximately 283m².  Photograph 2 shows the general location of the subject area with the area concerned in red. 

 

7      McAuley Road is classified as a Local Road in the Dunedin City District Plan and has 251 average daily vehicle movements at this point, which is considered low volume.

8      The stopping will not result in any change to the existing formed road layout. 

9      The impact of the proposed stopping on the road network is considered to be less than minor.

10    Preliminary consultation has been conducted with adjacent property owners, Utility Operators, the Otago Peninsula Community Board and affected Council departments.  This has not raised any likely objections. 

Programme and budget

11    If the recommendation in this report is approved:

·           The applicant will be charged the road stopping fee (non-refundable) and will be required to sign an agreement concerning payment of any additional costs related to the road stopping.

·           In accordance with Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974 the Council will commission a survey and valuation of land concerned.

·           Council will issue a public consultation notice for the proposed stopping.

·           A report will be prepared for Council containing the outcome of consultation and a recommendation for whether the stopping should proceed.

·           If the stopping is concluded successfully the land will be transferred to the applicant and rates charged on this land from the following year.

12    At each stage the applicant will have the opportunity to continue or cease the stopping process, e.g. if objections are received.

13    The current Road Stopping Policy, adopted in January 2012, specifies that the applicant is to pay the cost of the stopping and pay for the value of the land.  However the fees and charges in place at the time of this application did not reflect the policy.

14    In good faith, Council is processing this road stopping application in accordance with the fees and charges that were adopted at the time the application was made. The recommended option in this report is for the applicant to pay the value of the land or the cost of the stopping, whichever is greater, as specified in the Annual Plan fees and charges at the time this application was received.

15    The applicant will be required to reimburse the Council for the actual costs involved in the stopping regardless of whether or not the stopping reaches a conclusion.  Such costs include survey, valuation, public notices, relocation of assets, legal and transfer costs, and registering of any easements over the land for the benefit of any utility operators.  At the conclusion of the stopping, costs will be reconciled against the value of the land as detailed in the recommendation.

Options

Option One – Recommended Option - Proceed with public notification of the intention to stop a portion of McAuley Road

 

16    As there appears to be no impediments to the proposal, Council may proceed to public consultation.

Advantages

·      The proposal allows the property owner to legalise the existing encroachment and increases the rateable area of land.

·      Access to the property by utility companies is retained for existing utilities with appropriate registration of easements on the property title.

Disadvantages

·      The land would be unavailable for use by other members of the public and utility companies.

Option Two – Status Quo - Decline the road stopping application

17    Council resolves not to proceed with the proposal to stop the road.

Advantages

·      The land would remain available for the use by the property owner and other members of the public or utility companies in the event that it is needed.

Disadvantages

·      On-going encroachment and the loss of future rates for the stopped road.

NEXT STEPS

18    If the recommendation is approved, the applicant will be required to pay the fee for processing a road stopping, and sign an agreement regarding payment of all costs.  Staff will complete valuation and survey work and consult on the proposal before reporting back to Council.

 

Signatories

Author:

Michael Tannock - Transport Network Team Leader

Authoriser:

Richard Saunders - Acting Group Manager Transport

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This proposal relates to providing a regulatory function and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

There is no contribution relating to the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Proactive management of the transportation network supports social and economic sustainability

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

There are no financial impacts as costs incurred in the process are met by the applicant.

Significance

This decision is considered of low significance under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

Initial consultation has been undertaken with Chorus NZ, Vodafone NZ, 2degrees Mobile, Aurora Energy Limited, Vocus Communications (FX Networks) and adjacent landowners.  No objections have been received at this time.

Engagement – internal

Transport, Parks and Recreation, Customer and Regulatory Services, Community and Planning Group, Planning and Urban Design, Property and Water and Waste Services have been consulted.  The In-House Legal Counsel were consulted in the drafting of this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no significant risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest.

Community Boards

The Otago Peninsula Community Board was consulted and supports the proposal.