Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Planning and Environment Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                             Tuesday 11 April 2017

Time:                            1.30 pm (or at the conclusion of the previous meeting, whichever is later)

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers,

                                      The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Planning and Environment Committee

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr David Benson-Pope

 

Deputy Chairpersons

Cr Damian Newell

Cr Conrad Stedman

Members

Mayor Dave Cull

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Jim O'Malley

 

Cr Chris Staynes

Cr Lee Vandervis

 

Cr Andrew Whiley

Cr Kate Wilson

 

Senior Officer                               Sandy Graham (General Manager Strategy and Governance)   

 

Governance Support Officer      Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

Lynne Adamson

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Lynne.Adamson@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Planning and Environment Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Public Forum                                                                                             4

1.1   Scott Willis                                                                                        4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5      

Part A Reports (Committee  has power to decide these matters)

5          Planning and Environment Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 31 December 2016                                                                                       15

6        DCC Emissions Measurement, Management, and Reduction Update 2015/16        25

7        Items for Consideration by the Chair            

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                             51

 

 


Planning and Environment Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

1     Public Forum

1.1  Scott Willis

Scott Willis, wishes to address the meeting concerning Climate Safe Housing.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Planning and Environment Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Planning and Environment Committee Register of Interest - April 2017

7

  



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Planning and Environment Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Part A Reports

 

Planning and Environment Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 31 December 2016

Department: Community and Planning and Customer and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Committee on activities including city planning, resource consents, building services, alcohol licensing, environmental health, animal control and parking enforcement.

1     RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Planning and Regulatory Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 31 December 2016.

 

 

BACKGROUND

2      The Community and Planning group of activities works with other agencies to set the direction for managing Dunedin’s built and natural environment, and is responsible for promoting the sustainable management of the natural and physical resources through its administration of the functions of the Council under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).

3      Regulatory Services contributes directly to the Safe and Healthy City outcome and enhances personal safety in relation to building services, animal services, health licensing, the sale and supply of alcohol and parking enforcement.

DISCUSSION

Service and Satisfaction

 

4      The Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS) is the principal mechanism by which the Council measures resident satisfaction with a wide range of its activities.

5      From July 2016 the ROS has been conducted on a continuous monthly basis, aiming to obtain around 100 responses each month, to replicate the average annual sample size of around 1,200 obtained in previous years.  The quarterly results in the graphs below generally reflect the responses of around 300 residents. A sample of 300 has an expected 95% confidence interval (margin of error) of +/- 5.7%, whereas the annual result for 2015/16 had a margin of error of +/-2.5%. Results for the year will continue to be published in the annual ROS report at year end.

6      A 5% increase in satisfaction with ‘overall look and feel of the city' was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the previous quarter. 

7      The ROS for 2015/16 introduced a question about ‘overall satisfaction with regulatory services’ as well as specific questions about the control of dogs, noise and parking.  An 8% increase in satisfaction was reported in the quarter ended December when compared to the 2015/16 result.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value and Efficiency

 

Resource consents

8      The graph shows on a monthly basis resource consent processing over the last five year up to February 2017. The blue line shows the percentage meeting the statutory deadline; ranges from 97 to 100. The red line show the number of resource consents granted each month. It shows there can be a quite a bit of fluctuation. The low points are the December and January period when many staff takes holidays.

Building consents

9      Building Consents activity at the end of 2016 year represented the highest number of consents issued for the past six years. Staff issued 18% more building consents over 2016, than in 2015. The 2016 value of the consents totalled $402.5 million, which is approximately twice the average total value of the past five years.

10    The quarter saw the employment of the new Building Solutions Manager, support provided for the Kaikoura earthquakes and the introduction of a benchmarking exercise with other councils.   

11    Recruitment continued with the appointment of two Building consents processing officers in early January, with further recruitment planned for the first quarter in 2017. Consents issued within statutory timeframes continued to improve during the period supported by some staff overtime, continued outsourcing of applications to external contractors, engaging contractors to work in-house and redeploying resources from territorial authority functions to Building Consent Authority functions.

Alcohol Licensing

12    The format of the alcohol licensing data is being reviewed and has been omitted from this report until the content and format is finalised. 

Environmental Health

13    The majority of Dunedin food premises are now operating under the new risk based management system, enabling them to implement higher food safety standards.  This is the main driver for the high number of “A” graded food premises for the quarter ending 31 December 2016.

 

Environmental Health – Noise

14    The rise in noise complaints during the month of October relates to the end of the 2016 student year. Noise complaints are generally higher at the year end. The reduction in complaints during November and December correlates with students leaving the city. There is an increase in resident satisfaction with the noise control service in the city at this time (as measured by the Residents’ Opinion Survey - ROS).

Animal Services

15    There was a noticeable spike in customer service requests for Animal Services in October, with numbers in November and December lower than 2015.

 

 

 

 

Parking Services

16    There was an increase in the number of infringements over this three month period compared with 2015/16.

17    The number of service requests for parking enforcement, commercial use of footpaths, blocked vehicle entrances and leased car parks decreased over the period, correlating with the officers spending more time monitoring and enforcing compliance in the city. An on-going review of the procedures in Parking Services has enabled the officers to spend more time undertaking enforcement.

 

 

 

 

 

Major Initiatives

18    The following section is not confined to the October to December 2016 and also provides updates on the current status of the initiatives.

Annual Plan

19    The main activity in the quarter was the review of budgets for the 2017/18 year and preparation of content for the January Annual Plan Council meeting. The January Annual Plan material was simplified and a new approach to presentation was trialled, using reports by operational group and supplying the content in an electronic format.  After reviewing the budgets an overall rates rise of 3% was proposed with a spend of around $240 million in 2017/18. 

20    The current focus is on community engagement. The consultation period runs from 30 March to 1 May. An information document, and associated information such as fees and charges, is now available at www.dunedin.govt.nz/2017AP. The Council is taking a different approach to how it seeks feedback on what should be included in the 2017/18 Annual Plan. There will be no formal hearings, but there will be a variety of ways for people to have their say. There are two new events where people can talk directly to Councillors – a community conversation with stakeholders and the public, and the chance to chat with Councillors over a cup of tea.

Long Term Plan 2018

21    The LTP project was advanced in late 2016, including:  establishing project sponsors, managers and work streams; reviewing lessons learnt during 2015-25 LTP process and previous Annual Plans; providing a Councillor induction around LTPs, Annual Plans and Annual Reports; and conducting a review and stocktake of strategic documents to inform community outcomes for the next LTP.

22    The current focus is on developing key work to support the Council in its strategic direction setting, including aligning community outcomes and the strategic framework and developing the city profile and significant forecasting assumptions.  A series of workshops have been scheduled between May and December this year with elected members as LTP work progresses.

Proposed Second Generation Dunedin City District Plan (2GP)

23    Hearings on the 2GP commenced in October 2016 with Plan Overview, Heritage, Residential, Rural Residential and Natural Hazard hearings held in the quarter. Hearings and deliberations are ongoing. The hearings are scheduled to conclude in July with the target for release of decisions in September 2017. 

Te Ao Tūroa – The Natural World, Dunedin’s Environment Strategy

24    The Te Ao Tūroa Partnership has been established and its membership confirmed. Implementation work began in late 2016 and includes:

·      The Backyard Biodiversity action to raise awareness and build the community’s scientific knowledge

·      Support for the University of Otago research project ‘Engaging people in biodiversity management’

·      Input to the Dunedin Destination Plan to include the development of a visitor management plan to protect areas of special ecological and wildlife value from increased visitor numbers and

·      Researching and developing measures for monitoring the health of biodiversity and ecosystems.

25    Current work includes: raising profile of Te Ao Tūroa within the community by taking forward two flagship projects (Backyard Biodiversity and Environment Envoy); exploring potential work with Predator Free Dunedin aimed at landscape-scale predator control; taking forward weed control and planting in the Town Belt as a part of the Town Belt Boost project; and developing collaboration with Landcare Research regarding farmland biodiversity monitoring and management. Next steps include continuing to meet and work with the Te Ao Turoa Partnership to consider the future actions to deliver on the strategy.  

Tertiary Precinct Planning and Co-ordination

26    Collaboration with key partners on long term planning for the tertiary precinct continues. The Tertiary Precinct Development Plan (the Plan), developed in 2008 following stakeholder consultation, is being reviewed. The Plan focuses on the development of Dunedin’s tertiary precinct and addresses the commitment from the Dunedin City Council, Otago Polytechnic, University of Otago, the Otago Regional Council, the Southern District Health Board and Otago Museum ‘to work together to contribute to the creation of a quality, sustainable campus environment and a vibrant tertiary precinct, ensuring Dunedin City Council’s place as the Education Capital of New Zealand.’

27    The first part of the review assessed progress on the actions in the Plan. Of the 86 existing actions, 76 have been completed, are in progress or an alternative solution has been found. The next stage will be reviewing the future priorities and identifying key actions to deliver on those priorities.

28    The tertiary precinct safety and accessibility upgrade has been a key focus of the partners. The upgrade aims to improve the safety and accessibility of the tertiary precinct with particular emphasis on the streetscape and the pedestrian and cycling environment. For the DCC this is an unfunded project in the 2015/16-2024/25 Long Term Plan. Staff are continuing to work with partners to scope funding requirements and timing, and will report these for consideration by Council for the development of the 2018/19-2027/28 Long Term Plan.

Capital Projects

Central City Plan

29    November to December were spent finalising designs for the Warehouse Precinct Stage 2 (Jetty Street) and developing detailed concept plans for Stage 3 (Bond Street) of the Warehouse Precinct. Significant urban design efforts were needed to ensure a successful delivery of Warehouse Precinct physical works as the first ‘urban quarter’ of the CCP.

30    The Transport and City Development teams have been working with consultants Boffa Miskell to assess the Central City Plan works to date. The next steps include mapping a strategic way forward for 2017 and getting an appropriate project structure in place for the delivery phase.

OPTIONS

31    As this is an update report there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

32    A further update report will be provided after the conclusion of the next quarter. The priorities for the next quarter are the Annual Plan consultation, refining the program for the Central City Plan and completing the hearings on the 2GP.                   

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Adrian Blair - Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Planning and Environment portfolio of activities support the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

As an update report, there are no specific implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

As an update report there are no implications for the LTP, although some measures are level of service performance measures annually reported as part of the LTP.

Financial considerations

The updates reported are within existing operating and capital budgets.

Significance

This decision is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

As an update report no external engagement has been undertaken.

Engagement - internal

As an update report no internal engagement has been undertaken. Input to the major initiatives and project updates has been provided by teams within Regulatory Services and Community and Planning Groups, with the Group Manager Transport also providing input regarding the Central City Plan. 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Not applicable.

 


Planning and Environment Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

 

DCC Emissions Measurement, Management, and Reduction Update 2015/16

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the Dunedin City Council’s (DCC) 2015/16 Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory report. It also provides information on the upcoming review of the Emissions Management and Reduction Plan and the inclusion of the Supply Chain GHG Emissions Review as part of the 2016/17 GHG Emissions Inventory.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the report titled DCC Emissions Measurement, Management and Reduction Update 2015/16.

 

 

BACKGROUND

2      The Certified Emissions Management and Reduction Scheme (CEMARS) is an emission measurement and management scheme run by Enviro-Mark, a subsidiary of Landcare Research. The programme provides a robust, internationally-certified method to measure, manage and reduce organisational emissions.

3      The DCC first measured its operational emissions through the CEMARS scheme in 2010. The emissions inventory was verified, but no emissions reduction plan was put in place and participation in the scheme lapsed.

4      In 2014, staff resumed this work.  DCC emissions for 2013/14 were measured and an Emissions Management and Reduction Plan (EMRP) was developed. The 2013/14 inventory was established as the base year, and the first DCC EMRP (for the period 2015-17 inclusive) was approved by the Executive Leadership Team in early 2015.

5      The DCC was only the second local council in New Zealand to become certified through CEMARS, and the first large council.

6      To comply with CEMARS membership and certification, the DCC must produce an emissions inventory every year and an updated EMRP every three years.

DISCUSSION

7      The emissions sources included in this inventory are classified into the following three categories:

a)     Direct GHG emissions (Scope 1): GHG emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the entity.

b)     Indirect GHG emissions (Scope 2): GHG emissions from the generation of purchased electricity, heat and steam consumed by the entity.

c)     Indirect GHG emissions (Scope 3): GHG emissions required by the programme that occur as a consequence of the activities of the entity but occur from sources not owned or controlled by the entity. Inclusion of the Scope 3 emissions sources is done on a case-by-case basis.

8      The emissions sources were identified with reference to the methodology described in the GHG Protocol and ISO14064-1:2006 standards and the categories were adapted from the GHG Protocol. The GHG protocol is a widely used international accounting tool for governments and business leaders to measure and manage their greenhouse gas emissions. The emissions sources included in DCC's GHG emissions inventory are set out in detail in Table 11 (page 10-13) of the Emission Inventory Report (Attachment A).

2015/16 Emissions Inventory Results

9      To measure the DCC’s operational emissions for 2015/16, data was collected from activities across the organisation, including: Fleet Operations, Finance, Parks and Recreation, Transport and Water and Waste. The resulting emissions inventory for 2015/16 has been audited and verified by Enviro-Mark as totalling 31,061.71 tCO2e – the equivalent of 250 kgCO2e per resident and 560 kgCO2e per rateable property. The largest emission sources were:

·      Landfilled waste: 22,480 tCO2e (72.4% of DCC emissions)

·      Electricity: 5,037 tCO2e (16.2%)

·      Commercial LPG: 1,928 tCO2e (6.2%)

10    It is important to note that landfill emissions calculated through CEMARS are based on the Ministry for the Environment Guidance for Voluntary Greenhouse Gas Reporting (2014), which takes into account known waste composition and default factors for landfill gas recovery systems. This is different to the emissions reported under the Emissions Trading Scheme which are based on a Unique Emissions Factor that takes into account known waste composition but not landfill gas recovery.

11    The total gross emissions for 2015/16 was 1615.11 tCO2e or 5.5% higher than the previous year, and was 2953.40 tCO2e or 10.5% higher than the 2013/14 year. Scope one emissions increased by 1,708.47 tCO2e or 7.1%, while scope two and scope three emissions decreased by 28.04 tCO2e (0.6%) and 65.34 tCO2e (14.3%) respectively. Emissions sources that increased this year include landfilled waste (6.6%), commercial LPG (11%), commercial diesel (28%), taxi use (23%) and petrol for Citifleet (regular unleaded, 6%).

Emissions Management and Reduction Plan

12    As required under the CEMARS scheme, the EMRP will need to be reviewed and updated in preparation for the audit of the 2016/17 GHG inventory. The actions outlined in the EMRP will need to be updated in terms of progress or completion, and new actions can be added into the plan.

13    Staff will review the plan and update as necessary. A draft of the updated plan will be presented to the Executive Leadership Team for approval prior to submission for audit. Once the plan is verified through audit, it will be presented to Council along with the results of the 2016/17 GHG inventory.

Scope Three Supplier Emissions

14    The DCC contracts with many suppliers, and as a result is indirectly responsible for the GHG emissions emitted as a consequence of these activities. There is opportunity for the DCC to estimate these GHG emissions by undertaking the 'Supply Chain Greenhouse Gas Emissions Review'. Phase one of the review requires calculating the emissions emitted by suppliers based on the operational expenditure on suppliers' contracted services. This is designed to be a high level assessment which will provide an initial estimation of supplier emissions. This information will then feed into recommendations on the potential next steps.

15    Once the DCC has finished the first phase, it may choose to progress to phases two, three and four of the review. Phase two requires engaging with suppliers and communicating potential ways to reduce their carbon footprint. Phase three investigates ways to incorporate GHG efficiency into the procurement process. Phase four furthers the engagement with suppliers, including potential benchmarking, measurement and management of their emissions through the verification process.

16    It is planned to conduct phase one of the first supply chain review this year in conjunction with the work for the 2016/17 GHG inventory. This process will be incorporated into the audit and verification process for the GHG inventory at no extra cost to the DCC. The results will be presented in a report to Council along with the results of the 2016/17 GHG inventory and the updated EMRP.

OPTIONS

17    There are no options as this report is for noting.

NEXT STEPS

18    The 2016/17 GHG emissions inventory will be compiled this year for audit and, when verified through audit, will be provided to the Council, along with the updated EMRP and the Supply Chain GHG Emissions Review results.

 

Signatories

Author:

Jessie Wu - Policy Advisor

Authoriser:

Maria Ioannou - Corporate Policy Manager

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

DCC Emissions Inventory Report 2015/16

30

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing local infrastructure and public services and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The CEMARS programme helps the DCC to measure, manage and reduce its GHG emissions contribution. Continuing this commitment will contribute to a number of goals that relate to lowering Dunedin's carbon footprint and minimising waste, as well as other Council directives including Invest to Save and energy management.

Māori Impact Statement

No known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Managing and reducing operational greenhouse gas emissions will achieve sustainability goals by reducing costs and reducing the DCC’s contribution to climate change, which has local impacts.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

If investigatory actions of the EMRP result in viable business cases for investments, these will go to the Executive Leadership Team and the Council for consideration for funding.

Financial considerations

The cost for CEMARS certification has been funded to date from the Climate Change and Sustainability budget but it may be appropriate for there to be  a separate budget for this work in the 2018/19 Long Term Plan  as the call on the Climate Change budget for adaptation work is significant.

Significance

This report has been assessed to be of low significance in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff provided data input for the inventory in preparation for the audit.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no specific implications for Community Boards.

 

 


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Planning and Environment Committee

11 April 2017

 

 

Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

 

That the Planning and Environment Committee:

 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, exclude the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

 

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Review of Organisations with Betting / Gaming Licences In Receipt of Rates Relief Grants

S7(2)(c)(ii)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.