Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                             Tuesday 30 May 2017

Time:                            1.00 pm

Venue:                          Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers,

                                      The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Chris Staynes

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Damian Newell

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Cr Kate Wilson

 

 

Senior Officer                               Sue Bidrose, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer      Pam Jordan

 

 

 

Pam Jordan

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Pam.Jordan@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Opening                                                                                                   4

2        Public Forum                                                                                             4

2.1   Public Forum - Cosy Homes Update                                                        4

2.2   Public Forum - Unregistered Accommodation                                           4

2.3   Public Forum - Freedom Camping                                                          4

2.4   Public Forum - Freedom Camping                                                          4

2.5   Public Forum - Cameras in North Dunedin                                               4

3        Apologies                                                                                                  4

4        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

5        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5

6        Confirmation of Minutes                                                                             15

6.1   Ordinary Council meeting - 1 May 2017                                                 15  

Minutes of Committees

7          Bylaws Subcommittee - 14 March 2017                                                        25

Minutes of Community Boards

8          Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board - 3 May 2017                                               42

9        Otago Peninsula Community Board - 20 April 2017                                          48

10      Saddle Hill Community Board - 4 May 2017                                                    55

11      Strath Taieri Community Board - 20 April 2017                                               65

12      Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 19 April 2017                                         71

Reports

13        Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017                                                              78

14      Review of Camping Control Bylaw 2015                                                       119

15      Part Town Belt - Accessway, Queens Drive to Ross Street - proposed Easement 174

16      Part Town Belt - Queens Drive to Wallace Street proposed Easement               183

17      Long Term Plan 2018: Update and First Round of Supporting Documents           192

18      Appointment of Representative on the Regional Transport Committee               267

19      Appointment of members to the District Licensing Committee                          269

20      Dunedin Hospital SOS Update                                                                    271

21      Remuneration Authority - Consultation document                                          277               

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                           315

 

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

1     Opening

Reverend Siosifa Pole, Superintendent of the Dunedin Methodist Parish, will open the meeting with a prayer.

2     Public Forum

2.1  Public Forum - Cosy Homes Update

Jordana Whyte, Project Manager, Cosy Homes, wishes to provide the Council with an update on the work of Cosy Homes and where additional need is being seen in the community.

2.2  Public Forum - Unregistered Accommodation

Sue Rhodes, President, Otago Motel Association, wishes to address the meeting about the Association's concerns about unregistered accommodation.

2.3  Public Forum - Freedom Camping

Rhys Owen wishes to address the meeting concerning freedom camping.

2.4  Public Forum - Freedom Camping

Geraldine Tait, Waikouaiti Coast Community Board wishes to address the meeting concerning Freedom Camping.

2.5  Public Forum - Cameras in North Dunedin

Paul Gourlie wishes to address the meeting concerning Cameras in North Dunedin.

3     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

4     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Register of Interest

7

  



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Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council meeting - 1 May 2017

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 1 May 2017 as a correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Ordinary Council meeting  held on 1 May 2017

16

 

 



 

Council

MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council held in the Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin on Monday 1 May 2017, commencing at 12.00 noon

 

PRESENT

 

Mayor

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Damian Newell

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Cr Kate Wilson

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Sue Bidrose (Chief Executive Officer), Graham McKerracher (Manager, Council Communications and Marketing), Richard Saunders (Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Networks), Nicola Pinfold (Group Manager Community and Planning), Jendi Paterson (Recreation Planning and Facilities Manager), Andrea Jones (Communications Team Leader), Jamie Shaw (Senior Communications Advisor), Joy Gunn (Manager Events and Community Development), Vicki Kestila (Masters Games Manager), Tom Dyer (Acting Group Manager Parks and Recreation), Maria Ioannou (Corporate Policy Manager) and Andrew Slater (Risk and Internal Audit Manager).

 

Governance Support Officer      Pam Jordan

 

 

1       Opening

Jane Beecroft, Dunedin Hare Krishna Community, opened the meeting with a prayer.

2       Public Forum

2.1    Public Forum - Council Communications Standards and Policy

 

Diane Yeldon addressed the meeting concerning Standards for Council Communication.  She had pre-circulated a presentation which asked the Council to consider adopting the principles in the Office of the Auditor-General's publication, "Good Practice for Managing Public Communications by Local Authorities".  In the document Ms Yeldon also commented on the Dunedin Hospital SOS Campaign resolution, the material produced for the campaign, and questioned whether it was a justified expense.

Ms Yeldon responded to questions from Councillors.

Cr Doug Hall left the meeting at 12.10 pm.

Cr Conrad Stedman entered the meeting at 12.11 pm.

There was discussion on the Dunedin Hospital SOS campaign and how it was funded.

 

2.2    Public Forum - Logan Park All-Weather Facility

 

Chris Wright (Chief Executive) and Matthew Holdridge (Chairman) of Football South addressed the meeting concerning the Logan Park All-Weather Facility Project and circulated a proposal.

Cr Doug Hall returned to the meeting at 12.14 pm.

Messrs Wright and Holdridge advised that Football South had completed a feasibility study and was on track for an exciting investment in football in the city.  They were working with Council on the project and thanked those involved, in particular the Parks and Recreation team.  Numbers of those involved in football were outlined, which included players, referees, helpers etc. 

It was proposed to build a dual turf multi-sport surface at Logan Park.  One surface would be dedicated to football and the other would cater for many sports.  The facility would cost $3 million to build and have 25,000 users per annum.  Fundraising had commenced and it was also hoped that the Council would contribute $1 million in the coming financial year.  Football South was looking for Council to support the facility so the rest of the funding (eg from FIFA) could be locked in.  Applications would be made to other bodies once a threshold was reached. 

The Football South representatives responded to questions from Councillors.

Mayor Cull requested Football South to provide a comprehensive proposal to staff as soon as possible so it could be considered during Annual Plan discussions.

 

3       Apologies

 

Moved (Mayor Dave Cull/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Council:

 

Accepts the apology from Cr Chris Staynes. 

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/087)

 

4       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Mayor Dave Cull/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Council:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/088)

 

 

5       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Dave Cull/Cr Rachel Elder):

That the Council:

 

a)     Notes the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A of the report; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/089)

 

6       Confirmation of Minutes

6.1    Ordinary Council meeting - 28 March 2017

 

Moved (Mayor Dave Cull/Cr Damian Newell):

That the Council:

 

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 28 March 2017 as a correct record.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/090)

  

Minutes of Committees

7       Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee - 10 April 2017

 

Moved (Cr Kate Wilson/Cr Jim O'Malley):

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items (1-9) and public forum of the minutes of the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee meeting held on 10 April 2017.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/091)

 

8       Community and Culture Committee - 11 April 2017

 

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Marie Laufiso):

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items (1-12) and public forum of the minutes of the Community and Culture Committee meeting held on 11 April 2017.

b)     Takes Part C items of the minutes of the Community and Culture Committee held on 11 April 2017, in the non-public part of the meeting.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/092)

 

9       Planning and Environment Committee - 11 April 2017

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Council:

 

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Planning and Environment Committee held on 11 April 2017 as a correct record.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/093)

 

Minutes of Community Boards

10     West Harbour Community Board - 15 March 2017

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Council:

 

a)     Notes the minutes of the West Harbour Community Board meeting held on 15 March 2017.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/094)

 

11     Saddle Hill Community Board - 16 March 2017

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Saddle Hill Community Board meeting held on 16 March 2017.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/095)

 

Reports

12     Masters Games Service Level Agreement and Statement of Intent 2016 - 2018

 

A report from Community and Planning presented the Statement of Intent (SOI) and Service Level Agreement (SLA) for the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust for approval.

The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust was a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO), but had historically been exempted from the standard reporting requirements of a CCO.  However, the Trust Board voluntarily submitted a Statement of Intent and Service Level Agreement, a Pre-Games report and Post Games report to Council biennially. 

There had been no changes made to the SOI since Council approved this in June 2015.  There had been one minor change to the Service Level Agreement in relation to the DCC management reporting line, since this document was last approved by Council in June 2015.

 

Staff responded to questions from Councillors.

 

Cr Doug Hall left the meeting from 12.55 pm to 1.01 pm during the course of discussion.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Damian Newell):

That the Council:

 

a)     Approves the 2016 – 2018 Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust Statement of Intent.

b)     Approves the 2016 – 2018 Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust Service Level Agreement.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/096)

 

13     Proposed DCC Carbon Management Policy

 

A report from Community and Planning and Strategy and Governance advised that changes to the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) would double the quantity of carbon credits ('NZUs') the Council needed to meet its ETS landfill liabilities, by 1 January 2019.  This impact was further exacerbated by the increasing cost of credits.  The market price of NZUs increased from around $7 in mid-2015 to $13.50 in April 2016, and trading was now at around $17.50 per NZU.  An NZU price cap of $25 remained in place under the ETS.

In addition to ETS liabilities, the Council had a number of carbon management obligations embedded within its Strategic Framework, sector initiatives and business activity plans, which placed increasing demands on responsible carbon management and reduction efforts.

The report built on a report considered at the Council meeting of 23 January 2017 that provided a range of options to address the anticipated phase-out of the transitional (one-for-two) treatment for landfill emission liabilities under the ETS.

Subsequent to the January 2017 report and Council resolution, a number of minor changes were made to the Policy wording, and the proposed DCC Carbon Management Policy was referred to the Te Ao Tūroa Partnership for comment.

The final version of the Carbon Management Policy was now proposed for Council adoption.

 

Staff responded to questions from Councillors.

 

There was discussion on the policy and its implications, and whether contractors should be included.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Damian Newell):

That the Council:

 

a)     Adopts the Carbon Management Policy attached to the report.

Division

The Council voted by division.

 

For:          Crs David Benson-Pope, Rachel Elder, Christine Garey, Doug Hall, Aaron Hawkins, Marie Laufiso, Mike Lord, Damian Newell, Jim O'Malley, Conrad Stedman, Kate Wilson and Mayor Dave Cull (12).

Against:     Crs Lee Vandervis and Andrew Whiley (2).

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 2

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/097)

 

 

Resolution to exclude the public

Moved (Mayor Dave Cull/Cr Aaron Hawkins):

That the Council:

 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, exclude the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Ordinary Council meeting - 28 March 2017 - Public Excluded

S7(2)(h)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

 

S7(2)(b)(ii)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

 

S7(2)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

 

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S7(2)(b)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would disclose a trade secret.

 

S7(2)(g)

The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

 

S7(2)(c)(ii)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

 

S7(2)(c)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

 

S6(b)

The making available of the information would be likely to endanger the safety of a person.

 

S7(2)(j)

The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2  Community and Culture Committee - 11 April 2017 - Public Excluded

S7(2)(j)

The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 

C3  Planning and Environment Committee - 11 April 2017 - Public Excluded

S7(2)(c)(ii)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C4  Proposed Road Stopping - Part Ings Avenue, Dunedin

S7(2)(g)

The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

This report is confidential because it provides details of the Council's legal position, which may need to be relied on if the Council cannot obtain affected landowners' agreement.

C5  Proposed Leases of Parts Park and Recreation Land to Various Lessees

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S7(2)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

To protect the privacy of the proposed lessees and to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage negotiations regarding the proposed leases.

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/098)

 

 

The meeting moved into confidential at 1.32 pm.

 

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Minutes of Committees

Bylaws Subcommittee - 14 March 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the minutes of the Bylaws Subcommittee meeting held on 14 March 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Bylaws Subcommittee held on 14 March 2017

26

  



 

Bylaws Subcommittee

Reserves and Beaches Bylaw

MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Bylaws Subcommittee (Reserves and Beaches Bylaw) held in the Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin on Tuesday 14 March 2017, commencing at 9.05 am, Wednesday 15 March 2017 commencing at 9.00 am, Tuesday 21 March 2017 commencing at 9.10 am and Wednesday 5 April 2017 commencing at 9.10 am

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Senior Officer                                       Kristy Rusher (Manager Civic and Legal)

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Ashley Reid (Parks and Recreation Planner)

 

Governance Support Officer      Pam Jordan

 

 

 

 

1       Apologies

There were no apologies.

 

2       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration.

 

Motion carried (BYL/2017/001)

 

 

3       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Crs Andrew Whiley and Conrad Stedman noted that they were Council-appointed representatives on the Otago Peninsula Community Board and Saddle Hill Community Board respectively, and would withdraw in respect of those submissions.  Councillor Stedman also advised that he was a member of the St Clair Surf Lifesaving Club. 

 

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Subcommittee:

 

a)     Notes the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A of the report; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (BYL/2017/002)

 

Reports

4       Proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw - Summary of Submissions

 

The proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 went out for public consultation on 9 January 2017. Four hundred and thirty three submissions were received and 80 submitters requested to speak at the submissions hearing.  The report summarised the details of the submissions for consideration by the Hearings Subcommittee.

 

The Subcommittee heard from the following submitters:

 

Craig Wilson, Department of Conservation

 

Mr Wilson commented on his organisation's close working relationship with the Council.  As statutory managers of coastal areas they worked closely together.  DOC supported the inclusion of beaches, but felt that the definition should also include all coastal areas such as rocky shores.  He asked for Shelly Beach not to be added to the areas where horses were allowed.  He considered that permits should be required to fly drones anywhere within the coastal area for reasons of sensitivity.  It was important for restrictions to be effectively communicated to the public.

 

Quinton Prendergast, Pony Club

 

Mr Prendergast was submitting on his own behalf and that of his teenage daughters and others who used beaches for horse riding.  He was concerned about restrictions on riding horses on beaches but now understood that the area below the high tide mark was under ORC jurisdiction.  He explained that people took horses and ponies to reserves etc for safety reasons.  There were also therapeutic reasons to take horses to the beach as salt water was good for wounds and for tendons.  The beach from Island Park to Ocean View generally had low use but was used a lot by horses and trainers.  Everyone who used the area used common sense.  Accessways and cutaways allowed wind to escape.  There was no evidence that horses caused erosion.  It was also common sense that dogs could be there and there was no reason for them to be in the dunes unless they were on a leash.  He was against vehicles on the sand dunes.  Mr Prendergast was of the view that Ocean View Reserve was a wonderful area for campers and visitors.

 

Sam Neill

 

Mr Neill commented that there was some confusion on whether Allans Beach was included in the bylaw and this needed to be clarified.  He had lived there his whole life and knew more about it than anyone.  There were fewer problems at Allans Beach than there ever had been previously and it was also used more than ever.  All horses and users of the beach had to go through their property and DOC land.  The Council only had jurisdiction over a small piece.  The beach was there to be shared and some walkers were very selfish.  Only a few surfers went through to the beach on quad bikes, plus themselves for farm purposes, and vehicles on the beach were not a problem.  Mr Neill was not keen on the use of drones at the beach.

 

Claire Carey

 

Ms Carey had been involved in the Save Aramoana campaign.  Aramoana was an unspoiled environment because people of previous generations had been prepared to fight for it.  There was now gradual intrusion and often unthinking carelessness.   Such effects could be cumulative.  One vehicle on a beach allowed others to do the same.  An individual's rights became subordinate to civic rights.  What was safe today needed to be defended.  People needed to be brave enough to resist pressures that degraded their lifestyle and take a stand.

 

Melissa Barnes

 

Ms Barnes advised that she was speaking specifically about Warrington Beach and thought all beaches needed to be looked at independently.  She considered that there was no evidence of damage done by horses on beaches, however vehicles caused damage.  The tide came in and washed away hoof prints.  She pointed out an area on Warrington Beach damaged by four wheel drives and asked why Warrington Beach was not on the list of beaches where horses were allowed to be ridden.  Ms Barnes considered that dogs should be on leashes in the dunes but could be off the leash on the beach if they were under control.  She requested Warrington Beach to be added to the list of beaches where horses were allowed.  She also considered that there was no need for anyone to be any further south than the surf club in vehicles and did not see why vehicles needed to go on the estuary.

 

Kevin McManus, President, Aorangi Hang Gliding Club

 

Mr McManus wished to comment specifically on Clause 17.  Hang gliders had been using Dunedin beaches for 44 years without disturbing other users.  Pilots were licenced and he believed that this made DCC rules unnecessary.  Many councils supported flying as it added to the ambiance of reserves and beaches.  He requested the bylaw to be amended to allow these activities to continue.

 

Janet Ledingham, Dunedin Branch of the Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society

 

Miss Ledingham made supplementary comments regarding Aramoana.  Currently horse treks took people along Big Beach.  She considered that any horse traffic should stick close to the high tide mark to avoid damage.  If there were designated horse areas there could be possible damage to ecological areas and disturbance to yellow-eyed penguins.  In regard to vehicle access at Aramoana, there was a problem when people drove down from the mole and went past the penguin colony. 

 

Heather Bell

 

Ms Bell lived at Warrington and found the Council's proposals confusing.  Warrington was a busy village and residents were good about horses in the village.  If there were problems in certain areas that were proven to be attributable to horses the Council should look at that.  If told about damage riders would take note and avoid particular areas.  She did not believe horses did damage to the sand dunes at Warrington.  Ms Bell asked for Warrington Beach to be added to the list of where horses could be ridden.  Ms Bell also pointed out the difference between damage caused by four wheel drives and horses.  She had seen damage caused by a small minority of vehicles.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 10.05 am to 10.45 am.

 

 

Jane Davidson

 

Ms Davidson made a PowerPoint presentation.  She was a Purakaunui/West Harbour resident against motorised vehicles on beaches and in favour of limiting vehicle access to avoid disturbing wildlife.  She noted that beaches were not reserves and commented on Long Beach and vehicle access.  Beaches were unique natural ecosystems, and not man made.  Long Beach was a breeding site of several families of sea lions.  She would like to ban all motorised vehicles from beaches.

 

Colin Weatherall

 

Mr Weatherall was a local Brighton resident and involved in surf lifesaving.  The majority of activities on beaches created issues.  The hard sand area was used for a lot of activities.  Patrolled areas operated between Labour Weekend and Easter.  Mr Weatherall support restrictions regarding drones but noted that surf lifesaving clubs were starting to use drones in their work as the larger ones could take a rescue tube and there was a need to provide for that.  Clubs also trained at lots of areas.  There was improved health and safety at events where drones were used to check on participants.  He believed that horses should be able to be on Westwood/Ocean View beaches.  The Council needed to take care that the bylaw did not get caught up in events eg vehicles at Brighton Gala Day.

 

Mr Weatherall also noted that boats needed access onto beaches for launching.  It was safe for recreational boaties to go through areas to launch, then come back out.  The coastline was challenging and emergency services must have access to beaches.  He also considered that access to beaches could be better marked. 

 

Guy Williams, Guy Williams and Associates, Conserving our Built Heritage

 

Mr Williams commented that definitions of aircraft may not cover hang gliders and paragliders and he completely supported those things.  Most landed on the area under Otago Regional Council jurisdiction.  Beaches were, by and large, lacking in population.  He was concerned regarding vehicle access.  It was permissible for vehicles to recover vessels but not hang gliders and equipment, and he considered it would be good if vehicles were able to access these areas for this purpose as well.

 

Scott Weatherall, Chairperson, Saddle Hill Community Board

 

Cr Conrad Stedman declared an interest as a member of the Saddle Hill Community Board and withdrew from the meeting at 11.15 am.

 

Mr Weatherall noted that people enjoyed organic gardening and he would like consideration to be given to people being able to take seaweed.  He commented that vehicles were needed for surf lifesaving events and did not want the bylaw to preclude them parking on the beach.  In terms of booking beaches for organised events, he did not see any issues if the Council continued to work with community groups.  He would also like weddings that took place in Brighton on the beach to be able to continue.  Mr Weatherall supported dogs being allowed to walk in the sand dunes but considered they should be restricted in areas of endangered wildlife.  Ocean View Beach should be looked at again in regard to dogs.

 

Mr Weatherall did not see any issues with drones being used.  He noted that horses had always used the beach area from Westwood to Brighton.  It was used for horse training and people learning to ride and the Board asked that should be allowed to continue.  There should be designated areas where there could be access through the dunes.  He suggested that horse owners could be asked to clean up horse droppings.

 

Cr Conrad Stedman returned to the meeting at 11.26 am.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting until the next submitter.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 11.26 am to 11.40 am.

 

 

Murray Brass, Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust

 

Cr David Benson-Pope declared an interest as a member of the Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust and withdrew from the meeting at 11.40 am.

 

The Trust was strongly supportive of the extension of the bylaw to include beaches as well as reserves.  There were complications in trying to control access points.  Extending the bylaw to beaches would give the Council more control.  The Trust supported controls on dogs to protect wildlife.  Mr Brass noted that drone use could impact on wildlife and supported controls.  Landowner approval was required for drones and it made sense to apply this requirement to beaches.  The Trust thought controls for horses should apply.  Points near dunes were where wildlife might be found and forcing horses to use this area might create conflicts.  Vehicle controls were required during breeding and Mr Brass suggested wording changes

 

In regard to particular beaches, there were some areas where penguins would return year after year, but wildlife often did unexpected things so it would be good to have the ability to impose temporary controls.

 

Cr David Benson-Pope returned to the meeting at 11.50 am.

 

Karen Anderson

 

Cr Andrew Whiley withdrew from the meeting at 12.03 pm and Cr David Benson-Pope took the Chair.

 

Ms Anderson tabled her comments and referred to points of procedure she had raised the previous day in relation to the Summary of Submissions, which had been amended in respect of a comment attributed to Ms Anderson after she had taken up the matter with staff.  The document also raised matters related to the interests of the Chairperson.

 

Ms Anderson also commented on issues related to the amendment of the Dog Control Bylaw, the number of submissions received and the topics they covered, and what she considered was a flawed process followed during the bylaw review.

 

Cr Andrew Whiley returned to the meeting at 12.14 pm and resumed the Chair.

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Andrew Whiley):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 12.15 pm to 1.10 pm.

 

 

Kelvin Lyon

 

Mr Lyon (from Warrington) spoke to his submission which included his background to his time living at Warrington and his horse riding.  He noted that he had never received any complaints regarding horses being ridden on the beach.  He also commented on a workshop that had been held regarding the use of the Warrington Domain and that there had been no negative comment.  He reported that there were a lot more campers than riders at the Domain and advised that he had seen a van driving up the Warrington Beach at lunchtime that day.  Riders would not want to be on the beach at the same time that there were surf lifesaving activities.  Mr Lyon would like the Subcommittee to give consideration to allowing horse riding along the beach for exercise activities.  Should areas be restricted, then the horse riding community could be consulted.  He thought that vehicles on the beach would disturb more sand than would horses.  He suggested that complaints would have to be monitored.  He also supported the restriction of vehicles on the beach apart from for specific purposes such as the retrieval of boats.

 

Allison Barty

 

Ms Barty spoke to her submission and commented that she had problems trying to understand the proposal.  She remarked on the changes and the reactions of people to this.  She advised that she was a horse rider and had requested maps of where she was able to ride.  She also commented on the website and communication with Council.  Ms Barty questioned matters relating to the timeframe for and enforcement of the bylaw, and communication of the changes.  She had concerns that horse riding representatives had not been included during the development of the bylaw.  Ms Barty was of the view that respect among beach users would go a long way.  She advised that she did not agree with vehicles on beaches unless they were authorised users.

 

Adrian Hall, Aramoana (Otago) Conservation Trust

 

Mr Hall spoke to the Aramoana Conservation Trust submission.  He commented on riders on the Aramoana Beach and their behaviour towards wildlife there, the wildlife at Aramoana and that Aramoana was a conservation area.  He considered that it was an exceptional and significant area.  He had concerns with vehicles on beaches, in particular potential conflict with nesting birds and sea lions.  He commented on land yachts, in particular at sun down when penguins returned to land, and that the number of nests had reduced from 18 to four in recent times.  He also advised of the number of injured penguins which came up the beach at all times of the day.  Mr Hall requested that vehicle access be restricted to protect wildlife.  He considered that there were boat ramps at other locations that the community could use.  Sea lions were breeding around the north area of the beach and he considered that they needed protection.  He asked the Council to consult with DOC.  Mr Hall also felt that horse riders should be encouraged to keep a reasonable distance from wildlife.  He considered that dogs should not be allowed beyond Bear Rock on Aramoana Beach because of the yellow-eyed penguins.

 

Maurice Prendergast

 

Mr Prendergast tabled and spoke to his submission, in particular about horses on beaches.  He commented on a resolution (September 2016) regarding a review of the bylaw, in particular the use of vehicles and dogs on reserves.  He commented that there had been no reference to horses anywhere in the report that went to elected members pre-election.  Mr Prendergast considered that horses should be allowed on beaches and advised that he had not witnessed inappropriate behaviour on beaches.

 

 

The meeting adjourned from 2.02 pm to 2.20 pm.

 

 

Shay Dewey, Southern Stringers Ltd

 

Mr Dewey ran a company dealing in video filming for corporate, news and commercial work, which had moved into use of drones in the last couple of years.  The proposed bylaw would affect the company's use of drones.  The current process was that initially staff would have to talk to the client regarding the drone flight, the flight would be logged with Air Share/CAA which would go to air traffic control.  Southern District Health Board permission was also needed if flying in a certain area.  This was not an efficient process and took some time, after which the occupants of properties that the drone would fly over needed to be spoken to.  This was already an involved process and was a process designed to control drones.  Everyone should be doing this, however most people did not know where and when they could fly and the rules in place.  There were already procedures and most beaches were controlled.  Education was needed rather than another permit.  Operators could not fly drones over groups of people, crowds, events etc. 

 

Mr Dewey considered that there were double standards as to how drones and other aircraft were perceived.  He explained the technicalities of control of air space and permissions to fly, the rules of flying, height restrictions etc, where people could fly without logging flights, where people could not fly eg above mammals where permits were needed from the Department of Conservation.

 

Tracey Morrison

 

Ms Morrison commented on horses on beaches and tabled photographs from her daughter.  She was concerned about a proposal that horses were only allowed above the high water tide mark.  This was strange as it was the area of softest sand and could damage horses' tendons.  These areas were also usually adjacent to sand dunes which required preservation.  The best place for horses was on firm sand at low tide.  It was increasingly more difficult to find safe places to ride horses.  The beach was one of her favourite places to ride.  Also race horses used beaches for training.  Horse riders did not upset other beach users or make them feel intimidated in any way as it was part of their way of life.  Ms Morrison tended to use Warrington and Ocean View beaches where there were established tracks through the dunes.

 

Debi Riddle

 

Ms Riddle lived in Brighton and she rode horses on the beach in all seasons at different times of day.  She was concerned regarding vehicles being disruptive on beaches, such as unlicensed dune buggies.  Narrow tracks for access to the beach had been widened by quad bikes and motorbikes.  The biggest problem was people using vehicles without regard to others.  Quad bikes smashed tracks in the sand dunes.  Uncontrolled dogs were also a problem and her horse had been injured getting away from a dog.  Speed limits on beaches were needed for safety reasons but also areas where people could exercise horses in a responsible manner.  Ms Riddle also commented on conflicts between horse floats trying to load and unload to access the beach, and freedom campers at Ocean View.

 

 

The meeting adjourned from 3.20 pm to 3.35 pm.

 

 

Jinty MacTavish, Landscape Connections Trust

 

Ms MacTavish commented on the Beyond Orokonui project and showed a map of the community landscape plan to manage ecological values in the area.  There was a range of projects including the Halo Project predator management project, and a network of traps to provide a buffer for the Orokonui Ecosanctuary.  Other projects were sea bird restoration concentrated around Mapoutahi, in response to the massacre of little blue penguins in the area in 2014.  The Trust wanted to express its support for inclusion of beaches in the Reserves Bylaw.  Conservation efforts relied on both beaches and reserves and needed consistency in management of those areas and this was also consistent with the proposed Parks and Recreation Strategy.  The Reserves Bylaw was a key tool in implementing the Strategy.  There was no objection to the Dog Bylaw so long as conservation values were considered as part of that project.

 

Emma Peters, Taieri District Pony Club

 

Ms Peters advised that the Pony Club had three branches and was concerned about parking and access issues to beaches.  The Club wanted to make sure that access to the listed beaches was maintained.  Other ones that people used for horses were Long Beach, Purakaunui, Murdering Beach, Doctors Point, Brighton and Taieri Mouth.  Club members were not interested in riding in the dunes apart from for access because of potential for damage to horses' legs.  They just wanted to make sure there was sufficient parking and access.

 

Glen Turner

 

Mr Turner considered that the change in restriction was a good compromise.  He commented on the use of drones and noted that there was no expectation of privacy when in a public place.  It was up to users and local authorities to educate people regarding expectations of privacy.  Small drones were not spying on people; this was not possible with small screens.  There was a limitation as to what could be seen with them.  Privacy should not be an issue.  If restrictions were made for drones, then cellphones and cameras would also have to be banned.

 

Mr Turner had been engaged to document changes at Aramoana and it would cause more damage to walk the area than to use drones.  People using drones were creative people doing good things.  He offered to show the Subcommittee his equipment and the limitations it had.  It was easier to change people's perception of what was being done if they were aware of it.  Rule changes would restrict what he was doing.  Mr Turner explained he was carrying out work at Shelly Beach, Aramoana, for the historic archives at the Port Chalmers Maritime Museum.  The main problems caused by drones were people using them in their neighbourhoods.

 

Paul McNamara

 

Mr McNamara commented on horses on beaches and proposed restrictions.  He noted that sand was soft at the mean high water spring mark and could cause muscle damage and trip hazards for horses, and also could lead to wildlife interactions.  Being prohibited from dunes was problematic as there were few areas where people could ride safely in Dunedin and they preferred to stick to established tracks.  There were more quad bikes using the dunes at Brighton and creating their own paths.  No research been done regarding the impact of horses on wildlife.  There was no correlation between research on vehicle damage and horses.  Mr McNamara supported comments regarding restriction of vehicles apart from launching boats etc.  Controls were needed over four wheel drives on beaches.  A quad bike had once caused one of his horses to rear up.

 

Geraldine Tait, Waikouaiti Coast Community Board

 

The Board had agreed that it was an excellent idea to restrict vehicles on beaches.  This would provide opportunities for passive recreation.  Ms Tait had lived in Blueskin Bay for over 30 years and considered that beaches were a place to go to take time out and not worry about traffic or whether a child was in danger.  There were a number of access places for vehicles and people could launch kayaks and small boats.  She considered that vehicle access should be for boat launch only.

 

Ms Tait was concerned about wildlife in the area and considered that birds and sea lions needed protection and could be affected by vehicle traffic.  Wildlife was owed a duty of respect by restricting vehicle access to those special beaches.  In regard to horses, people moved to the area because they liked a quiet life.  Quite a few people liked the beach for horses and she had never seen any galloping.  She thought that Warrington Beach should be accessible to horses, and that they should stick to formed tracks to access the beach.  A horse with sulky was not a motorised vehicle and could be included.  Ms Tait considered that land yachts were dangerous.

 

Derek Onley and Geraldine Tait, Warrington Reserve Group

 

The Warrington Reserve Group was an informal group of local residents that had been in existence for at least 15 years and was concerned about the quality of the environment, wildlife etc.  Making the reserve a good quality experience was also important.  The group had concerns regarding dogs being poorly controlled on the beach and vehicles on the beach.  Mr Onley considered that this was a great opportunity to ban vehicles from beaches.  In terms of birds and wildlife the important beaches were Karitane, the Otago Peninsula etc.  At end of Warrington Spit, large numbers of birds roosted, and oyster catchers and godwits were both endangered.  Vehicles blasted through bird sleeping areas.  If endangered birds were disturbed during summer roosting, they did not get to migrate.  The area would no longer be a good place for them to hatch and roost.  The group would like vehicles banned from beaches and would also like these areas to be split off as reserves.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting until Wednesday 15 March 2017.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 5.35 pm until Wednesday 15 March 2017 at 9.00 am.

 

 

Paul Pope, Otago Peninsula Community Board

 

Cr Andrew Whiley declared an interest as a member of the Otago Peninsula Community Board and withdrew from the meeting at 9.00 am, and Cr Benson-Pope took the Chair.

 

Mr Pope noted that Tomahawk and Smaills Beach were used as boat launching access areas and there was a question of how these issues would be dealt with.  There had been a number of rescues at Smaills Beach and people had launched boats there.  There was confusion about what the bylaw covered and conflicting advice regarding whether beaches such as Allans Beach were covered by it.  The bylaw, signage and education all needed to be part of the same package.  Information signage needed to be developed.  There should be the maintenance and development of areas so they were sustainable in the long term.

 

Mr Pope noted that there was nothing in the bylaw relating to cultural taonga, harvesting, preserving middens and wrecks etc for cultural purposes, also nothing on alcohol consumption.  He considered that horse riders were generally self-regulating and that horses did not work well in dune areas because of injury.  In regard to drones, it was important that the Otago Peninsula was seen as film friendly.  This was regulated by the CAA.  He considered that children should not be stopped from flying small drones.  The Board believed that the bylaw must be fair and transparent and appropriately resourced.  It was important to improve physical access points and people saw access to coastal areas as a right.

 

Cr Andrew Whiley returned to the meeting at 9.09 am and resumed the Chair.

 

Peter Gibbons, St Kilda Surf Lifesaving Club

 

Cr Conrad Stedman declared an interest due to his involvement with another surf lifesaving club and withdrew from the meeting at 9.10 am.

 

Mr Gibbons advised that he also had authority to speak on behalf of Surf Lifesaving New Zealand.

 

The Club wanted an exemption to allow vehicles on the beach.  All surf lifesaving clubs used vehicles on their own beaches.  Vehicles were also used for competitions, training of lifeguards and clubs travelled to different beaches depending on conditions on the day.  An exemption was sought for vehicles on beaches for surf lifesaving purposes.  It was also necessary for search and rescue capability to drive onto beaches.  Removal of

"cowboys" using vehicles on beaches was the club's concern.  The club used drones relatively rarely, for safety at events.

 

Cr Conrad Stedman returned to the meeting at 9.19 am.

 

Megan Brick, Brighton Pony Club and individual

 

Ms Brick considered that safety was paramount.  Children rode from Waldronville along the beach to the pony club grounds as the road was totally unsafe.  If there were changes relating to horses on beaches this would impact on numbers belonging to the club.  It was disappointing not to have had contact from Council to stakeholders such as pony clubs, trainers etc prior to release of the proposed bylaw.  She was hoping it was a misunderstood concept regarding horses on beach.

 

People on horses rode in sand dunes on allocated tracks.  This was a safe environment for children to learn and an enclosed environment.  It was hoped these tracks would not be off limits.  Ms Brick observed that sometimes the only option for training racehorses was to take them to the beach in frosty conditions or when horses were injured.  She felt that this was a good opportunity for the Council to consider dedicated bridle paths and allocated tracks for horse riding.

 

Catherine Smith, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago

 

Ms Smith advised that walking dogs, both leashed and unleashed, provided huge benefits for health through physical activity.  People with long term health conditions benefited.  She questioned whether dog walking access could afford to be further restricted.  One piece of puzzle should not be dealt with without looking at the bigger picture.  She expressed the hope that walking dogs would not be restricted on sportsfields etc.  Ms Smith commented and gave examples of the various physical and mental health benefits from dog walking and also commented on her research.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting for 15 minutes.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 9.53 am to 10.10 am.

 

 

Carol Dempster

 

Ms Dempster advised that she lived at Westwood backing onto the Kaikorai Estuary and had been a user of area for a very long time, since childhood.  More discussion was needed about horses in sand dunes.  Horses were not the only ones that would have detrimental effects on dunes.  Motorbikes also caused detrimental effects.  Horses took a cautious approach and cuttings were not the work of horses.  There were other areas where horses were not being ridden where there were troubles of a different kind eg sea damage at St Clair.  Directing horses to use areas of soft sand was unsafe for horses.  Ms Dempster was not convinced that the equestrian community was consulted with well prior to the release of the draft bylaw and suggested that better means of consulting in future were needed.  Ms Dempster noted that the appendix did not include the Ocean View to Westwood Beaches or the Island Park sand dunes area where horses were currently allowed to be ridden.  There was also nothing on the Council website about where people were allowed to ride horses.  It would be nice to see horse riders having some visibility on the website.  There was a need to think about where horses could be ridden as roads were dangerous.  Beaches offered safe riding for children.

 

Chris Valentine

 

Mr Valentine commented that the main point about horses on beaches appeared to be a misunderstanding and appeared to have been addressed.  He supported allowing horses on the beaches that were currently mentioned and also that it should be extended to other beaches.  He supported this for riding and for training as long as it was done responsibly.  He could not find evidence of injury to the public relating to horses on beaches.  Mr Valentine agreed with restricting beach access to vehicles except for such reasons as boat launching or sand collection.

 

Joseph Dougherty

 

Mr Dougherty was an ecologist involved in conservation with experience in coast reserves.  He noted that there were lots of vested interests as Dunedin was an incredibly significant place with estuaries, incredible marine diversity, and conflict between recreational activities and the environment.  If the Council tried to cater for recreational demands then it might miss out on other opportunities eg Warrington recently had lots of vehicles on the beach which damaged the ecology of the area.  Horses hooves impacted on sand and mudflats, including animals that lived in the sand.  Signage was inadequate eg those signs prohibiting dogs from areas of Brighton where birds nested and roosted.  Dogs killed sea birds and there was a need to do more about this.  Vehicles on beaches also caused problems.  Mr Dougherty noted that most damage occurred in intertidal zones and mudflats and that it was undesirable to have large numbers of horses on beaches.

 

Stuart Holt

 

Mr Holt was a resident at Warrington who had observed a lot more people with four wheel drive vehicles.  The car parking area was making the beach accessible to vehicles.  There were a lot more vehicles on the beach, including quad bikes, and these were disturbing nesting birds.  This would not be accepted elsewhere.  He had also observed a sea lion trying to get to her pup through vehicles.  During a surf lifesaving event there were lots of vehicles on the beach.  It needed to be blocked off in a way that the surf club could put its own vehicles into the water.  These things could not be policed and not all beaches could be treated as roads.  There was minimal activity from horses on Warrington Beach.

 

Sandra Sutherland

 

Ms Sutherland had been a horse rider for 44 years and rode at Ocean View and Brighton.  She had a long association with the area and noted that the road was dangerous in that area.  The track through the dunes was narrow and very little damage was done by horses.  Most was done by vehicles and problems were also caused by weeds and rubbish dumping etc.  She had looked at university research and little damage was done by horses.  Horse riders contributed to the economy.  It used to be possible to ride on the grass verges of roads but this was no longer possible.  Other safety measures for horses had also disappeared.  Horse riders were always forgotten by city planners.  Other cities had tracks etc.  There were now freedom campers at Ocean View which had halved the parking and made it difficult for horse floats.  Not all groups got on well.  In regard to conflicts between riders and quad bikes etc most people were good and pulled over if they encountered horses in the dunes.  Ms Sutherland also commented on sharing beach areas and asked where people could take recreational vehicles to enjoy them.

 

Oliver Goldsmith, Hare Hill Horse Treks

 

Mr Goldsmith commented that people got confused with what was proposed regarding horses on beaches and noted that the wording had now been altered, although that did not solve all the problems.  His business had used Aramoana Beach for 20 years now and he was happy with the way things were.  He wanted to limit the impact they made.  Conflict over the use of resources was not new.  His business limited the number of horses they had on the beach.  A person on foot was with the riders, and removed any excrement.  Some people were still not happy with that.  He had customers that came to Dunedin specifically to ride on Aramoana Beach.  Not too many places in New Zealand offered what his business was able to and he thought it was unique.

 

Mr Goldsmith noted that other users could be cavalier about removing droppings, however many horse people were self-regulating and self-regulation was best for recreational groups.  Wildlife was less threatened by horses compared to people and dogs.  When there were vehicles on the beach his horses had to vacate as he could not risk people being hurt.  If there were land yachts his horses did not go there.  The treks always gave wildlife a wide berth.

 

Sarah Hexamer

 

Ms Hexamer tabled a submission and photos.  In regard to horses and dogs she respected the importance of preserving dunes.  Horses caused little damage to dunes.  Occasionally a seal was encountered in dunes but they were not concerned by horses.  There was a need to manage dunes  and people could be more respectful.  There were not many tracks etc in forestry areas for people to take their horses.  To reduce options for riding in dunes would be quite devastating.  This was safer than riding on roads as gravel was often slippery and damaged horses. 

 

In regard to dogs, a few ruined it for everyone.  There needed to be some restrictions.  She appreciated there were dog parks but for those who lived in the country beaches were better as long as the dogs were under control.  Dogs on beaches could be a problem if they chased horses, and could be a danger to people on beaches.  She would like responsible owners of horses and dogs to be allowed to continue to use beaches..

 

Brett Bensemann, Tautuku Fishing Club Dunedin and Haast Inc

 

Mr Bensemann advised that he was also involved with other fishing organisations.  He considered there was a need to look at why beaches were closed and noted that there were a lot of regulations.  Vehicles taking boats to beaches and going fishing should be exempt.  This was also teaching people to fish and provide food.  The main focus should be on "hoons" in sand dunes etc.  On the subject of horses, sea water etc was good for horses and sea access should still be available for horses.  Also children took their horses to the beach, not just the racing fraternity.

 

In regard to fears of new technology, privacy, effects on wildlife etc related to drones, they would be a new concept in fishing.  The food chain on the Otago coast was unique.  A drone could take a line out, fish and bring the line back.  If the Council started closing down recreational areas where people could go, there would be problems.  Beaches should be kept available for people to use.  Mr Bensemann also commented on issues with freedom campers at Smaills Beach.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 12.35 pm to 1.00 pm

 

 

Dr Karsten Schneider

 

Dr Schneider was quite happy with the changed draft sent to submitters which had addressed most of his issues.  He did not understand why Shelly Beach was excluded from kite surfing.  Kite surfers had an entry point close to the mole.  He was also a jogger as well as a kite surfer and spent a lot of time on the beach at Brighton.  He had come up against dogs and did not know whether dogs would be friendly.  Dogs were often not controlled and dog excrement was left on the beach and moved around by the tide.  Dr Schneider did not support vehicles on the sand unless they were being used for launching etc and he considered that there was no real conflict between kite surfers and horses.

 

Meghan Mills

 

Ms Mills was appearing for the Brighton Pony Club as well as an individual horse rider.  She commented on access to beaches at Ocean View.  She lived about 800m from the beach access point and Scroggs Hill riders had even further to go.  It was a dangerous road for riders and she requested consideration be given to easier access.  There was historical access at the bottom of Braids Hill.  She did not have a problem with dunes being off limits to horses.  Beaches were used by locals to ride and horse trainers brought their horses.  There were also other recreational users.  Tracks through the dunes were good but there was potential for damage to horses' tendons.  There were issues with dogs not properly controlled on the beach and historical issues of dogs attacking ponies, with potential for conflict.  Ms Mills considered that there was often huge potential for conflict between horses and kite surfers.

 

Michelle O'Malley-Scott

 

Ms O'Malley-Scott considered that the bylaw needed to be renamed the Beach Reserves Bylaw.  She would like to see dunes protected, with weeds removed and natives planted.  The beach was a medicinal help for horses.  She was a horse rider and had encountered dogs.  She did not take her dogs to the beach with horses.  Other dogs were often off leads on the beach and she was not sure about control.  Her horse was not used to other dogs.  Ms O'Malley-Scott did not like the idea of drones buzzing overhead but felt that they could be used in designated flying areas.

 

She had not encountered dune buggies etc when with horses.  Sand was unpredictable though.  If a vehicle struck a soft patch and got stuck it would often lurch to get out and cause a danger to other users.  She would like beach access to be maintained for as many people as possible.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting until 1.50 pm.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 1.35 pm to 1.50 pm.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Andrew Whiley):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting until the next speaker arrives.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 2.05 pm to 3.03 pm.

 

 

Graeme Anderson, Westwood Training

 

Mr Anderson advised that beaches and horses had gone together without any problems for many years.  His beach was Westwood and he had worked horses on the beach for 12 years.  The beach users got on well and there was no trouble between horse riders, dog walkers etc.  Not many swimmers used that beach.  The bylaw appeared to be reducing the parts of the beach he could use.  He did not impact on dunes at all as he accessed the beach through the estuary area.  No other horses impacted on the dunes as sulkies were used so they did not go through the dunes.  Swimmers generally went to Brighton Beach.  In some areas horse faeces was not picked up immediately.  He did not often see drones or quad bikes using this area.  Other horse trainers used the area regularly or occasionally but these were low impact as they did not use vehicles.  Kite surfers created a disturbance for horses and were very hard to stop.  He could only work at low tide and could not work in deep sand.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting until Tuesday 21 March 2017 at 9.00 am (to deliberate).

 

Motion carried

 

 

The meeting adjourned at 3.17 pm and resumed on Tuesday 21 March 2017 at 9.10 am.

 

 

Deliberations

 

The Subcommittee noted that it had heard those submitters who wished to be heard on 14 and 15 March 2017. 

 

The Manager Civic and Legal advised that emails had been received from Terry Wilson relating to the deliberations.  She had clarified to him that today's deliberations were a continuation of the previous week's hearing and would be held in public.

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Confirms the response to Mr Wilson that the deliberations meeting would be held in public.

 

Motion carried

 

An email had also been received about the number of submissions and it was to be included in the decision how the number of submissions was calculated.

 

The matters raised by submitters were discussed by the Subcommittee and the following points made by submitters were suggested for inclusion in the amended bylaw document and/or associated report and implementation plan for recommendation to the Council:

 

·      New wording regarding the definition of beaches.

·      The permit requirement for drones to be removed given the CAA requirements already in place, with the airspace of sensitive ecological areas to be removed from the areas where drones were permitted to be flown.  It was also felt that it would be useful to have the capacity to add and subtract sensitive areas by Council resolution.

·      Safe management as a purpose of the bylaw was to be emphasised.

·      Sensitive flora and fauna to be emphasised.

·      The expansion of areas available to sensible rider use for horses.

·      The need for clear signage.

·      The inclusion of an implementation plan when the report went to Council.

·      Enforcement issues and a section on Enforcement and Penalties.

·      The need for education around the use of drones and CAA requirements.

·      The parking of vehicles on beaches following boat launching.

·      Provision to allow people to collect driftwood or seaweed for non-commercial purposes.

·      Additions to the lists of vehicles, vessels and other things used on beaches.

·      Definition of events.

·      The installation of maps and signposts at designated beach access points.

·      It was noted that horse training with motorised vehicles may require a permit.

·      The implementation plan to deal with particular user groups and also to cover permit costs (if any).

·      Removal of horse droppings.

·      Provision for the retrieval of hang gliders etc.

·      Provision for vehicles undertaking beach maintenance and for other work purposes.

·      There was discussion on appropriate speed limits eg 10 km/h when not otherwise specified.

·      The schedule of where horses are allowed was to be expanded.

·      Clarification of prohibitions in sensitive ecological areas eg salt marshes, dunes.

The Subcommittee would report to the Council meeting on 1 May 2017.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting until Wednesday 5 April 2017 at 9.00 am (for further deliberations).

 

Motion carried

 

 

The meeting adjourned at 11.36 am and resumed on Wednesday 5 April 2017 at 9.10 am.

 

 

The Subcommittee recorded that members had attended a drone demonstration the previous day provided by submitter, Mr Glen Turner.

 

The draft updated bylaw and maps had been circulated in previous days and were considered on a page-by-page basis by the Subcommittee.  The following additional points were discussed for inclusion.

 

·      Notes to be added regarding public safety.

·      Requirements regarding drones to be in line with those of other local authorities eg reference to 1.5 kg drone weight, however it was noted that technology was changing and provision could be left for change.

·      Explanatory note to be included that the Council only had jurisdiction over parts of beaches.

·      Definition of "camp" to be adjusted.

·      Whether "ecologically sensitive zones" could include a provision "from time to time as determined by resolution of Council".

·      "Fauna" definition also to include insects.

·      Expansion to the definition of "vehicles".

·      There was discussion on horses in dunes and formed and designated access points.

·      There was discussion on provision for events and training on beaches.

·      It was suggested people should take the most direct practical route when launching or retrieving vehicles.

·      Practicalities relating to enforcement and the appointment of enforcement officers.

·      A schedule of ecologically sensitive areas where vehicles, drones etc are prohibited to be added eg Okia Reserve/Victory Beach, albatross colony, Aramoana Beach, Shelly Beach and salt marsh, Boulder Beach etc.  This would be discussed with the Department of Conservation and the Yellow-eyed Penguin Trust.  An exemption would be granted for rangers and vehicles undertaking "approved conservation activities".

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Subcommittee:

 

Adjourns the meeting.

 

Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned from 10.45 am to 10.55 am.

 

The Manager Civic and Legal suggested additions to the clause relating to permission and prior approval.

 

There was discussion on seizure of vehicles for dune damage and disturbance of wildlife.  A penalty section was to be developed.

 

The schedule where horses are permitted was also to include Tomahawk, Smaills Beach, parts of Aramoana, Warrington, Blackhead to Braids Hill, south of Brighton swimming beach.

 

Maps would not be included in the bylaw document itself.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Chairperson Andrew Whiley):

That the Subcommittee:

 

a)     Notes the report and submissions on the proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017;

b)     Makes further amendments to the proposed bylaw following these deliberations and that the amended bylaw be circulated for electronic sign-off by the Subcommittee (with the Subcommittee to meet again if any issues arise);

c)     Recommends to Council the final form of the Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 for adoption, incorporating the changes made following consideration of submissions and hearings.

Motion carried (BYL/2017/003)

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 11.12 am.

 

 

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

   

 

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Minutes of Community Boards

Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board - 3 May 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items and public forum of the minutes of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board meeting held on 3 May 2017

b)     Approves the following Part B item(s) of the minutes of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board meeting held on 3 May 2017:    

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board held on 3 May 2017

43

  



 

Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board

UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board held in the Keith Willis Lounge, Coronation Hall, 97 Gordon Road, Mosgiel on Wednesday 03 May 2017, commencing at 12.00 pm

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Sarah Nitis

 

Deputy Chairperson

Joy Davis

 

Members

Phillipa Bain

Martin Dillon

 

Cr Mike Lord

Dean McAlwee

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Tom Dyer (Acting Group Manager, Parks and Recreation), Bernie Hawke (Group Manager, Arts and Culture), Catherine Irvine (Solid Waste Manager) and Linda Roxburgh (Mosgiel Librarian)

 

Governance Support Officer      Wendy Collard

 

 

 

The Board observed a minute's silence in memory of Blackie Catlow.

 

1       Public Forum

1.1    Proposal to name a new road off Riccarton Road East

 

Mr Amin Osama from Gallaway Cook Allan was not in attendance as the report was not being considered by the Board at this meeting.

  

 

2       Apologies

An apology was received Maurice Prendergast.

 

It was moved (Sarah Nitis/Cr Mike Lord):

 

That the Board:

 

        Accepts the apology from Maurice Prendergast.

 

Motion carried

 

3       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Dean McAlwee):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the agenda the following additions:

a)     Removal of Item 6 – Otago Regional Council update due the unavailability of the Otago Regional Council staff;

b)     Item 9 – Proposal to name a new road off Riccarton Road East be deferred to the next meeting.  This is due to a request from the developer to delay the report until the Board's next meeting was received to allow them to undertake additional work prior to consideration of the report.

 

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/021)

 

 

4       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

There were no declarations of interest made or conflicts of interest declared.

 

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Cr Mike Lord):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/022)

 

5       Confirmation of Minutes

5.1    Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board meeting - 15 March 2017

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/ Phillipa Bain):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the minutes of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board meeting held on
15 March 2017 as a correct record.

 

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/023)

Part A Reports

6       Otago Regional Council Update

 

The Manager Natural Hazards (Dr Jean-Luc Payan) and the Senior Policy Analyst (Sylvie Leduc) from the Otago Regional Council were unable to attend due to an unexpected commitment.  It was noted that they would be attending the Board's next meeting.

 

7       Library Activity Report

 

A report from Arts and Culture provided a summary of the activities of the Dunedin Public Libraries for the period 1 January to 31 March 2017, with a focus on the activities of the Mosgiel Library and Service Centre, with statistics covering the period from 1 July 2016 to 31 March 2017.

The Group Manager Arts and Culture (Bernie Hawke) spoke to the report and provided an update on the upcoming mobile library services review.  Mr Hawke responded to questions which included lending trends and visitation.

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Cr Mike Lord):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Library Activity Report

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/024)

 

8       Solid Waste Update

 

The Solid Waste Manager (Catherine Irvine) provided an update on the landfill and recycling in particular the initiatives that would be undertaken to reduce the number of recyclables being disposed of into the Landfill.

Ms Irvine responded to questions on the lifespan of the Green Island Landfill; the methane gas to electricity scheme being used and the contamination rate in the yellow lid wheelie bin.  She advised that there was an Education Officer who would be able to assist the Board with the running of a Recycling/Waste Minimisation Workshop in Mosgiel and Outram.

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Joy Davis):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the update

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/025)

 

9       Proposal to name a new road off Riccarton Road East.

 

The Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board agreed to defer the report to the Board's next meeting being held on Wednesday 14 June 2017.

 

10     Governance Support Officer's Report

 

A report from Governance provided an update of activities relevant to the Board's area which included:

a)     Project Fund.  It was noted that a proposal for the remainder of the project fund would be presented at the next Board meeting.

b)     Draft Long Term Plan Template.  Following discussion, it was agreed that the Board would hold a workshop on Monday 12 June 2017.

c)     Transport Update.  Following discussion, the Board agreed to support the request for a P5 within the vicinity of the public toilets.

 

Moved (Martin Dillon/Sarah Nitis):

That the Board:

 

a)      Support the request for the installation of a P5 within the vicinity of the public toilets at the intersection of Factory and Gordon Roads

 

b)     Recommend that it been installed along Factory Road should staff approve the request.

 

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/026)

 

 

d)     Action List.  There was discussion on the action list which included Mosgiel green spaces and the playgrounds at Memorial Park.

 

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Cr Mike Lord):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Governance Support Officer's Report.

b)     Amends the Action List as appropriate

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/027)

 

11     Board Updates

 

Board members provided updates on activities including:

Keep Dunedin Beautiful (KDB)

 

·           Outram Glen Toilets – Mural.  Phillipa Bain requested that staff progress the project as only limited progress had been made; and

·           Trees for Babies – Celebrating families.  Each Autumn, in partnership with Rotary Dunedin, KDB organised for tree plantings in city reserves which allowed families to celebrate the birth of a child or any significant family milestone.  This year "Trees for Babies" would be held on Sunday 14 May 2017 along the harbour cycleway.

 

Community Engagement

 

Festival of the Plain.  The Chairperson advised that Joy Davis had agreed to be nominated for the Chairperson for the Festival of the Plain Committee.

 

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Dean McAlwee):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Board Updates.

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/028)

 

12     Chairperson's Report

 

A report from the Chairperson updated the Board on matters of interest since the previous meeting which included:

·          Mosgiel-Taieri Emergency Response Planning;

·          Draft 2017/18 Annual Plan Submission

·          CCS Disability Action Group

·          Dunedin City Council Long Term Plan

 

Moved (Sarah Nitis/Joy Davis):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Chairperson's report

b)     Writes to Alastair Dickie, Bill Feather and the Mosgiel-Taieri Emergency Response Group for their efforts over the past years

c)     Updates the Community Plan to include an item on the "Accessible Journeys-Street Count Project" as a potential Social Well-Being Project.

d)     Endorses the Board's submission to the draft Dunedin City Council 2017/18 Annual Plan

e)     Confirms a Board workshop will be held to establish local priorities for the Dunedin City Council 2018/19-2028/29

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/029)

 

13     Council Activities

 

Councillor Mike Lord provided an update on following matters of interest to the Board which included:

·      Carbon Policy

·      Civil Defence Activation

·      Resource Consent Application for the proposed Hotel.

 

 

Moved (Cr Mike Lord/Phillipa Bain):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the update.

Motion carried (MTCB/2017/030)

 

14     Items for Consideration by the Chair

 

There were no notification of agenda items.

 

The meeting concluded at 2.36 pm.

 

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

   

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Otago Peninsula Community Board - 20 April 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items of the minutes of the Otago Peninsula Community Board meeting held on 20 April 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Otago Peninsula Community Board held on 20 April 2017

49

  



 

Otago Peninsula Community Board

MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Otago Peninsula Community Board held in the Portobello Bowling Club, Sherwood Street, Portobello on Thursday 20 April 2017, commencing at 10.00 am

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Paul Pope

 

Deputy Chairperson

Hoani Langsbury

 

Members

Lox Kellas

 

 

Christine Neill

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Richard Saunders (Group Manager Transport) and Tom Dyer (Acting Group Manager Parks and Recreation)

 

Governance Support Officer      Pam Jordan

 

 

1       Opening

Paul Pope opened the meeting with a reflection.

2       Public Forum

This item can now be found following item 9.

 

3       Apologies

 

Moved (Lox Kellas/Hoani Langsbury):

That the Board:

 

Accepts the apologies from Cr Andrew Whiley, Edna Stevenson and Graham McArthur.

 

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/019)

 

4       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Christine Neill/Lox Kellas):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the agenda, with the public forum to be held when the speaker arrives.

 

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/020)

 

 

5       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Paul Pope declared that he was a member of the organising committee for Wild Dunedin.

 

 

Moved (Christine Neill/Lox Kellas):

That the Board:

 

a)     Amends the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A of the report; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/021)

 

6       Confirmation of Minutes

6.1    Otago Peninsula Community Board meeting - 9 March 2017

 

Moved (Christine Neill/Lox Kellas):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the minutes of the Otago Peninsula Community Board meeting held on 9 March 2017 as a correct record.

 

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/022)

 

Part A Reports

7       Governance Support Officer's Report

 

The report informed the Otago Peninsula Community Board of activities relevant to the Board area including:

a)     Project Fund

b)     Scholarship Fund

c)     2017 Community Boards Conference

d)     Correspondence

e)     Draft Long Term Plan Template

f)     Slip Locations

g)     Action List.

 

Work on the two car slip on Highcliff Road was now complete and could be deleted from the Action List.

 

The pull-off areas had been split into two different packages.

 

Designs for the Peninsula Connection project were expected to be confirmed soon and would be brought back to the Board.  Tenders would be sought over the next couple of months with work expected to start in September/October.  A meeting had been held with NZTA and Spokes to discuss the design. The outcome of the project was to ensure that Portobello Road was improved for all road users.  The Chair also confirmed he had discussed the visibility of cyclists issue with Spokes.

 

Other slips on Highcliff Road had also happened recently and it was intended to put all remaining slips into one package for remediation.  Safety barriers would also be included in the tender.  It was intended to hold a public meeting at Pukehiki to explain what was being done.  Work would take place over winter.

 

Logging of maintenance issues was to be deleted from the Action List.

 

A meeting would be held with interested parties over winter to present options for Wellers Rock parking.

 

The Group Manager Transport updated the Board about issues that had arisen as a result of the weather the previous weekend and remediation work that was being done.

 

The Tidewater Drive culvert was working as it should.

 

There was discussion on the forthcoming review of the Freedom Camping Bylaw.  Hoani Langsbury commented on problems with freedom camping in the carpark at Pukekura.  It was suggested that the security contractors that enforced the bylaw should be random in their visits rather than adhering to a timetable.  With regard to the provision of bins for freedom campers, it was suggested that these could be located at Pukehiki and Vauxhall for people entering and exiting the Peninsula.  Parks and Recreation staff would consider the matter of waste disposal on the Peninsula during the camping season and this would be added to the Action List.  Te Rauone was also suggested as a possible location.  A request was made for consideration of compaction bins and combination recycling facilities.

 

The Chairperson had contacted the Department of Conservation regarding a toilet at Sandfly Bay and a meeting would be arranged.

 

An update was given on progress with the Reserves and Beaches Bylaw.

 

There was discussion on the playground review and a request was made for an update on playgrounds in the Board area and equipment removal for the next meeting.

 

The matter of pest management (both animals and plants) was discussed and the Chairperson advised that he had asked staff to include this in the Council's submission to the Otago Regional Council Annual Plan and he would also include it in the Board's submission.

 

Other matters drawn to the attention of staff included the state of the Portobello Domain building and entrance road, and the need for trimming of vegetation on the footpath at Broad Bay Beach.  Staff were thanked for replanting trees at Portobello Domain.

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Paul Pope/Christine Neill):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Governance Support Officer's Report.

b)     Approves the expenditure of $190.00 (including GST) on an Anzac Day wreath.

c)     Approves Lox Kellas being the Board's second representative at the national Community Boards Conference.

d)     Amends the Action List as appropriate.

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/023)

 

8       Funding Application - Hereweka Harbour Cone Trust

 

A funding application was received from the Hereweka Harbour Cone Trust for the reconstruction of the old access road to the 1870 Larnach Model Farmstead buildings.

 

Paul Pope declared an interest as a trustee of the Hereweka Harbour Cone Trust and withdrew from the meeting at 10.30 am.  Hoani Langsbury took the chair.

 

 

Moved (Hoani Langsbury/Christine Neill):

That the Board:

 

a)     Grants the funding application from the Hereweka Harbour Cone Trust for $1,000.00 towards the reconstruction of the old access road to the 1870 Larnach Model Farmstead buildings.

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/024)

 

Paul Pope returned to the meeting at 10.39 am and resumed the chair.

 

9       Funding Application - Otago Harbour Ferry Inc

 

A funding application was received from Otago Harbour Ferry Inc for an inclining test for the "Elsie Evans".

 

It was noted that there appeared to be two projects: an inclining test and anti-fouling.  It was suggested that the group needed to provide more details.

 

 

Moved (Lox Kellas/Hoani Langsbury):

That the Board:

 

a)     Defers the funding application from Otago Harbour Ferry Inc for an inclining test for the "Elsie Evans" until the new financial year and further clarification be sought on the purpose of the application.

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/025)

 

7       Public Forum

2.1    Board Scholarship Recipient - Georgia Pope

 

Georgia Pope, Board Scholarship recipient, addressed the meeting concerning her Otago Girls' High School World Challenge expedition to Thailand and Cambodia for a month over the previous Christmas holidays.  She outlined the skills she had learned as part of the project relating to travel, budgeting and interacting with other people.  She also described the activities the group had undertaken, including a trek, community service at a school, and visiting tourist attractions.  Georgia reported that she had participated in everything and gained new friendships and skills from the experience.  She thanked the Board for its support.

 

10     Working Parties/Board Area Liaison Updates

 

a)     Keep Dunedin Beautiful

 

There was no update in Graham McArthur's absence.

 

 

 

b)     Rural Roads Update

 

Matters had been discussed as part of the Governance Support Officer's Report.

 

 

 

c)      Area Updates

 

Board members advised of the good turnout at the recent Te Rauone meeting and the forthcoming meeting with engineers, and the community engagement meeting held at Pukehiki regarding the Annual Plan.  There was discussion on appropriate signage for pull-over areas and the Group Manager Transport advised that these would be in accordance with national standards and early warning signs would also be installed.  Recycling issues at Pukehiki were on-going, with people from outside the area continuing to dump rubbish at the site, and possible solutions were being discussed with staff.

 

11     Community Plan

 

A new template had been circulated as part of the Governance Support Officer's Report for updating.  The Chairperson asked members to send him issues for inclusion and he would put together a draft for consideration at the next meeting on 25 May 2017. 

An emergency response plan for the Board would also be discussed at this meeting.

 

12     Chairperson's Report

 

A report from the Chairperson updated the Board on matters dealt with since the last meeting and other matters to be considered.  These included:

a)  Rubbish bins for camper van rubbish at Taiaroa Head and other areas of the Peninsula

b)  Public Toilets at Taiaroa Head and Sandfly Bay

c)  Community Plan

d)  Highcliff Road Upgrades and Repairs

e)  Fly tipping monitoring on the Peninsula

f)  Closure of the Marine Lab Wharf to the Public

g)  Heritage Festival

h)  Meeting with the Digital Trust 19 May 2017

i)   Board Member Clinics Dates

j)   Biodiversity Forum

k)  Tourist Operators Forum

l)   Civil Defence Emergency Response Plan

m) Otago Regional Council Annual Plan Submission

Some of the topics had already been covered elsewhere in the agenda.

The Chairperson advised that he would write to the University to find out about access to the Marine Laboratory wharf.

He asked Board members to choose dates for the Board clinics in the areas for which they had responsibility and noted that the Macandrew Bay clinic would be held that evening in conjunction with the Annual Plan community engagement meeting.

It was agreed that the proposed Biodiversity Forum would be held in September.  The meeting with tourist operators would be held on 24 May.

The meeting with Spokes would now be held at the 6 July meeting.

 

Moved (Chairperson Paul Pope/Hoani Langsbury):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the report from the Chairperson for April 2017.

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/026)

 

13     Council Activities

 

Councillor Andrew Whiley had provided an update via email which covered the following topics:

 

·      Reserves and Beaches Bylaw

·      Public Art Framework

·      Numbers of building consents issued

·      Dunedin tourism marketing

·      Dunedin Destination Plan consultation

·      Annual Plan community engagement.

 

Moved (Chairperson Paul Pope/Lox Kellas):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Council Activities report for April 2017.

Motion carried (OPCB/2017/027)

 

 

The matter of a comment reported as being made at a resource consent hearing for an Otago Peninsula property regarding the impact of urbanisation on wildlife was raised.  The Group Manager Transport advised that he would discuss this with the Group Manager Community and Planning.

 

14     Items for Consideration by the Chair

 

There were no items notified.

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 11.47 am.

 

 

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

   

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Saddle Hill Community Board - 4 May 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items and public forum of the minutes of the Saddle Hill Community Board meeting held on 4 May 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Saddle Hill Community Board held on 4 May 2017

56

  


min

 

Saddle Hill Community Board

MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed Minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Saddle Hill Community Board held in the Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin on Thursday 04 May 2017, commencing at 3.30 pm

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Scott Weatherall

 

Deputy Chairperson

Leanne Stenhouse

 

Members

Peter Gouverneur

Christina McBratney

 

Keith McFadyen

Paul Weir

 

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Adrian Blair (Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services); Richard Saunders (Group Manager Transport); Josh Von Pein (Transport Delivery Manager), Gareth Jones (Sports Services and Programming Officer) and Roy Johnson (Senior Safety Engineer, NZTA)

 

Governance Support Officer      Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

1       Public Forum

There was no Public Forum.  

2       Apologies

There were no apologies.

3       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Scott Weatherall/ Keith McFadyen):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration

 

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/024)

 

4       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 


 

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Scott Weatherall/Leanne Stenhouse):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/025)

 

5       Confirmation of Minutes

5.1    Saddle Hill Community Board meeting - 16 March 2017

 

Moved (Chairperson Scott Weatherall/Christina McBratney):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Saddle Hill Community Board meeting held on 16 March 2017 as a correct record.

 

 Motion carried (SHCB/2017/026)

Part A Reports

6       New Zealand Transport Agency Update

 

Roy Johnson (Senior Safety Engineer) from NZTA commented on items of interest for the Board including:

Abbotsford off ramp/Westland Street intersection – Mr Johnson advised that NZTA had assessed the three intersections which caused congestion at the southern exit/entry to the motorway at Abbotsford and the Brighton/Main South Road intersection.  He confirmed that potentially three roundabouts would be installed at both exits/entries to the motorway and the Brighton Road intersection.  Mr Johnson commented that the first step would be to obtain design and costing concepts which should allow the build to commence in the 2017/18 financial year.

The Chair expressed gratitude on behalf of the Board and residents noting the frustrations with the current layout.

There was a discussion on maintenance issues with the grass and vegetation areas at the side of the motorway on/off ramp.  The Chair requested an onsite meeting with NZTA and DCC staff to determine the responsibility for the sites and confirm a way forward.

Saddle Hill underbridge – The Chair advised that the area under the Saddle Hill underbridge was also poorly maintained and it was agreed this would be included in the site visit.

 

Moved (Chairperson Scott Weatherall/Keith McFadyen):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the report.

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/027)

7       Governance Support Officer's Report

 

This report informed the Saddle Hill Community Board of activities relevant to the Board's area including:

a)     Project Fund – it was noted that there was $3,818.16 remaining in the project fund with one meeting before the end of the financial year.

b)     Draft Long Term Plan Template

c)     Action List

 

Richard Saunders (Group Manager Transport) and Josh Von Pein (Transport Delivery Manager) were present to respond to questions on the Transport items in the action list.

 

The Chair congratulated Mr Saunders on his new position as Group Manager Transport and commented that the Board looked forward to continue working with him.

 

Messrs Saunders and Von Pein provided the following update to items on the Action List:

 

Morris Road, Fairfield – The reconstruction of the section of road that had slipped was almost complete.  The installation of side rails and other minor works required should be completed by the end of May.  Mr Saunders expressed his thanks to the Coach Road residents for their patience during the remedial works.

 

Brighton/Taieri Mouth Road Erosion – A report had been completed and would be discussed with the Chair at a site visit the following week.

 

Brighton Road, Ocean View to Creamery Road laybys – The contractor was requested to include the grading/maintenance of the laybys in their works contract.

 

Scroggs Hill Road – Allanton-Scroggs Hill Road Intersection – Mr Saunders advised that the intersection had been redesigned to include the elevation of the land.  He commented that the angle that drivers approached the corner contributed to the crashes and the elevation at the side should help address that.

 

Westwood Layby Consultation – Mr Von Pein provided an update on the discussions held with private landowners.

 

Blackhead Road Walking Path – Mr Saunders advised that it was a safety necessity that a walking path be constructed on Blackhead Road especially with the possible construction of the Cargills Castle Track.  The safety team would continue to investigate and progress options for the construction of the path.

 

McIntosh Road – Brighton Road Intersection – The visibility issues raised with vegetation on private land had been raised with the assets department.  They would investigate further and report back to the Board.

 

Brighton Bridge and Taylor St road markings– The issues with the redundant words and markings being visible had now been rectified by the contractor.

 

Morris Road and Taieri Mouth Road waterways/ditches – Mr Saunders advised that the work to have the vegetation and rubbish removed from the waterways and ditches had been programmed with the contractors and he expected a higher level of service in the future.  

 

Otokia - Kuri Bush Road – Mr Saunders advised that discussions would be held with contractors on Monday 8 May at which time the level of service of rural roads would be discussed.  He noted some of the issues to be discussed were sites which had a less than desirable level of service and required more gravel.

 

Brighton Road, Ocean View accessway – The safety team would work with residents over the installation of a no entry sign at the driveway which serviced 906-920 Brighton Road.

 

Road Reserve, Ocean View – Property owners from 886 and 890 Brighton Road had queried the ownership of the road reserve and responsibility for the vegetation maintenance.  Mr Saunders advised that the land was the responsibility of the owners. 

 

Waldronville subdivision – Mr Saunders advised that the concerns raised over the traffic layout at the new intersection at Waldronville were with the safety team.  He commented that the team was in the process of assessing and recommending changes to speed limits for the city and this area of Brighton Road would be included in the review.

 

The Chair commented on concerns raised at recently held Community Engagement Meetings including:

 

Flower St - Main Road intersection safety concerns were raised following both the serious and fatal accidents that had occurred at the intersection.  The Board enquired if there had been any reports on the safety of the intersection and requested the findings be reported back.

 

Driver Feedback Signs – Mr Saunders advised that Council had purchased additional driver feedback signs which could be installed at sites identified by the Board if required. 

 

Cycleways – The Board requested an update on the status of cycleways more specifically the Southern Scenic Route and the Mosgiel – Fairfield route via Morris Road.  Mr Saunders advised that the Southern Scenic Route would be included in the Long Term Plan as part of the consultation on cycleways ten year programme. 

 

The Board advised that they would like to see Morris Road included within the next year and would like to work with Council on the Southern Scenic Route with a view to completion within three years.  Mr Saunders advised that there was no budget for the Morris Road cycleway to be undertaken in the next year and spoke of consideration needed to ensure connectivity should the proposed Chain Hill tunnel project proceed.

 

Ice Indicators – The Board requested that ice indicators be installed on Brighton Road near Allen Road.  Mr Von Pein advised that there had been problems with the ice indicators not working properly and until the issue had been rectified, staff were reluctant to have additional ones installed. 

 

Tuapeka Print site, Fairfield –The Tuapeka Print site had expanded with the result that many staff parked on the road.  The Board queried remedies available as they noted it caused visibility issues for residents leaving the subdivision next to the site. 

 

Main Road, Fairfield Vegetation – The Board commented that the vegetation in the garden plots on the Main Road near Fairfield School had grown which caused issues due to the height and size of the plants.  This caused challenges for both pedestrians and motorists and the Board requested that staff assess the plots.

 

Vegetation – It was noted that vegetation blocked the speed sign in Westwood and the view over the Brighton Bridge was also blocked by vegetation.  The vegetation growth would be assessed and a red speed sign would be painted on the road in Westwood.

 

Richard Saunders (Group Manager Transport) and Gareth Jones (Sports Services and Programming Officer) provided an update on the Parks, Recreation and Aquatics items on the agenda.

 

Road Reserve, Ocean View – Further to the update provided by Transport on the vegetation on the road reserve outside 886 and 890 Brighton Road, Ocean View, Mr Jones advised that Parks and Reserves would remove the willow tree and residents would then be responsible for the removal of the other vegetation.

 

Brighton Domain planting update- Mr Jones advised that staff were waiting for pricing on the planting. 

 

Fairplay Street Toilet Facilities – the Board noted that they had been requesting toilet facilities at Fairplay Street playground for many years and had been told it was part of the city wide project however they had not received any updates.  They requested an update on the bigger project of toilet facilities for Dunedin and in particular, the Fairplay Street. 

 

Fairfield Tavern Reserve – Mr Jones advised that there was a report due to the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee meeting in the next few months which would provide an update on the Fairfield Tavern Reserve.  There was a discussion on the submission to the 9 February 2017 meeting by two members of the public on planting at the reserve which would be forwarded to Mr Jones for consideration. 

 

The Chair noted that the submitters referred to above wanted to undertake and care for more planting in the reserve and questioned whether the Board would be able to financially support the project.  Mr Jones commented that the main consideration would be to ensure that the species picked was a good fit with the reserve and whether the funding could occur out of existing budgets.

 

Sports Fields Playing Surfaces – Mr Jones advised that the sports field conditions were favourable and staff were working with sports user groups to ensure the premier grounds remained in top condition for the season.

 

Sunnyvale Sports Grounds – the Board commented on the need to capture feedback received from local residents, citing an elderly resident in the Sunnyvale area who had extensive knowledge of the grounds and felt that the contractor was not proceeding with appropriate measures.  Mr Jones advised that turf consultants were being engaged to profile all reserves in the city including Sunnyvale.

 

Walton Park Showers – Mr Jones advised that contractors were engaged to open all toilet/shower blocks at sports fields with bookings and should this not happen, the public needed to phone the Dunedin City Council who would ensure they would be opened.

 

Green Park Cemetery – The Board thanked staff for the removal of gorse at the Green Park Cemetery in time for the ANZAC day service.

 

The Chair commented on concerns raised at recently held Community Engagement Meetings including:

 

Kaikorai Estuary – there were requests received for the extension of the car park facilities as this was a popular entrance to the beach and the formalisation of some of the walking tracks through the sand dunes.  The Board requested an aerial photograph to identify the main tracks and suggested working with the Pistol Club to see if they had any car parking available. 

 

There was a discussion on methods to convey the information to the public and Mr Jones advised that an information board would be the most efficient method.

 

Waldronville Pumping Station Land – Residents had queried whether the land at the site of the Waldronville Pumping Station could be used for a recreational activity such as a bike track.  There are current issues with the land being boggy and flooding which causes flooding on Friendship Drive.  Mr Jones advised that the dumping of vegetation by contractors contributed to the problem and they would be informed of the areas to keep clear.

 

Planting fruit trees in reserves around our communities – Mr Jones advised that there had been similar requests around the city.  He commented on considerations required such as the long term ownership of the land and the leasing to a community group to enable them to take control and the longevity of the project.  If the group was well established then they would be encouraged to lodge an application through the parks team.  Mr Jones spoke of the problems that occur when a project is short lived and Council then needs to provide maintenance of the trees and land at a cost to the ratepayer which is not encouraged.

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Scott Weatherall/Leanne Stenhouse):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Governance Support Officer's Report.

b)     Amends the Action List as appropriate

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/028)

 

8       Board Updates

 

Board members provided updates on activities including:

Keep Dunedin Beautiful – There was a discussion on the creation of a mural at the Fairplay Street Reserve.  Mr Gouverneur advised that he would discuss this at the next Keep Dunedin Beautiful meeting and seek their support for the project.

Greater Green Island – Ms Stenhouse advised that Greater Green Island had submitted twice to the Dunedin City Council Annual Plan, one for a playground for Green Island and the other for place based community groups.  She commented that there would be a function held on 24 May 2017 for local businesses to raise funds for the playground for services or funding.

Ms Stenhouse commented on other funding projects and events Greater Green Island would hold including a funding night at Queens Birthday and pop up events in Green Island to raise funds for the continuation of Greater Green Island and raise their profile. 

Youth Ambassador Award – Ms McBratney advised that Erin Ford, the recipient of the Youth Ambassador Award had been to the Melbourne Science Camp and was due to attend a further science camp in London.  She planned to undertake school visits and speak to the pupils in term 3 or 4 of the current year.  It was agreed that the Board would contact the school and arrange the visits on behalf of Ms Ford.

Saddle Hill Community Board Flyer – There was a discussion on the printing and distribution of the Saddle Hill Community Board flyer.  Mr Gouverneur advised on costings and it was agreed that the Board would update information to ensure the flyer was relevant and then have 3,000 copies printed.

 

Moved (Keith McFadyen/Peter Gouverneur):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the updates

b)     Approves the purchase of 3,000 Saddle Hill Community Board Flyers up to a cost of $1,000.00.

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/029)

 

9       Chairperson's Report

 

A report from the Chairperson (Scott Weatherall) provided an update on issues raised with the Chair and matters not covered by other reports on the agenda.

Cycleways – The Chair spoke of the safety issues with the increase in camper vans on the roads and commented that there was a preference the situation be resolved before an accident happens.

Civil Defence – The Chair advised that Council had made a commitment to act early in the recent possible flooding event on 12 April 2017 by activating Civil Defence.  The Board requested that the Emergency Management Officer Training and Readiness be asked about the availability of civil defence booklets detailing what to do in an emergency as they would like to make these available to the local community.

Resource Consents – It was noted that Mr McFadyen was the only qualified Board member to sit on Resource Consents.  The Board would like other members to undertake training and called for expressions of interest.  Mr Weir and Ms Stenhouse both advised they were interested and the Board requested this be passed on to Council for consideration.

Community Meetings – It was noted that there had been an increase in illegal poo dumping especially at the Kaikorai Estuary car park area and the Board requested this information be forwarded to animal services.

Community sign – there was a discussion on the creation and installation of a community sign for each of the suburbs in the Board area.  Members were asked to consider the project for discussion at the next meeting.

Fairfield School – The Chair advised that year 6 pupils would like to work on community led projects and asked for suggestions. 

 

Moved (Chairperson Scott Weatherall/Cr Conrad Stedman):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Chairperson’s Report.

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/030)

 

10     Council Activities

 

Councillor Conrad Stedman provided an update on matters of interest to the Board including:

·           Reserves and Beaches Bylaws

·           Heritage Awards – Cr Stedman advised that he was a judge for the Heritage Awards and thoroughly enjoyed being part of this worthwhile project.  He spoke of the awards evening and the recipients.

 ·          Trustpower Community Awards – Cr Stedman spoke of the community based projects, applicants and recipients of the Trustpower Community Awards.

·           Civil Defence Activation – Cr Stedman was involved in the civil defence activation on 12 April 2017 and spoke of the positive contrast to the flooding in 2015.  He praised all involved in the bunker and community.

·                           Council meeting

 

 

 

 

 

Moved (Cr Conrad Stedman/Keith McFadyen):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the update.

Motion carried (SHCB/2017/031)

 

11     Items for Consideration by the Chair

 

There were no items notified for consideration.

 

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 5.15 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Strath Taieri Community Board - 20 April 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items of the minutes of the Strath Taieri Community Board meeting held on 20 April 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Strath Taieri Community Board held on 20 April 2017

66

  



 

Strath Taieri Community Board

MINUTES

 

Minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Strath Taieri Community Board held in the Strath Taieri Community Centre, Middlemarch on Thursday 20 April 2017, commencing at 2.00 pm

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Barry Williams

 

Members

Bevan Dowling

Norma Emerson

 

David Frew

Cr Christine Garey

 

Jacinta Stevenson

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Tom Dyer (Group Manager Parks and Recreation), Andrew Lord (Contract Supervisor Road Maintenance)

 

Governance Support Officer      Jennifer Lapham

 

 

1       Public Forum

There was no Public Forum.  

2       Apologies

An apology was received from Joan Wilson.

 

Moved (Barry Williams/Bevan Dowling):

 

That the Board

 

Accepts the apology from Joan Wilson.

 

Motion carried

 

3       Confirmation of agenda

 

The Chairperson advised that the Emergency Management Officer (Training and Readiness) was unable to attend the meeting due to the Activation debrief being held at this time.

 

 

 

Moved (Barry Williams/Bevan Dowling):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the agenda noting that item 6, Civil Defence, had been withdrawn.

 

Motion carried (STCB/2017/011)

 

4       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Barry Williams declared an interest in the Project Fund applications from Strath Taieri Historical Society, The Taieri Pipe Band and The Strath Taieri Medical Services Committee.

 

Norma Emerson declared an interest in the Project Fund applications from the Strath Taieri Historical Society and The Strath Taieri Lions Club

 

David (Jock) Frew declared an interest in the Project Fund applications from the Strath Taieri Lions Club.

 

 

Moved (Bevan Dowling/Jacinta Stevenson):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/012)

 

5       Confirmation of Minutes

5.1    Strath Taieri Community Board meeting - 9 March 2017

 

Moved (Norma Emerson/David Frew):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Strath Taieri Community Board meeting held on 9 March 2017 as a correct record.

 

 Motion carried (STCB/2017/013)

Part A Reports

6       Civil Defence

 

This item was withdrawn due to the unavailability of Emergency Management Officer (Glenn Mitchell).

 

 

7       Project Fund Applications

 

Consideration was given to funding applications from the Strath Taieri Historical Society, East of the rock and Pillar group, the Taieri Pipe Band, Strath Taieri Lions, Middlemarch Community Library and the Strath Taieri Medical Services Committee.

 

The Chairperson withdrew from the Chair as he had declared an interest in some of the applications.  Councillor Garey chaired this part of the meeting.

 

Discussion took place on the applications.  Members commented on the quotes received in the applications for the Middlemarch Community Library and the Strath Taieri Medical Services Committee with some believing that more than one quote should have been supplied.

 

 

Moved (Christine Garey/Bevan Dowling):

 

Barry Williams and Norma Emerson withdrew from this item.

That the Board:

 

a)     Grants funding of $3,000.00 to the Strath Taieri Historical Society towards the Platypus Submarine Conservation – Part One.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/014)

 

 

Moved (Christine Garey/Norma Emerson):

That the Board:

a)     Grants funding of $1,200.00 to the East of the Rock and Pillar Group towards a new local history project.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/015)

 

 

Moved (Bevan Dowling/David Frew):

 

Barry Williams withdrew from this item.

That the Board:

a)     Grants funding of $430.00 to the Taieri Pipe Band toward transportation costs on Anzac Day.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/016)

 

 

Moved (Bevan Dowling/Barry Williams):

 

Norma Emerson and David Frew withdrew from this item.

That the Board:

a)     Grants funding of $2000.00 the Strath Taieri Lions towards the purchase of a marque.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/017)

 

 

Moved (Christine Garey/Bevan Dowling):

That the Board:

a)     Declines the funding application from the Middlemarch Community Library.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/018)

 

 

 

Moved (Christine Garey/David Frew):

 

Barry Williams withdrew from this item.

That the Board:

a)     Grants funding of $2797.00 to the Strath Taieri Medical Services Committee towards the repainting of the fence subject to a second quote being received

Motion carried (STCB/2017/019)

 

A discussion took place on how the information from the second quote would be assessed.         

 

 

Moved (Bevan Dowling/David Frew):

That the Board:

a)     Delegates to Cr Garey and Jacinta Stevenson the authority to liaise with the Strath Taieri Medical Services Committee regarding the requirement for a second quote and determine if the funding should be allocated.

 

Motion carried (STCB/2017/020)

 

8       Governance Support Officer's Report

 

        The report provided an update on matters of interest including:

a)     Project Fund

b)     Community Plan

c)     Correspondence

c)     Action List

 

 

·      Community Plan – it was agreed that this would be added to the agenda for the next meeting, and members were requested to provide ideas for inclusion in Section 4 and 5.  Suggestions included the upgrading of the Community Hall Roof, and a bridge over the rail trail.  The Chairperson advised he would put a note in the Taieri Pet to seek any comments or suggestions.

·      Correspondence – discussion took place on the correspondence from Richard Muir and the Cycle Surgery in response to an article in the Taieri Pet from the Chairperson commenting on the behaviour of cyclists. 

Members commented that the main concern was not the cyclists using the Rail Trail but road cyclists particularly between Mosgiel and Outram.   It was agreed that the Chairperson would contact the Chairperson of the Mosgiel Taieri Community Board to with a view to contacting NZTA to make the road safer for all users.

·      Action List – discussion took place on the Action List.  Gordon Marr (Contract Specialist Facilities Management) joined the meeting to provide an update on the heating in the hall which was being signed off.

The meeting adjourned between 3.20 pm and 3.27 pm to allow members to view the new heaters in the hall.

Members requested that netting be placed on the road fence at the playground to stop balls rolling out on to the road.

 

Moved (Bevan Dowling/Jacinta Stevenson):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Governance Support Officer's report

b)     Amends the action list as appropriate

c)     Delegates to the Chairperson to contact the Chairperson of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board regarding safety issues on the Mosgiel to Outram road with a view to contacting NZTA to seek a solution.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/021)

 

9       Chairperson's Report

 

The Chairperson provided an update on the weed control programme and noted other items had been considered earlier in the meeting.

 

 

 

Moved (Bevan Dowling/Jacinta Stevenson):

That the Board:

 

a)     Notes the Chairperson's report.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/022)

 

10     Council Activities

 

Councillor Garey provided an update on the Dunedin Destination plan and the Dunedin Hospital SOS campaign.

 

 

Moved (Norma Emerson/David Frew):

That the Board:

a)     Notes the report.

Motion carried (STCB/2017/023)

 

 

 

11     Notification of Agenda Items for Consideration by the Chair

 

Norma Emerson advised that she would provide information relating to the Wifi Hot Spots projects and as she was not able to attend the next meeting she would ask Noel Matthews if he was available to speak in the public forum.

 

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 3.52 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

..............................................

C H A I R P E R S O N

   

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 19 April 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A items and the public forum items of the minutes of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting held on 19 April 2017

b)     Approves the following Part B item(s) of the minutes of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting held on 19 April 2017: 

Item 13:   Notification of Agenda Items for Consideration by the Chair  

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Waikouaiti Coast Community Board held on 19 April 2017

72

  



 

Waikouaiti Coast Community Board

MINUTES

 

Minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board held in the Karitane Hall, Coast Road, Karitane on Wednesday 19 April 2017, commencing at 5.30pm

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Alasdair Morrison

 

Deputy Chairperson

Geraldine Tait

 

Members

Mark Brown

Mandy Mayhem-Bullock

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Richard Russell

 

Rose Stringer-Wright

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Bernie Hawke, Group Manager Arts and Culture, Andrew Lord, Contract Supervisor Road Maintenance.

 

Governance Support Officer      Arlene Goss

 

 

 

1       Public Forum

1.1    Public Forum

 

Ben Owen addressed the community board regarding a walkway off Apes Road. He requested that a pathway be built to assist walkers with safety concerns. He would like to see cyclists using the path as well. This is 1.5km long walkway. It may need to cross over the road in places. Mr Owen was asked if there was community support for his request. He was willing to seek support from the community.

The chairman offered to raise this request with transport staff.

 

1.2    Public Forum

 

Shirley McKewen addressed the community board regarding an application for funding for work on pathways at Hawkesbury Lagoon, and the potential use of an area of DCC Recreation Reserve near the Waikouaiti Race Course on Inverary Street for a BMX track or skate park.

The grant application will be fully considered at the May meeting.

Discussion was held on the suitability of the Inverary Street site for a skate park. Need to check site history for hazardous waste. Proximity of railway line is a hazard. The chairman offered to have a look at the suggested location and come back to Ms McKewen. She was asked to find out whether the children of the area wanted this facility.

1.3    Public Forum

 

Ewart Campbell, Secretary/Treasurer of the Waikouaiti RSA spoke regarding an application on the agenda for a grant to assist with painting the RSA building. It was last painted in the 1970s and the building is used three days a week by the community.  

  1.4  Resolution to Extend Public Forum

 

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Alasdair Morrison/Member Mandy Mayhem-Bullock):

That the Board:

Agrees that the time given to the public forum is extended past half an hour.

1.5    PUBLIC FORUM CONTINUED

 

 

Neil Kennedy spoke on the planting of former forestry land at Waikouaiti. He is concerned about the lack of public consultation on the type of trees to plant.

 

The chairman said Council are putting drones in the air to take photos of the area and create plans. Once these are done there will be public meetings.

 

Member Mark Brown said the community board have been assured that no further planting will happen without consultation with the community.

 

Mr Kennedy also raised a problem with rabbits in the area and the chairman agreed this needs to be addressed.

 

2       Apologies

There were no apologies.

 

3       Confirmation of agenda

 

The chairman invited Andrew Lord from Council's Transportation department to talk to the board about a recent flood event. Moved Alastair, seconded Rose

 

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Alasdair Morrison/Member Rose Stringer-Wright):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the agenda with the addition of a verbal report from Contract Supervisor, Road Maintenance, Andrew Lord, on recent flooding.

 

Motion carried (WC/2017/013)

 

 

Andrew Lord spoke about the impact of recent heavy rain on the road network. He asked for feedback from the board members. The chairman raised Shortcut Road - repairs are being prioritised. Manse Road - resident concerned about grading. Council only maintains to the fork in the road. Will be checked out.

Mr Lord also updated community board members on other projects including yellow lines. Traffic count results at Waitati do not look alarming. The chairman asked for results of a current traffic count taking place at Warrington, when available.

Mr Lord was thanked for attending.

4       Declarations of Interest

 

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4       Confirmation of Minutes

5.1    Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting - 8 March 2017

 

Moved (Member Mark Brown/Cr Jim O'Malley):

That the Board:

 

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting held on 8 March 2017 as a correct record.

 

 Motion carried (WC/2017/014)

     Part A Reports

6       Library Activity Report

 

        This report provided a summary of the activities of the Dunedin Public Libraries for the period 1 January to 31 March 2017, with a focus on the activities of the Waikouaiti and Blueskin Bay Libraries and Service Centre, with statistics covering the period from 1 July 2016 to 31 March 2017. Bernie Hawke, Group Manager Arts and Culture, answered questions on this report.

7       Funding Applications

 

        The Waikouaiti Coast Community Board received three applications for funding to be considered from the project fund. 

        The Waikouaiti RSA Inc applied for $3,000.00 towards the cost of repainting the exterior of the RSA building situated at 10 Pratt Street, Waikouaiti.

        Discussion included the timing of the application and whether it would be better to wait until next Spring when the painting project would take place. Also whether the RSA had looked into other funding sources. Member Geraldine Tait said she would be happy to help applicants source other funding. Bernie Hawke also offered the use of a funding database.

        It was resolved that the community board leave the grant application from the Waikouaiti RSA on the table, and provide advice to the RSA on other funding sources, and also ask the RSA to come back to the community board later in the year when the painting project is due to start.

        The Waikouaiti/Palmerston Toy Library applied for $1,000.00 for assistance with rent and power at their premises for 2017.

        Cr Jim O'Malley sat back from the table during the consideration of this item because he has written a reference letter for the Toy Library. He did not vote.

 

        The chairman was unsure if council policy allowed the community board to give grants for operating costs. The members also asked questions regarding the operation of the Toy Library that needed to be answered.

        It was resolved that this remain on the table to seek further advice on council policy and also seek further information from the Toy Library.

        Cr O'Malley returned to the table.

        The Progress of Waikouaiti Area organisation applied for $630.00 for a teardrop flag to be used at the POWA office and events. Discussion was held on whether a flag would be a good investment to benefit the community. The community board resolved to decline the application.

 

Moved (Member Richard Russell/Member Mandy Mayhem-Bullock):

That the Board:

 

 

Agrees to let the grant application from the Waikouaiti RSA lie on the table, and will provide advice to the RSA on other funding sources, and will also ask the RSA to come back to the community board later in the year when the painting project is due to start.

 

 Motion carried (WC/2017/015)

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Alasdair Morrison/Member Richard Russell):

That the Board:

 

Agrees to let the grant application from the Waikouaiti/Palmerston Toy Library lie on the table to seek further advice on council policy and also seek further information from the Toy Library

 

Motion carried (WC/2017/016)

 

 

Moved (Deputy Chairperson Geraldine Tait/Member Richard Russell):

That the Board:

 

Declines the grant application from the Progress of Waikouaiti Area organisation applied for $630.00 for a teardrop flag.

 

Motion carried (WC/2017/017)

 

8       Proposed Community Communications and Engagement Plan 2017

 

Member Geraldine Tait circulated a communications plan drawn up by the community board at an earlier time and suggested upgrading this plan. Discussion was held on different communication channels including a facebook page.

 

It was agreed that a workshop was needed to discuss communication and also the drafting of the new community plan. This could be held at the Blueskin Library meeting room with policy people in attendance.

 

 

Moved (Deputy Chairperson Geraldine Tait/Member Richard Russell):

That the Board:

 

Holds a workshop to discuss the Community Plan and a communications strategy.

 

 Motion carried (WC/2017/018)

 

9       Governance Support Officer's Report

 

 

The board discussion included the following items:

 

1.  It was agreed to pay the Blueskin News for the publication of two recent chairman's columns.

2.  The first meeting of the Waikouaiti Transfer Station group will be on May 22, with the time to be decided.

3.  It was agreed to add the following items to the Action List:

·      Chairman to alert Nick McGuire of the rabbit problem at Waikouaiti Beach.

·      Chairman to follow up on 2015 email recommending no traffic on Karitane Wharf. Site meeting to be organised by member Richard Russell.

4.  The Warrington Domain has re-opened after flooding. Council will be looking at the Freedom Camping bylaw on May 29. The chairman has requested to speak at the public forum of that meeting. An email on freedom camping from resident Dee O'Halloran was circulated to members.

5.  The community board would like to request a workshop on the Civil Defence Emergency Plan. Dates were discussed and May 31 suited most people.

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Alasdair Morrison/Deputy Chairperson Geraldine Tait):

That the Board:

 

        Approves the payment of $160 from the board's projects budget to the Blueskin News, for the publication of the chairman's column.

Motion carried (WC/2017/019)

 

10     Reports from Members

 

Deputy chair Geraldine Tait reported back from the community board chair and deputy chairs meeting in Gore.

Mandy Mayhem-Bullock updated the board on the activities of Keep Dunedin Beautiful.

 

 

11     Chairperson's Report

 

The chairman gave a verbal update on the following matters:

 

·      Workshop in Palmerston with the Safe Roads Alliance.

·      Attendance at Blueskin on Show. 

·      Removal of trees from Waitati Cemetary.

·      RMA training for community board members. GSO to seek information on opportunities for members.

 

 

 

There was a discussion on the speed limit on state highway one on the Waitati corner. Cr O'Malley offered to take concerns to the regional transport meeting.

 

The community board expressed frustration at the lack of progress on new toilets at Waitati. It was agreed that the chairman and Cr O'Malley would meet with the council chief executive to express their concerns regarding this matter.

 

 

Moved (Chairperson Alasdair Morrison/Member Richard Russell):

That the Board:

 

Accepts the chairman's report.

 

Motion carried (WC/2017/020)

12     Council Activities

 

Cr O'Malley updated the board on council activities including the Long Term Plan process and the Freedom Camping bylaw review.

 

 

Part B Reports

13     Notification of Agenda Items for Consideration by the Chair

 

The community board would like a report back on the land being considered for a skate park (discussed earlier in this meeting). Member Many Mayhem Bullock agreed to work on updating the communications plan and bringing it back to the next meeting.

 

 

The meeting concluded at 8.39pm.

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

   

 

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

Reports

 

Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report recommends Council adopts the Proposed Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 ("Bylaw") as recommended by the Bylaw Subcommittee.

2      Staff recommend accepting amendments to the Bylaw recommended by the Bylaw Subcommittee following public consultation and a hearings process.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Accepts the Bylaw Subcommittee's recommended decisions on the submission topics presented through public submissions.

b)     Resolves to adopt the Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 with the amendments, as shown in the attachment to the staff report.

c)     Resolves for the Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 to commence on a date to be advertised by staff following the approval of the Bylaw by the Minister of Conservation.

 

BACKGROUND

3      At its 5 April 2017 meeting, the Bylaw Subcommittee resolved to recommend to Council to adopt the Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017 with amendments, as detailed below.

DISCUSSION

4      The draft Bylaw, as presented at the 12 December 2016 meeting, has now been updated to include amendments recommended by the Subcommittee in response to public submissions.

5      Attached is the "Bylaw Hearing Subcommittee Recommendations" report. It details the hearing process and the sub-committee's recommendations from this.

6      The "Implementation Plan" attachment details how the recommended changes will be actioned.

OPTIONS

 

Option One – Recommended Option

 

7      This is the option recommended by the Bylaw Subcommittee.

Option Two – Status Quo

8      Although status quo is an option, it is recommended by the Bylaw Subcommittee to amend the Bylaw as outlined in this report to meet best practice and ensure internal consistency.

Option 3- No Action

9      No action will result in the revocation of the bylaw.

NEXT STEPS

10    If the Bylaw is adopted it is proposed it commences after Council contemplation.

11    A proposed implementation plan is attached.

12    Once the bylaw has been approved, it will be forwarded to the Minister of Conservation for approval.

13   

 

Signatories

Author:

Ashley Reid - Parks and Recreation Planner

Authoriser:

Jendi Paterson - Recreation Planning and Facilities Manager

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Bylaw Hearings Recommendations

82

b

Implementation Plan

89

c

Beach Access Points for Horses and Boats

90

d

Ecologically Sensitve Beach and Reserve Areas

103

e

Reserves and Beaches Bylaw 2017

110

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities. This decision also relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Reserves Bylaw contributes to the 'healthy and safe people' strategic direction of the Social Wellbeing Strategy and helps achieve parks and recreation objectives as an enforcement tool against unacceptable use or behaviour on reserves areas.

Māori Impact Statement

Reserves and beaches are important to Tangata Whenua and staff have, and will continue, to work with them through the Bylaw review to incorporate their aspirations for the management of these areas.

Sustainability

The review's intention is to enhance the economic, social and environmental integrity of Dunedin.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications as the costs can be met through existing budgets.

Significance

The matter is considered low significance in terms of Council's Significance and Engagement Policy, but it is mandatory to use the special consultative procedure in this case.

Engagement – external

There has been engagement with key stakeholders as well as formal public consultation.

Engagement - internal

Regulatory, policy and infrastructure departments have been involved to date and will continue to work collaboratively as the review and consultation concludes.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

The proposed bylaw was reviewed by external legal counsel.

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest have been identified

Community Boards

All Community Boards have an interest in the management of reserves in their areas and have had an opportunity to contribute their feedback during the consultation period.

 

 


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Council

30 May 2017

 

 

 

Review of Camping Control Bylaw 2015

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to recommend a Special Consultative Process to amend the Camping Control Bylaw 2015 (the bylaw), specifically Schedule C to allow for further sites to be considered for non certified self-contained vehicles.

2      The bylaw currently identifies two areas non certified self-contained vehicles are permitted, Warrington Domain and Ocean View Recreation Reserve. 

3      The bylaw currently:

a)     Prohibits freedom camping at sites identified in Schedule A

b)     allows self-contained vehicles, with some restrictions, at sites identified in Schedule B

c)     allows all types of freedom camping, with some restrictions, at sites identified in Schedule C.

4      There are two main proposals contained in the proposed amended bylaw that public feedback will be sought on:

(a)    Three additional unrestricted sites in Schedule C.

(b)    Strict enforcement of the existing bylaw at Warrington (see Attachment B) and the addition of bollards and hard stand to contain vehicles in the section designated for non certified self-contained vehicles.

5      The proposed amended bylaw will be supported by an increased focus on recommending camping grounds and enforcement.

6      The measures proposed are in response to the volume of non certified self-contained vehicles visiting Dunedin, with the associated issues of crowding and collateral effects on communities at Ocean View and Warrington.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft Camping Control Bylaw 2015 and Statement of Proposal for the purposes of consultation under Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002.

b)     Notes that staff will report the outcome of the public consultation and final draft Bylaw for adoption by Council in 2017 prior to the 2017/18 camping season.

 

BACKGROUND

7      Following public consultation, the bylaw was adopted by Council in September 2015 with an operative date of 1 November 2015.

8      The bylaw consolidated the previous Camping Control Bylaw 2013 and Responsible Camping Policy into a single document. The most significant change was that the new bylaw allowed for enforcement of freedom camping in prohibited areas throughout the city.

9      Unrestricted freedom camping sites were reduced from three sites to two; and three prohibited zones were introduced on the Otago Peninsula. 

10    The Freedom Camping Act 2011 and the bylaw allow freedom camping to occur all year round, however the camping season is considered to be from the start of the September through to the end of April.

11    During the 2016 off season infrastructure upgrades were completed at both unrestricted sites.

12    Improvements at Ocean View included:

·           Carpark resurfacing

·           Improving signage

·           Providing additional rubbish bins.

13    Improvements at Warrington Domain included:

·           Refurbishing the existing toilet block

·           Installing four portaloos in the Southern Area

·           Installing new ‘Big Belly’ self-compacting 600L rubbish bins

·           Re-grassing the Northern section

·           Installing an additional sign at the playground car park.

·                   

14    Prior to the 2016/17 freedom camping season a fixed term (6 month) contract was awarded for the enforcement of the bylaw on Council’s behalf. This included daily 3 hour patrols alternating across four selected routes, between the hours of 4:00-7.30am. In response to continuing demand, the contract was extended by a month till the end April.

15    Throughout the freedom camping season Council staff conducted an education campaign that focused on using social media, specific freedom camping applications, the DCC website and Council's Responsible Camping Brochure to reach prospective campers. The messaging focused on directing all campers to camping grounds or paid accommodation prior to considering the options available at Warrington or Ocean View.

16    From 1 December 2016 and 30 April 2017 the enforcement team also visited Warrington Domain between 6-9pm to speak with campers and provide education on departure times, the maximum two night stay requirement and camper responsibility. The team also responded to complaints and some noise issues during the peak season.

17    Throughout the freedom camping season contractors completed daily loose litter collection during peak periods.

18    The Waikouaiti Coast Community Board and Saddle Hill Community Boards have had significant engagement with campers, the community and staff throughout the season.

DISCUSSION

Reasons for Proposed Amendment to the Bylaw

19    The 2016/17 season saw a reduction in complaints from the previous year.

Infringement Type

Number of Tickets Issued 2015/16

Number of Tickets Issued 2016/17

Non-self-contained Vehicles Parked in Restricted Areas

296

87

Vehicles Parked Outside of the Designated Area at Ocean View

140

135

Vehicles Camping in Prohibited Areas on Otago Peninsula

77

23

Vehicles Camping for More Than Two Consecutive Nights

2

0

Total

515

245

 

20    The majority of issues reported via local communities and through the Community Boards were at Warrington and Ocean View, as follows.

Warrington:

·           High numbers of vehicles

·           Excess rubbish

·           Muddy ground caused by heavy rain and vehicles

·           Excess noise at times during peak periods

·           Less space for locals to use the domain for camping or recreation

·           Increased incidences of rogue defecating in the sand dunes

Ocean View:

·           Excess rubbish

·           Decreased area to park cars and horse floats for locals, especially on busy summer days

·           Excess noise

·           Increased incidences of rogue defecating in the sand dunes

·           Increased incidences of illegal camping on the grassed area between the car park and dunes system

·           Freedom campers not obeying the 8.30am departure time as stated clearly on signage

21    During February and March 2017 there was an increase of 37% of vehicles at Warrington compared with the previous season. Waitangi weekend peaked with 157 vehicles recorded, and six further days recorded over 100 vehicles.

Freedom Camping Survey

22    Work is underway at a national level through the Responsible Camping Forum to understand the trends and movements of visitors in both certified and non certified self-contained vehicles. The debate on the benefit these visitors bring to local economies is on-going.

23    Over a two week period in February a survey in partnership with Enterprise Dunedin was undertaken. Warrington and Ocean View campers were asked a set of questions regarding our facilities, travelling movements, demographics and economic data.  361 vehicles were surveyed, 262 from Warrington and 99 from Ocean View.

24    At Warrington 48% of visitors were aged 18-24 and at Ocean View 45%. At both sites 75% of visitors were travelling in non certified self-contained vehicles. Dunedin as a location was viewed as a stopover by 47% and a destination 53%.  Spending between $0-$50 was estimated by 67%, spend of $50-100 24% and over $100 a day 9%.

25    Other questions the survey covered included activities completed during stay in Dunedin, number or people travelling in vehicles, previous location and country of origin. A full summary of responses has been attached (Attachment A).

Amendment to Schedule C of the Bylaw

26    Council's Camping Control Bylaw has been in operation 18 months, and is regarded at a national level as a best practice bylaw by the National Responsible Camping Forum. Proactive communication, education and consistent enforcement have contributed to the reduction in complaints outlined in paragraph 17.

27    The predominant freedom camping issue that the city continues to experience is overcrowding at the two unrestricted sites; although this is more acute at Warrington Domain. 

28    Staff have identified two options to assist in resolving these issues for the community:

i.   Review the Camping Control Bylaw 2015, focusing on Schedule C and consult with the community on proposed new sites;

ii.   Enforce the existing bylaw strictly at Warrington (see Attachment B), including the addition of bollards and hard stand to contain vehicles in the section designated for non certified self-contained vehicles, continue to recommend camping grounds, and increase the focus on enforcement.

Proposed new sites

29    Staff have worked over the past 12 months on assessing the demands of space for non certified self-contained vehicles and potential sites which may assist with demands on Warrington, suggestions have been received by both the SHCB and the WCCB for future sites. Attachment C lists 15 sites that have been analysed by staff.

30    The possibility of using inner city car parks has been discussed over past months. Whilst this has been trialled and worked in some cities throughout the country, staff would recommend against using inner city car parks. It is likely there would be a period of congestion as commuters arrive in the morning and overnight vehicles are scheduled to leave.

31    Inner city freedom camping provision is considered to increase competition with local accommodation providers by providing premium locations for free in the city.

32    Staff contacted local camping grounds in the city boundary following the completion of the 2016/17 season. The purpose was to ascertain any concerns or comments on Council's approach to managing freedom camping in the city.

33    A consistent theme in the feedback was concern at the potential of any further non certified self-contained sites being opened, especially closer to the Central Business District. This was viewed as direct competition with current camping ground operations.

34    Three potential unrestricted sites have been identified for consultation (Attachment D):

a)     Rotary Park - On the edge Shiel Hill, the Rotary Park site is paved and will require toilet and rubbish facilities;

b)     Puddle Alley – Small reserve opposite the current Invermay site in Mosgiel. It is a rest area beside the Silver Stream, and will provide an option for freedom campers on the Taieri plains. This area has recently had car park surface upgrade and some vegetation clearance;

c)     Brighton Surf Life Saving Club - The area adjacent to the toilets and showers at the Brighton Surf Club has been suggested as a possible area where freedom campers could stay.

Costs of New Sites

35    The Freedom Camping Act 2011 (section 5(3)) does not enable local authorities to charge or take a donation to assist with the provision of infrastructure for freedom camping. 

36    Additional infrastructure including toilets, rubbish facilities, surfacing and signage for new sites would cost approximately $70,000-$100,000 per site.

37    Central government announced in May 2017 a further $60.5m fund on top of the $12m announced in 2015 for small communities to build toilets, signs and van parks to provide for freedom campers and other visitors.

38    The criteria for obtaining funding are tight and an independent panel including tourism industry representation allocates the money. Applicants must be "financially constrained" and will have to show value for money, be prepared to contribute financially, and prove other funding was not possible.

39    Following community consultation if further sites were recommended to be added to Schedule C, staff would apply for central government funding to assist with new infrastructure costs. This funding cannot be applied for until a project is approved and ready for construction. 

OPTIONS

Option One – Recommended Option- Consult on Amending the Camping Control Bylaw 2015

 

40    This option would see formal community consultation on opening up three additional unrestricted sites across the city.


 

Advantages

·           Council can consult on potential changes to the  bylaw which will provide clarity for both the community and campers

·           Dunedin continues to welcome all visitors to the city and creates appropriate infrastructure requirements to meet specific visitors needs

·           Supports the ability to alleviate the pressure on Warrington and Ocean View.

Disadvantages

·           Potential additional costs to ratepayers

·           Potential for perceived competition with accommodation providers across the city

·           Additional enforcement programme could be viewed as less welcoming for campers in Dunedin.

Option Two – Status Quo- Do Not Consult on Amending the Camping Control Bylaw 2015

41    This option would see no further unrestricted sites opened across the city but would direct staff to restrict and enforce areas of Warrington Domain as per the current bylaw.

Advantages

·           No additional costs to ratepayers of new sites

·           No perceived competition with accommodation providers across the city

·           No review or Special Consultative Procedure required to be undertaken

Disadvantages

·           No mitigation measures put in place to alleviate the pressure on Warrington and Ocean View.

·           Additional enforcement programme could be viewed as less welcoming for campers in Dunedin.

·           There will be costs associated with the implementation of increased enforcement.

NEXT STEPS

42    If the recommended option is adopted, staff will proceed with the Special Consultative Procedure.

43    The draft Statement of Proposal (Attachment E) and Amended Camping Control Bylaw 2015 (Attachment F) will be consulted on in accordance with Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002.

44    Staff will complete the public consultation, including hearings if required, and report back to Council prior to the start of the 2017/18 camping season with a recommendation for consideration.

 

Signatories

Author:

Ashley Reid - Parks and Recreation Planner

Authoriser:

Jendi Paterson - Recreation Planning and Facilities Manager

Tom Dyer - Acting Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Survey Results

128

b

Warrington Map

129

c

Sites Identified by Community Board and Staff

130

d

Potential New Sites

138

e

Draft Camping Control Bylaw amendments

141

f

Statement of Proposal

168

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a regulatory function and it is considered good-quality and cost effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The bylaw is consistent with a number of strategies as it balances the economic benefits of camping and the need to provide for this activity, with controls in place to manage the potential effects of Freedom Camping on the environment and communities.

 

Māori Impact Statement

The Otākou Runaka has an interest in the Pukekura Reserves at Taiaroa Head which remains a prohibited site for any freedom camping activity under the bylaw.

Sustainability

Freedom campers and visitors to the city provide economic benefits which need to be balanced with potential effects on the environment and our communities.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Not applicable

Financial considerations

Costs incurred for one off implementation requirements of the bylaw where covered from existing operating budgets. As per the report annual enforcement costs are proving to be self-funding, however increased infrastructure requirements will need to be considered against existing spending priorities through the Long Term Plan

Significance

This decision is considered to have low significance with regard Councils Significance and Engagement Policy

Engagement – external

Communication and engagement with community groups, interested organisations, local businesses and Community Boards remains a key initiative to the success of the bylaw's implementation.

Engagement - internal

Consultation with the Transport Department, i-Site and Enterprise Dunedin will continue to be on-going into the future.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Central government funding to assist with infrastructure may not be received.

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Communication and liaising with the Otago Peninsula, Waikouaiti and Saddle Hill Community Board's has been regular throughout the 2016/1017 season.

 

Waikouaiti and Saddle Hill Community Boards have suggested sites for consideration.

 

Early engagement occurred with Mosgiel Taieri Community Board regarding the Puddle Alley Site. Formal feedback will be sought through the proposed consultation process.

 

 


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30 May 2017

 

 

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30 May 2017

 

 

 

Part Town Belt - Accessway, Queens Drive to Ross Street - proposed Easement

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report discusses an application by Delta on behalf of Aurora Energy Ltd for the grant of an easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt and recommends the easement be granted. 

2      The easement is to replace historic overhead lines with underground cabling.  In addition, the existing power poles will be removed and replaced with street light columns.

The report asks the Council to make two decisions.  First, a decision in its capacity as the administering body for the reserve and second, a decision to exercise the Minister of Conservation’s delegation.RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Grants, as administering body of the Reserve pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977, an easement in gross to Aurora Energy Limited for the installation of underground cables and ancillary equipment over that part of the pedestrian accessway through the Dunedin Town Belt from Queens Drive to Ross Street, being approximately 360m2 (subject to survey) and part of Computer Freehold Register OT19C/15.

b)     Decides the criteria for exemption for public notification have been met.

c)     Acting under its delegation from the Minister of Conservation dated 12 June 2013 and pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977, an easement in gross to Aurora Energy Limited for the installation of underground cables and ancillary equipment over that part of the pedestrian accessway through the Dunedin Town Belt from Queens Drive to Ross Street, being approximately 360m2 (subject to survey) and part of Computer Freehold Register OT19C/15.

 

BACKGROUND

4      Aurora Energy Limited (“Aurora”) is currently in the process of upgrading its street lighting circuits in the vicinity of Ross Street and Queens Drive within Dunedin’s Town Belt.

The Proposal

5      It is proposed to remove the existing 1950’s overhead line that runs along the pedestrian accessway between Queens Drive and Ross Street and to place a new low voltage street lighting circuit cable underground.

6      The location and route of the new cable is shown in the technical diagram and aerial photograph as attached as Attachment A.  The cable will run for approximately 120 metres within a minimum 32mm PVC duct along the reserve.  The easement corridor width required is three metres creating a total easement area of 360m2.

7      The Council own the existing lights along the pedestrian accessway.  The power poles will be replaced by street light columns that will be owned and managed by the Dunedin City Council.  This will improve safety for the public when using the walkway and will also allow greater access to the existing vegetation for maintenance along the path.  As the cable will be buried this will not detract from the purpose and use of the recreation reserve within the Town Belt.  It will improve safety and assist in the beautification of the reserve.

8      The selection of street light columns and bulbs will be discussed by Transport and City Development staff to ensure the new lights are sympathetic to the values of the town belt. In the vicinity of the observatory it is anticipated that new LED lights will be installed to minimise light spill in the area.

9      Alternative options have been considered and discounted as undergrounding the existing overhead street lighting cable will address existing safety concerns associated with vegetation and a further overhead option in this location is not desirable. Delta will work with Parks staff to ensure that work to underground the cables and remove existing infrastructure does not have a detrimental effect on existing vegetation.

10    The ownership of the new street light columns will vest in Council upon completion of the work.

DISCUSSION

Land Status

11    The land is a recreation reserve contained within Computer Freehold Register OT19C/115 and classified for the purposes of recreation as set out in Gazette Notice 7501518.2 (NZ Gazette 2/8/2007 p2270) under the Reserves Act 1977.

Council as the administering body

12    The Council, in its capacity as administering body of the reserve, has the responsibility for ensuring compliance in terms of the Reserves Act 1977 and for considering the merits of the proposal to grant easements.

13    Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 (“Section 48”) is the statutory authority for the grant of easements for public purposes.  That authority is not affected by the Dunedin Town Belt Roads Closing and Regulation Act 1902.

The Reserves Act 1977

14    Section 48(2) requires public notification of the intention to grant an easement unless it can be demonstrated that:

(a)    The reserve is vested in an administering body and is not likely to be materially altered or permanently damaged; and

(b)    The rights of the public in respect of the reserve are not likely to be permanently affected by the establishment and lawful exercise of the easement.

15    As the cabling will be underground the rights of the public over the walkway will not be permanently affected.  It is recognised that future repairs or maintenance may be necessary from time to time.  The effects on the reserve of such repairs or maintenance will be temporary and minimal.  Accordingly the requirement for public notification is not applicable.

Relevant Reserve Management Plans

16    The Reserves Management Plan – General Policies document (“General Policies”) covers all basic issues of the day-to-day administration of reserves in Dunedin.  The Dunedin Town Belt Management Plan (“Town Belt plan”) does not replicate those policies.  The Town Belt plan takes precedence where both the General Policies and the Town Belt plan address the same issue.  Otherwise both documents are used to guide management of the reserves.

17    Although the General Policies specify that easements should be for a limited term, in this instance Council Officers recommend that the easement be granted in perpetuity as its primary purpose is public benefit.

Dunedin Town Management Plan (January 2007)

18    Section 3.6 of the Town Belt plan covers public vehicle and pedestrian routes.  Policy 4 of that section generally advises that Council will ensure streetlights meet road safety needs while not affecting the values of the reserve and that vegetation affecting lighting associated with pedestrian access routes will be trimmed.  Policy 5 further advises that Council will ensure that the maintenance of pedestrian routes through reserves will not adversely affect the reserve.

19    The easement proposal enhances the use of the access route by removing the power poles that contain the lighting and replacing these with appropriate modern street light columns.  The maintenance of vegetation along the accessway will be easier without the poles and overhead power lines.

Merits of the proposed easement

20    The proposal will enhance the use of the reserve.  The underground option addresses existing safety concerns that will improve and assist in beautification and ease of management for maintenance and access over this part of the Reserve.

Easement terms and conditions

21    The proposed key elements of the easement includes:

Statute                         Granted pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977

Grantee                       Aurora Energy Limited

Legal Description      360m2 (subject to survey) being part of part Town Belt of Dunedin part Computer Freehold Register OT19C/15

Purpose                       The right to convey electricity over and through the soil

Term                            In perpetuity

Rental                          Nil

The terms and conditions of the easement are to be finalised by the City Solicitors.

Council as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate

22    The Council, in its capacity as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate, has the supervisory role in ensuring that the decision on whether or not to grant the easement has been arrived at in compliance with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

23    In particular, the Council as the Minister’s delegate, needs to be satisfied that:

·           the status of the land has been correctly identified;

·           there is statutory power to grant the easement;

·           the necessary statutory processes have been followed;

·           the easement has been appropriately considered; and

·           the decision is a reasonable one.

24    The Town Belt is classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.  This is recorded on the Computer Freehold Register for the reserve.  Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 provides the statutory authority to grant an easement over this reserve.  The statutory processes have been followed with full consideration given on whether public notification is required.

25    The functions and purposes of the recreation classification of the reserve will be enhanced by legalising the proposed easement.  The removal of power poles and installation of modern lighting columns will improve pedestrian access through the reserve.  The management of vegetation through the area can be controlled with greater ease and efficiency.  The decision is a reasonable one taking into account the facts outlined in this report.

OPTIONS (council as administering body and acting under delegation from the minister of conservation)

Option One – Recommended Option

 

26    Consent to the grant of an electricity easement in favour of Aurora Energy Limited, on the terms and conditions outlined in this report.

Advantages

·           The proposal improves the pedestrian access through that part of the Reserve.

·           New cabling and lighting will be installed.

·           Updates infrastructure that will need replacing in the foreseeable future.

·           Less cost to Council for the maintenance of the new lights.

·           Confirms that the Council has fully considered the merits of the proposed easement and has complied with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977

Disadvantages

·           Temporary disruption while underground cabling work is undertaken.

Option Two – Status Quo

27    Do not consent to the grant of an electricity easement in favour of Aurora Energy Limited, on the terms and conditions outlined in this report.

Advantages

·           Avoids the temporary disruption while underground cabling work is undertaken.

Disadvantages

·           There is no improvement to the pedestrian access through that part of the Reserve.

·           Old 1950s cabling and power poles will remain.

·           Likely additional future cost to Council for the maintenance of old lights.

·           To take this option, the Council would need to decide that the Reserves Act 1977 has not been complied with and/or the decision to grant the easement is not a reasonable one.

NEXT STEPS

28    If the Council consent to grant the easement and is satisfied the legislative requirements are met, the Agreement to Grant the Electricity Easement can be executed and work can proceed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Maria Sleeman - Leasing Officer

Authoriser:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

The location of and diagram of the underground cable easement; and an aerial photograph showing the pedestrian accessway from Queens Drive to Ross Street

181

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The easement will result in improved pedestrian access through the Reserve which contributes to both the Social Wellbeing and Parks and Recreation Strategy.

 

Māori Impact Statement

No known impacts for Tangata Whenua.

Sustainability

The easement will provide for new and improved infrastructure that will be sustainable for the future.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications for the LTP or the Annual Plan.  There are no implications for current levels of service or performance measures.  The proposal is consistent with the Infrastructure Strategy.

Financial considerations

No financial implications.

Significance

This decision is of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significant and Engagement Policy.  It is noted that the Dunedin Town Belt is a significant strategic asset.

Engagement – external

Engagement has been undertaken with the Amenities Society who have interests in the Dunedin Town Belt in terms of its heritage value.  On-going liaison has occurred with Delta who are acting on behalf of Aurora Energy Ltd.

Engagement - internal

Parks and Recreation and Transport staff have been consulted during the proposal.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no material risks associated with the decision.  The detailed terms and conditions of the easement document will be checked by the Council’s legal team.  Any health and safety issues with regards to the proposed work will be dealt with by Aurora Energy Ltd.

Conflict of Interest

No conflict of interest identified.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards as the land is not within a Community Board area.

 


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Part Town Belt - Queens Drive to Wallace Street proposed Easement

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report discusses an application by Delta on behalf of Aurora Energy Ltd for the grant of an easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt and recommends the easement be granted. 

2      The easement is to replace historic overhead lines with underground cabling.  In addition, the existing power poles will be removed and replaced with street light columns.

3      This report asks the Council to make two decisions.  First, a decision in its capacity as the administering body for the reserve and second, a decision to exercise the Minister of Conservation’s delegation

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Grants, as administering body of the Reserve, pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977, an easement in gross to Aurora Energy Limited for the installation of underground cables and ancillary equipment over that part of the pedestrian accessway through the Dunedin Town Belt from Queens Drive to Wallace Street, being approximately 360m2 (subject to survey) and part Section 2 Survey Office Plan 469357 part Computer Freehold Register 702732.

b)     Decides the criteria for exemption for public notification has been met.

c)     Acting under its delegation from the Minister of Conservation dated 12 June 2013 and pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977, an easement in gross to Aurora Energy Limited for the installation of underground cables and ancillary equipment over that part of the pedestrian accessway through the Dunedin Town Belt from Queens Drive to Wallace Street, being approximately 360m2 (subject to survey) and part Section 2 Survey Office Plan 469357 part Computer Freehold Register 702732.

 

BACKGROUND

4      Aurora Energy Limited (“Aurora”) is currently in the process of upgrading its street lighting circuits in the vicinity of Wallace Street and Queens Drive within Dunedin’s Town Belt.

The Proposal

5      It is proposed to remove the existing 1965’s overhead line that runs along the pedestrian accessway between Queens Drive and Wallace Street and to place a new low voltage street lighting circuit cable underground.

6      The location and route of the new cable is shown in the technical diagram and aerial photograph as attached as Attachment A.  The cable will run for approximately 120 metres within a minimum 32mm PVC duct along the reserve.  The easement corridor width required is three metres creating a total easement area of 360m2.

7      The Council own the existing lights along the pedestrian accessway.  The power poles will be replaced by street light columns that will be owned and managed by the Dunedin City Council.  This will improve safety for the public when using the walkway and will also allow greater access to the existing vegetation for maintenance along the path.  As the cable will be buried this will not detract from the purpose and use of the recreation reserve within the Town Belt.  It will improve safety and assist in the beautification of the reserve.

8      The selection of street light columns and bulbs will be discussed by Transport and City Development staff to ensure the new lights are sympathetic to the values of the town belt.

9      Alternative options have been considered and discounted as undergrounding the existing overhead street lighting cable will address existing safety concerns associated with vegetation and a further overhead option in this location is not desirable. Delta will work with Parks staff to ensure that work to underground the cables and remove existing infrastructure does not have a detrimental effect on existing vegetation.

10    The ownership of the new street light columns will vest in Council upon completion of the work.

DISCUSSION

Land Status

11    The land is a recreation reserve contained within Computer Freehold Register 702732 and classified for the purposes of recreation as set out in Gazette Notice 7501518.1 (NZ Gazette 2/8/2007 p2270) under the Reserves Act 1977.

Council as the administering body

12    The Council, in its capacity as administering body of the reserve, has the responsibility for ensuring compliance in terms of the Reserves Act 1977 and for considering the merits of the proposal to grant easements.

13    Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 (“Section 48”) is the statutory authority for the grant of easements for public purposes.  That authority is not affected by the Dunedin Town Belt Roads Closing and Regulation Act 1902.

The Reserves Act 1977

14    Section 48(2) requires public notification of the intention to grant an easement unless it can be demonstrated that:

(a)    The reserve is vested in an administering body and is not likely to be materially altered or permanently damaged; and

(b)    The rights of the public in respect of the reserve are not likely to be permanently affected by the establishment and lawful exercise of the easement.

15    As the cabling will be underground the rights of the public over the walkway will not be permanently affected.  It is recognised that future repairs or maintenance may be necessary from time to time.  The effects on the reserve of such repairs or maintenance will be temporary and minimal.  Accordingly the requirement for public notification is not applicable.

Relevant Reserve Management Plans

16    The Reserves Management Plan – General Policies document (“General Policies”) covers all basic issues of the day-to-day administration of reserves in Dunedin.  The Dunedin Town Belt Management Plan (“Town Belt plan”) does not replicate those policies.  The Town Belt plan takes precedence where both the General Policies and the Town Belt plan address the same issue.  Otherwise both documents are used to guide management of the reserves.

17    Although the General Policies specify that easements should be for a limited term, in this instance Council Officers recommend that the easement be granted in perpetuity as its primary purpose is public benefit.

Dunedin Town Management Plan (January 2007)

18    Section 3.6 of the Town Belt plan covers public vehicle and pedestrian routes.  Policy 4 of that section generally advises that Council will ensure streetlights meet road safety needs while not affecting the values of the reserve and that vegetation affecting lighting associated with pedestrian access routes will be trimmed.  Policy 5 further advises that Council will ensure that the maintenance of pedestrian routes through reserves will not adversely affect the reserve.

19    The easement proposal enhances the use of the access route by removing the power poles that contain the lighting and replacing these with appropriate modern street light columns.  The maintenance of vegetation along the accessway will be easier without the poles and overhead power lines.

Merits of the proposed easement

20    The proposal will enhance the use of the reserve.  The underground option addresses existing safety concerns that will improve and assist in beautification and ease of management for maintenance and access over this part of the Reserve.

Easement terms and conditions

21    The proposed key elements of the easement includes:

Statute                         Granted pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977

Grantee                       Aurora Energy Limited

Legal Description      360m2 (subject to survey) being part of part Town Belt of Dunedin part Section 2 Survey Office Plan 469357 part Computer Freehold Register 702732

Purpose                       The right to convey electricity over and through the soil

Term                            In perpetuity

Rental                          Nil

The terms and conditions of the easement are to be finalised by the City Solicitors.

Council as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate

22    The Council, in its capacity as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate, has the supervisory role in ensuring that the decision on whether or not to grant the easement has been arrived at in compliance with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

23    In particular, the Council as the Minister’s delegate, needs to be satisfied that:

·           the status of the land has been correctly identified;

·           there is statutory power to grant the easement;

·           the necessary statutory processes have been followed;

·           the easement has been appropriately considered; and

·           the decision is a reasonable one.

24    The Town Belt is classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.  This is recorded on the Computer Freehold Register for the reserve.  Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 provides the statutory authority to grant an easement over this reserve.  The statutory processes have been followed with full consideration given on whether public notification is required.

25    The functions and purposes of the recreation classification of the reserve will be enhanced by legalising the proposed easement.  The removal of power poles and installation of modern lighting columns will improve pedestrian access through the reserve.  The management of vegetation through the area can be controlled with greater ease and efficiency.  The decision is a reasonable one taking into account the facts outlined in this report.

OPTIONS (council as administering body and acting under delegation from the minister of conservation)

Option One – Recommended Option

 

26    Consent to the grant of an electricity easement in favour of Aurora Energy Limited, on the terms and conditions outlined in this report.

Advantages

·           The proposal improves the pedestrian access through that part of the Reserve.

·           New cabling and lighting will be installed.

·           Updates infrastructure that will need replacing in the foreseeable future.

·           Less cost to Council for the maintenance of the new lights.

·           Confirms that the Council has fully considered the merits of the proposed easement and has complied with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

Disadvantages

·           Temporary disruption while underground cabling work undertaken.

Option Two – Status Quo

27    Do not consent to the grant of an electricity easement in favour of Aurora Energy Limited, on the terms and conditions outlined in this report.

Advantages

·           Avoids the temporary disruption while underground cabling work undertaken.

Disadvantages

·           There is no improvement to the pedestrian access through that part of the Reserve.

·           Old 1965 cabling and power poles will remain.

·           Likely additional future cost to Council for the maintenance of old lights.

·           To take this option, the Council would need to decide that the Reserves Act 1977 has not been complied with and/or the decision to grant the easement is not a reasonable one.

NEXT STEPS

28    If the Council consent to grant the easement and is satisfied the legislative requirements are met, the Agreement to Grant the Electricity Easement can be executed and work can proceed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Maria Sleeman - Leasing Officer

Authoriser:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

The location of and diagram of the underground cable easement; and an aerial photograph showing the pedestrian accessway from Queens Drive to Wallace Street

190

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The easement will result in improved pedestrian access through the Reserve which contributes to both the Social Wellbeing and Parks and Recreation Strategy.

Māori Impact Statement

No known impacts for Tangata Whenua.

Sustainability

The easement will provide for new and improved infrastructure that will be sustainable for the future

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications for the LTP or the Annual Plan.  There are no implications for current levels of service or performance measures.  The proposal is consistent with the Infrastructure Strategy.

Financial considerations

No financial implications.

Significance

This decision is of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significant and Engagement Policy.  It is noted that the Dunedin Town Belt is a significant strategic asset.

Engagement – external

Engagement has been undertaken with the Amenities Society who have interests in the Dunedin Town Belt in terms of its heritage value.  On-going liaison has occurred with  Delta who are acting on behalf of Aurora Energy Ltd.

Engagement - internal

Parks and Recreation, Transport staff have been consulted on the proposal.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no material risks associated with the decision.  The detailed terms and conditions of the easement document will be checked by the Council’s legal team.  Any health and safety issues with regards to the proposed work will be dealt with by Aurora Energy Ltd.

Conflict of Interest

No conflict of interest identified.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards as the land is not within a Community Board area.

 

 


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30 May 2017

 

 

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Long Term Plan 2018: Update and First Round of Supporting Documents

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides the Council with an update on the development of the Long Term Plan 2018 (LTP).

2      This report also seeks approval of the first round of supporting documents for the purposes of developing the LTP, including: the community outcomes; city profile; and strategic significant forecasting assumptions.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts, for the purposes of developing the Long Term Plan 2018 and consulting with the community:

i)      the draft community outcome statements and headline indicators at Attachment A;

ii)     the draft Dunedin city profile at Attachment B;

iii)    the draft strategic significant forecasting assumptions as a supporting document at Attachment C; and

iv)    the DCC Growth Projections May 2017 report as a supporting document at Attachment D.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requires all local authorities to develop a LTP. The purpose of a LTP is to: describe the Council’s activities; describe the community outcomes of Dunedin; provide integrated decision-making and co-ordination of resources; provide a long-term focus for the decisions and activities of the Council; and provide a basis for accountability of the local authority to the community (Section 93 of the LGA).

4      Schedule 10 of the LGA specifies the minimum information and content that must be included in the LTP:

·           Community outcomes that describe the strategic directions;

·           Groups of activities (describing levels of service, CAPEX, and funding impact statement);

·           Council controlled organisations;

·           Financial strategy;

·           Infrastructure strategy;

·           Policies including the Revenue and financing policy and Significance and engagement policy;

·           Forecast financial statements, including financial statements from previous year;

·           Significant forecasting assumptions; and

·           Other statements (e.g. variation between territorial authority’s long-term plan and assessment of water and sanitary services and waste management plans; development of Māori capacity to contribute to decision making, balancing of the budget, rating base information, reserve funds).

5      Work on the content and information required for the LTP is well underway.

6      As part of the development of the LTP, the Council is also required develop a Consultation Document to provide an effective basis for public participation in the Council’s decision-making processes relating to the content of the LTP.

7      The final LTP and Consultation Document must contain a report from the Auditor General.  To ensure the documents benefit fully from the audit process, an LTP audit staff working group has been established to facilitate this with Audit New Zealand.

DISCUSSION

Community outcomes

8      The purpose of the LTP is to describe the community outcomes of the local authority’s district or region and the LTP must, to the extent determined appropriate by the Council, describe the community outcomes for Dunedin (Section 93(6)(a) and Schedule 10, clause 1 of the LGA).

9      The Council currently has ten community outcomes.  Over the last five years, the Council has developed a strategic framework with eight key strategies. The requirement for local authorities to carry out a process to review the community outcomes every six years has been repealed. Even though there is no longer a requirement to review the community outcomes, it is proposed that the Council takes the opportunity to align the community outcomes with the eight key strategies.  Eight community outcome statements for the LTP have been developed based on the key strategies (refer to Attachment A).

10    The Council is also required to report the results of any measurement undertaken during the year of progress towards the achievement of community outcomes in the Annual Report (Schedule 10, clause 23(c) of the LGA). 

11    The Council currently has 46 community outcome indicators.  It is proposed the Council has sixteen ‘headline indicators;’ two for each of the key strategies / community outcome areas.  This would support the community to engage with tracking progress on the city’s success in achieving its desired outcomes; would simplify and streamline reporting on the strategies; and is in line with the direction other local authorities are proposing (refer to Attachment A).

Dunedin city profile

12    The draft Dunedin city profile sets the scene for the LTP and provides a key highlights overview of the current state of the Dunedin and what is changing. The draft Dunedin city profile is structured in three parts – around Dunedin’s people, economy and place (refer to Attachment B). The City Profile will be updated as more recent data becomes available, and this early approval enables staff to use the city profile to support early engagement in the LTP process.

Significant forecasting assumptions

13    The LTP must clearly identify all the significant forecasting assumptions (SFA) and risks underlying the financial estimates (Schedule 10, clause 17(a) of the LGA).  The SFA are utilised in future planning for infrastructure, service provision and land use.  Forecasts of growth and demand can be drivers of future expenditure.

14    A working group of staff (including Water and Waste; Corporate Policy; Finance; Enterprise Dunedin; and Risk) has reviewed the SFA in the LTP 2015, and has developed a list of strategic SFA for consideration by Council (Attachment C).  The operational SFA will be presented for consideration later in the year when data becomes available (e.g. inflation rates; interest rates; etc.).

15    The climate change projections are based on the latest Ministry for the Environment (MfE) climate change projections for New Zealand.  MfE have yet to release updated sea level rise projections and guidance for coastal hazards based on the Fifth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.  It is recommended existing climate change predictions for sea level rise be used until updated projections and guidance are released by MfE.

16    The growth projections are based on a report provided by Rationale Limited which project changes in resident population, residential dwellings, peak day visitors and rating units for a range of scenarios, for the 10-years to 2028 and subsequent periods (Attachment D).

OPTIONS

17    There are no options in this report.

NEXT STEPS

18    Staff will continue to develop the content and information required for the LTP; and approval will be sought at a number of points over the next 12 months from the Council as key deliverables of the LTP are developed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Tami  Sargeant  - Senior Policy Analyst

Suzie  Ballantyne  - Policy Analyst

Authoriser:

Maria Ioannou - Corporate Policy Manager

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Draft community outcome statements and headline indicators

198

b

Draft Dunedin city profile

199

c

Draft strategic significant forecasting assumptions

205

d

DCC Growth Projections Report - Rationale Limited

210

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the LTP enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The LTP contributes to all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities; the community outcomes; and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The LTP provides a mechanism for Māori to contribute to local decision-making.

Sustainability

The LTP contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the 30 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides an update on the development of the LTP 2018-2028.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.

Significance

This report is considered low significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There will be extensive community engagement throughout the development of the LTP 2018-2028.  Advice has been sought from AECOM and Rationale in the development of the strategic significant forecasting assumptions.

Engagement – internal

Staff and managers from across the Council are involved in the development of the LTP 2018-2028.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards will be involved in the development of the LTP 2018-2028.

 

 


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Appointment of Representative on the Regional Transport Committee

Department: Civic and Legal

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to propose that an elected member representative on the Regional Transport Committee is re-assigned.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Appoints Councillor O'Malley as the elected member representative on the Otago Regional Transport Committee

b)     Appoints Councillor Wilson as the alternate elected member representative on the Regional Transport Committee.

 

BACKGROUND

2      The Otago Regional Transport Committee (ORTC) is administered by the Otago Regional Council.  It is a body that has responsibility for preparing the Regional Land Transport Plan for Otago, as well as prioritising the significant transport projects within Otago. 

3      The Dunedin City Council appointed Councillor Wilson as its representative, with Councillor O'Malley acting as an alternate attendee.

DISCUSSION

4      Councillor O’Malley is proposed to be appointed as the Council’s representative. He is attending most meetings as Cr Wilson is committed on other Council business at the time that meetings of the ORTC are scheduled.

5      It is necessary to appoint Cr O'Malley because as an alternate appointee his meeting attendance, does not count towards a quorum and does not carry voting rights. 

6      An appointment would ensure that the Council can fully exercise the rights of committee membership by voting.

OPTIONS

7      As this is an administrative report, it is not necessary to present options for consideration or a summary of considerations.

NEXT STEPS

8      The Otago Regional Council has advised that it will confirm this appointment at their extraordinary meeting of 14 June 2017.

 

Signatories

Author:

Kristy Rusher - Manager Civic and Legal

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 

 


 

Appointment of members to the District Licensing Committee

Department: Civic and Legal

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to recommend to Council the addition of a member to the District Licensing Committee.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Appoints Councillor Stedman as a member of the District Licensing Committee for a period of 5 years.

b)     Decides to seek expressions of interest from individuals suitably qualified and experienced to be appointed as members of the District Licensing Committee.

 

BACKGROUND

2      The Council is required to appoint members of its District Licensing Committee to achieve a balance of skills and experience.   A District Licensing Committee is made up of a chairperson (currently Colin Weatherall) and two other members who are selected from a list of suitably experienced individuals.

DISCUSSION

3      To ensure that a range of interests are represented in decision making the Council has a practice of appointing a mixed panel comprising both elected members and also members of public.

4      A person may not be approved for appointment to a District Licensing Committee unless they have experience relevant to alcohol licensing matters.  Local Government New Zealand has also set a range of competencies which it is recommended that candidates for appointment meet (see 2015, Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 District Licensing Committee – Competency Guidance for DLC Members, Local Government New Zealand).

5      These include:

a)     Understanding of harm caused by alcohol consumption;

b)     Community knowledge within the area that the DLC operates;

c)     Quality decision making

d)     Hearing experience

e)     Strong communication

f)     Professional integrity

6      Councillor Stedman has appropriate experience and competencies as a result of his prior service with the New Zealand Police.  His role as Council appointment will replace Andrew Noone who has moved to the role of community appointment on the Committee.  Mr Noone will remain the deputy chair of the District Licensing Committee.

OPTIONS

7      As this is an administrative report, it is not necessary to provide options or a summary of considerations.

NEXT STEPS

8      A territorial authority must establish, maintain and publish a list of persons approved to be members of the District Licensing Committee (section 192 Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012).

9      The list of members appointed to the District Licensing Committee will be published.

10    Council will advertise for expressions of interest from interested community members over the next few months.

 

Signatories

Author:

Kristy Rusher - Manager Civic and Legal

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

 

Dunedin Hospital SOS Update

Department: Communications and Marketing

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an update on the activities that have been undertaken since Council resolved to communicate its opposition to any redevelopment of the hospital outside the central city. 

2      To date, over 4,000 people have sent SOS forms to central government in support of the central city location. A breakdown of the costs and activities is outlined in this report. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Dunedin Hospital SOS update. 

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      Dunedin Hospital has been earmarked to be redeveloped and central government has set aside $300 million to cover the costs of a new building.  Five location options are being reviewed:

(i)       To redevelop the hospital within the existing ward block

(ii)      To redevelop it on another inner city site

(iii)     To scatter the services in different sites across the city

(iv)     To build a new hospital on an unknown greenfield site

(v)      To move the hospital up to Wakari.

 

4      At its meeting on 21 February 2017 the Council resolved:

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Aaron Hawkins):

 

That the Council:

 

a)     Communicates to Government its complete opposition to a rebuild of Dunedin Hospital outside the central city

 

b)     Expresses a preference for the hospital to remain as close as possible to its current location

 

c)     Requests the immediate removal from consideration of any sites outside the scope of (a) and (b); and

 

d)     Asks other organisations, agencies and individuals who support this view to also convey it to Government.

 

Division

 

The Council voted by division.

 

For:         Crs David Benson-Pope, Rachel Elder, Christine Garey, Aaron Hawkins, Marie Laufiso, Damian Newell, Jim O'Malley, Chris Staynes, Conrad Stedman and Andrew Whiley and Mayor Dave Cull (11).

Against:    Crs Doug Hall, Mike Lord and Lee Vandervis (3).

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 11 votes to 3

 

Motion carried (CNL/2017/054)

 

5      To give effect to those resolutions, Dunedin Hospital SOS was developed and launched on Friday 24 March 2017.  It calls on central government to redevelop Dunedin Hospital as a top flight teaching hospital in the centre of the city. 

6      People who support the campaign are encouraged to visit the website, www.DunedinHospitalSOS.nz, to fill in an online form that can be emailed to Prime Minister Bill English, Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman, Minister of Finance and Minister for Infrastructure Steven Joyce, local MP Michael Woodhouse, Director-General of Health and Ministry of Health Chief Executive Chai Chuah, and Ministry of Health Director Critical Projects Michael Hundleby. 

7      As of 23 May, a total of 4,002 people had sent SOS forms in support of the central city location.

8      A total of $14,515.12 had been spent on Dunedin Hospital SOS to date.  A breakdown of these costs is detailed in the table below. 

Activity/collateral

Cost ($)

website

27.95

Flyer printing and distribution

7,330.00

Facebook videos production and promotion

2,420.00

FYI Dunedin May – additional costs

 

Stakeholder update newsletters

89.00

Media advertising

4,478.14

Printing of forms/posters

112.00

Setting up DX Freepost

58.03

Total

$14,515.12

 

DISCUSSION

9      A wide range of activities have been undertaken to support the Council resolution.

10    The website, www.DunedinHospitalSOS.nz, was launched on Friday 24 March.  The website enables people to submit an online SOS.  It also contains links to documents, media articles, videos and other information related to the campaign.  The cost of registering the website domain was $27.95.  

11    A flyer with information about, and seeking support from residents, was distributed to the letterboxes of all Dunedin households on and around Saturday 25 March.  The printing and distribution of the flyer cost $7,330. 

12    The May 2017 edition of the DCC's FYI newsletter to residents contained an information panel about Dunedin Hospital SOS and a tear‑off, freepost SOS form.  The newsletter is distributed to around 55,000 letterboxes in Dunedin.  As of 23 May 2017, around 1,150 people had returned a signed copy of the FYI tear-off form.  The additional cost of including a tear-off form in the FYI newsletter (printing and postage) is $8.00. 

13    Letters of support for the retention of a top flight teaching hospital in a central Dunedin location have been sent by Mayor of Dunedin Dave Cull, Clutha Mayor Bryan Cadogan, Queenstown-Lakes Mayor Jim Boult, Central Otago Mayor Tim Cadogan, Gore Mayor Tracy Hicks and Southland Mayor Gary Tong.  The letters are available on the website at www.dunedinhospitalsos.nz/documents.  Invercargill Mayor Tim Shadbolt has shown his support by fronting a video and in a media interview with The South Today

14    Councillors have led several 'pop-up' SOS signing sessions in the Centre City and Golden Centre malls, with people given the option of using an i-Pad to submit their SOS online, or given a hard copy form.  As well as gaining several hundred signatures, Councillors report these sessions have also been valuable for engaging with the community. 

15    A number of videos have been produced and broadcast via the Dunedin Hospital SOS Facebook page.  A breakdown of videos broadcast to date is outlined below.  At the time of writing this report, a video fronted by Age Concern Otago Executive Officer Debbie George was being produced. 

Facebook Videos

Date published

Reach + views

(as of 23 May)

Cost (production + promotion)

Mayor Dave Cull

24 March

21,428 (9,100 views)

$260.00

Resident vox pops 1

31 March

19,412 (10,000 views)

$186.00

Resident vox pops 2

2 April

5,956 (3,300 views)

$164.00

Otago Chamber of Commerce

7 April

18,205 (9,800 views)

$230.00

OUSA

19 April

26,427 (14,000 views)

$230.00

Otago Polytechnic

24 April

22,595 (12,000 views)

$230.00

Disabled Persons Assembly

5 May

16,344 (8,800 views)

$230.00

Dr Graham Mortimer

11 May

7,818 (3,900 views)

$230.00

Mayor of Invercargill

12 May

19,977 (12,000 views)

$230.00

Mayor Dave Cull update

19 May

10,283 (5,100 views)

$230.00

Total

 

168,445

(88,000 views)

$2,420.00

 

16    Three 'Save Our Site' stakeholder updates have been emailed to those who have submitted an SOS and indicated they want to receive progress.  The newsletters have been used to report on the latest organisations which have shown support, provide links to new videos, and encourage recipients to spread the word and encourage people to submit an SOS.  The costs of using the platform for distributing the electronic newsletter are $89.00. 

17    As of 23 May 2017, a total of $4,478.14 has been spent on other forms of media advertising.  A breakdown of this spending is below. 

Publication/Channel

Date published

Cost

Otago Daily Times

6 May

$521.64

ODT online

April/May

Within existing contract

The Star

4 May

$256.50

Channel 39 television ads

May-June

$1,700.00

Radio advertising

May-June

$2,000.00

Total

 

$4,478.14

 

OPTIONS

18    There are no options for this update report. 

NEXT STEPS

19    The Southern Partnership Group, which is leading the Dunedin Hospital redevelopment project, is due to complete its indicative business case revealing preferred options for redevelopment by the end of June. 

20    At this stage, Dunedin Hospital SOS will run until the indicative business case release is announced.  At that time, and depending on what the indicative business case reveals, the Council may wish to reconsider its approach. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Jamie Shaw - Senior Communications Advisor

Authoriser:

Graham McKerracher -  Communiciations and Marketing Manager

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report provides information outlining Council efforts to retain a top flight teaching hospital in the central city and enables democratic local decision making and action on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Dunedin Hospital SOS calls on central government to redevelop Dunedin Hospital as a top flight teaching hospital in the centre of the city.  If the hospital is moved away from the centre of the city or scattered across the city, there will be implications for some of the Council's strategic plans.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

If the hospital is moved out of the city it has potential long-term implications - both economic and social implications. 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

If the hospital is moved out of the CBD it may have implications for both the Annual Plan and the LTP in terms of infrastructure planning.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.

Significance

Dunedin Hospital SOS is of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. 

Engagement – external

The Community has been approached via a number of communications channels (see table in the report) and asked to send an online form that can be emailed to Prime Minister Bill English, Minister of Health Jonathan Coleman, Minister of Finance and Minister for Infrastructure Steven Joyce, local MP Michael Woodhouse, Director-General of Health and Ministry of Health Chief Executive Chai Chuah, and Ministry of Health Director Critical Projects Michael Hundleby.  Dunedin Hospital SOS calls on central government to redevelop Dunedin Hospital as a top flight teaching hospital in the centre of the city. 

Engagement - internal

No other departments have been consulted.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no direct implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

30 May 2017

 

 

 

Remuneration Authority - Consultation document

Department: Office of the Chief Executive

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The Remuneration Authority (the Authority) is currently reviewing various aspects of remuneration for Local Government elected members.  The review is in two parts.  The first part of the review requires a response from Council by 19 June 2017 and any changes will take effect in the new determination issued from 1 July 2017.  This report covers those matters.

2      The second part of the review covers broader issues and will be the subject of a separate report that will be presented to Council in advance of the 20 October 2017 deadline.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the proposed submission to the Remuneration Authority.

b)     Authorises the Mayor to make the submission on behalf of Council.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Authority is an independent body that sets remuneration rates for local body elected members. The Authority issues an annual determination that sets the level of remuneration and details various allowances and rates that apply in specific circumstances.

4      In advance of issuing the 2017 Determination, the Authority is seeking feedback on a number of matters and this report presents a suggested Council response to each of the matters raised by the Authority.

DISCUSSION

5      The Consultation Document issued by the Authority (Attachment 1) is broken into three parts.  Part One is the introduction.

6      The substantive matters that the Authority is seeking feedback on are dealt with in Parts Two and Three. This report deals with the Part Two issues which require a response by 19 June 2017.

7      The Part Three matters will be the subject of a separate report to Council in advance of the October 2017 deadline.

 

8      The format of the response is to restate the questions asked by the Authority and then to provide a suggested response from the Council.  For each of the questions, the Authority has provided commentary in the consultation document.  This commentary is attached and has not been restated in the body of this report.  The headings from the consultation document have been used to aid readability.

RMA Plan hearing fees

Do you agree that elected members who are sitting on plan hearings under the RMA should be remunerated in the same way as elected members who are sitting on resource consent hearings?

9      Proposed response: Yes.

Do you agree that elected members who chair such hearings should be remunerated for time spent writing up decisions?

10    Proposed response: Yes, but remuneration for writing decisions should not be limited to the Chair.  Often, panels collectively write decisions, taking a section each for example, in large hearings, and any member of a panel involved in writing a decision should be remunerated.

Leave of absence for elected members and acting mayor/chair payments

Do you agree that there should be provision for elected members to be granted up to six months leave of absence without pay?  If not, what should be the maximum length of time?

11    Proposed response: Yes.

Do you agree that additional remuneration can be made to the Deputy Mayor or Chair to act in the role under the circumstances outlined?

12    Proposed response: Yes.

If you disagree with any of the conditions, please state why.

13    Proposed response: Not applicable.

Are there any other conditions that should apply?

14    Proposed response: No. The conditions as identified are adequate.

Approach to expense policies

Do you agree that the Remuneration Authority should supply a prototype expenses policy that will cover all councils and that councils should be able to adopt any or all of it to the upper limit of the metrics within the policy?

15    Proposed response: Yes, this would be a simple and pragmatic way to deal with expenses.

Do you agree that each council's auditor should review their policy and also the application of the policy?

16    Proposed response: Yes.  We assume this means the external auditor and agree.

Provision of and allowances for information and communication technology and services, ICT hardware, internet usage and phone plans and unusual circumstances                                                                                                                                             

Do you agree that it should be common policy for councils to provide the ICT hardware proposed above for all elected members?

17    Proposed response: Yes. However, given that many Councils will have ICT arrangements in place for the current triennium, this proposed change should take effect in the new triennium.

Do you agree that exemptions to this policy would be limited to exceptional circumstances?

18    Proposed response: Yes, but there does need to be some latitude around what constitutes "exceptional circumstances".  If the policy is subject to audit as per the previous point, then the exceptional circumstances will be subject to third party review which will help ensure appropriate application.

Do you agree that a proportion of the ongoing cost of the use of home internet and personal mobile phones should be reimbursed as outlined above?

19    Proposed response: Agree regarding the proposals for internet use.  Disagree regarding the phone plan proposal.

If you disagree with either of these proposals, please give reasons and outline your alternatives.

20    The proposal regarding phone plans doesn't align well with procurement options that exist for Councils.  We currently purchase both the devices and plans using the All of Government (AoG) options that exist. This means we can provide very cheap plans for Councillors as part of the AoG offering.  The rate is significantly cheaper than non-AOG alternatives (includes unlimited texts, data and voice) and means the DCC gets very good value from the plans provided to Councillors.  Reimbursements are administratively expensive to manage.  A suggested alternative would be to set the maximum dollar amount at a level that equates with the AoG offering and not require reimbursements.  Consideration also needs to be given for arrangements when elected members may be overseas on Council business.  The AoG offering provides fixed daily rates for data, texts and voice and an allowance needs to be made for this.

Do you agree with the "unusual circumstance" provision in para 49 above?

21    Proposed response: Yes.

Travel time allowance

Do you agree that the current policy on travel time allowance should be continued?

22    Proposed response: Yes.

If not, please state reasons for change.

23    Proposed response: Not applicable.

Mileage claims

Do you agree with the proposed change to the current 5000km rule?

24    Proposed response: Yes.

If not, what should it be and why?

25    Proposed response: Not applicable.

Do you agree with the proposal to retain the 30km rule in its current form?

26    Proposed response: Yes.

If not, what should this rule be?

27    Proposed response: Not applicable.

OPTIONS

28    Council needs to consider the points and decide if it wishes to provide a response to the Authority.  If it does then it is recommended that the Mayor be authorised to submit the response on behalf of Council.

NEXT STEPS

29    Once Council determines its view on the proposed response, staff will formalise the response in a letter to the Authority and submit by the due date of 19 June 2017.

30    The Authority has also proposed a series of longer term proposals that require consideration by Council and Community Boards.  The longer term proposal indicates the Authority is looking at significant changes to the current remuneration model.  These changes will be assessed by staff and then information circulated to both Councillors and Community Board members for feedback before a report is presented to Council for consideration in September 2017.

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Local Government Review - Consultation Document

282

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision/report/proposal enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Councillor remuneration is an administrative decision.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

Any changes made by the Authority will be reflected in operating budgets.

Significance

The matter is of low significance when assessed against the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

Councillors have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest

Community Boards

Part Two of the consultation has no implications for Community Boards but Part Three does. Boards will be fully consulted in the preparation of the response to Part Three.

 

 


CONSULTATION DOCUMENT

LOCAL GOVERNMENT REVIEW

 

Part One - General Introduction

 

Introduction

1.    The Remuneration Authority (the Authority) is required to issue a new determination, taking effect from 1st July 2017, covering local government elected members. In considering how we should approach this in future, we have concluded that there is an opportunity for both short term improvements to the system, including some clarification of current policies, as well as some deeper changes which we propose introducing in 2019.

 

2.    Hence this paper has two substantive sections – Part Two covering proposals for this year and Part Three covering the longer term. We are seeking views of councils on both. The timetable for responses on the shorter-term proposals is unfortunately short. This is because as we got deeper into our review we saw the need for more fundamental change which, had we waited till we had all detail finalised, would have delayed our release of this paper. However, we feel that the issues in Part Two are sufficiently familiar for councils that they will be able to provide reasonably rapid responses.  In contrast, Part Three contains more fundamental change proposals and we believe that the local government sector needs time to contemplate these. We have provided a window of several months and during that time we would anticipate attending either zone or sector meetings to discuss the proposals with you.

 

3.    Recently the issue of the potential provision of child care subsidies or services has been raised. We have not addressed it in this paper but will be consulting the sector shortly about this issue.

 

4.    The Authority would like to thank a number of people who have assisted us with the review so far.  We commissioned ErnstYoung to provide facilitation, research and analysis. The following people also provided assistance and we very much appreciated their insights and information:

·    Local Government Leadership Group:

David Ayers, Mayor, Waimakariri District

Jan Barnes, Mayor, Matamata-Piako District

Brendan Duffy, Independent Consultant and former Vice-President LGNZ

Justin Lester, Mayor, Wellington City

Jane Nees, Deputy Chair, Bay of Plenty Regional Council

Rachel Reese, Mayor, Nelson City

·    Local Government New Zealand:

Lawrence Yule, President

Mike Reid, Principal Policy Advisor

·    Local Government Commission:

Suzanne Doig, Chief Executive Officer

Donald Riezebos, Principal Advisor

·    Local Government Officials:

Dennis Bush-King, Tasman District Council

Miranda Cross, Greater Wellington Regional Council

John O’Shaughnessy, Hastings District Council

·    Central Government Officials

Deborah Brunning, Statistics New Zealand

Sarah Lineham, Office of the Auditor-General

James Stratford, Department of Internal Affairs

·    Alistair Gray, Statistics Research Associates Limited

 

Legal requirements for the Authority when setting remuneration

5.    The work of the Authority is governed by the Remuneration Authority Act 1977, which has had several amendments since it was first enacted. This act and the Local Government Act 2002 contain the statutory requirements which the Authority must follow when making determinations for local government elected members. They are summarised below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Role of local government

6.    In undertaking this review the Authority has looked at past thinking on local government remuneration. One particular document[1], issued by Local Government NZ in 1997, contained a thoughtful summary of the role of local government.

 

7.    The document said:

“The strength of representative democracy ultimately depends on two factors. One is the level of citizen participation and trust in democratic institutions. The other is the ability and commitment of elected representatives and their role in encouraging participation and promoting levels of trust.

Local government constitutes one of the underpinning structures of democratic society, providing ‘voice and choice’ to citizens and communities, and the mechanism for making decisions about local needs and preferences. It also provides a forum to debate issues of mutual interest and concern.

Good local government depends upon the goodwill and understanding of it citizens, and the quality of its staff. Most of all, however, it depends on the ability of those elected to govern. Attracting people with the capacity to lead and govern at local level involves a number of factors. These include:

·    The opportunity to contribute effectively, be professionally valued and receive a sense of satisfaction at achieving a job well done

·    The existence of structures and processes to support and professionally advise elected members and enable them to contribute constructively on matters of community importance

·    The presence of consultative and participative arrangements that strengthen relationships between and with their communities

·    The existence of a remuneration system that enables people from all sectors of the community to commit time and effort necessary to fulfil their responsibilities as elected members without being unduly disadvantaged.”

 

8.    In our view, this characterisation of local government has not changed since it was written twenty years ago.


 

Part Two – Proposed Immediate Changes (2017 Determination)

 

Introduction 

9.    The Authority is seeking the views of local government (i.e. territorial authorities, unitary councils and regional councils) on the proposals set out below in this section of the paper. These changes will affect elected mayors, chairs and councillors from each council including Auckland (councillors and local board members). Part of it will also affect community board members.

 

10.  Please note that we are seeking the views of councils, not of individual elected members or staff.

 

11.  We would appreciate any feedback that councils wish to give to be emailed to us by 5pm Monday 19th June 2017 or earlier if you can. Please email to info@remauthority.govt.nz

 

RMA Plan hearing fees

12.  Current practice is that those elected representatives who are undertaking resource consent hearings can receive an hourly fee which is determined three-yearly by the Authority and which is not included in the council’s pool of money to cover payment for additional positions of responsibility. This has not applied to other hearings conducted under the Resource Management Act (RMA). Nor does it apply to hearings for a plethora of other plans or policies developed by councils under different pieces of legislation.

 

13.  The Authority has received many enquiries and suggestions from councils on this issue. In particular, there is growing concern about the treatment of often-protracted hearings of District Plans, Regional Policy Statements and other land, air, coastal and water plans under the RMA.

 

14.  We have looked at the range of council plans that involve hearings and believe that many of them could be considered part of “business as usual” for councillors.

 

15.  However, of particular concern is that councillors who sit on RMA plan hearings are required to be accredited commissioners. This means that they must have undertaken the Making Good Decisions course and they must renew their credentials every three years. The requirements for councillors are in this respect the same as for non-councillor commissioners and there is a cost in both time and money to gain and maintain the accreditation.

 

16.  Because of the technical and legal nature of plan hearings, they tend to take months and, in some cases, can span an election period. This is especially the case if the hearing covers a review of the whole plan.

 

17.  The Authority is aware of the increasing trend for councils to engage external commissioners as members of the panel for these plan hearings. This use of external contractors is being driven by several considerations, including time requirements, unavailability of sufficient numbers of councillors who are qualified commissioners, or a view that because councillors have developed the plans as part of their core business, the hearings should be conducted by a different set of independent commissioners. External commissioners are paid an hourly rate for the work. In some cases, a council will use a mixed panel of external commissioners and councillors, which clearly creates a disparity between panel members. 

 

18.  Because of these factors, we agree that any such hearings should be treated in the same way as resource consent hearings under the RMA insofar as councillor remuneration is concerned.

 

19.  The Authority is proposing that an hourly rate should be paid to councillors who are members of such hearing panels.

 

20.  The rate would be set every three years by the Authority, as with payments for consent hearings. It will apply to site visits, reading (not to exceed the hearing time) and, in the case of an elected person chairing such a committee, the hourly rate would also cover the time spent in writing the decisions. For clarity, we also propose that this last provision be included for elected members who are chairing resource consent hearings.

 

 

·  Do you agree that elected members who are sitting on plan hearings under the RMA should be remunerated in the same way as elected members who are sitting on resource consent hearings?

 

·  Do you agree that elected members who chair such hearings should be remunerated for time spent writing up decisions?

 

 

Leave of absence for elected members and acting mayor/chair payments

21.  From time to time a councillor or mayor/chair needs extended leave of absence from council work. This could be for personal reasons such as family/ parental leave, extended holiday, illness or, in some cases, when standing for another public office. On these occasions the Authority is asked whether or not a council can grant such leave and, if it involves a mayor or chair, whether an additional payment can be made to the person (legally prescribed as the deputy) who is acting in place of the mayor/chair.

 

22.  We have looked at the rules for governance boards in the state sector for guidance and adapted those rules for local government elected members. Rather than an ad hoc approach, we propose the following:

Councillors:

·    Leave of absence without pay can be granted for a period of up to six months (maximum) by formal resolution of the council.

·    The leave must involve total absence. The councillor cannot be present for any duties either formal or informal – this includes council meetings, meetings with external parties and constituent work. Nor can the councillor speak publicly on behalf of the council or represent it on any issues.

·    The councillor’s remuneration and allowances ceases during the period for which leave of absence is granted.

Mayors/Chairs:

·   Leave of absence without pay can be granted for a period of up to six months (maximum) by formal resolution of the council.

·   Notwithstanding the above, the period must be longer than a single cycle of council meetings, whether that be monthly or six weekly or whatever. This is because we consider that one of the key roles of a deputy mayor/chair is to cover for short absences by the mayor/chair, but that a longer absence would necessarily put an unexpected extended work burden on the deputy.

·   If the deputy is to be paid extra remuneration for the period concerned, the leave must involve total absence. The mayor/chair cannot be present for any duties either formal or informal – this includes council meetings, meetings with external parties and constituent work. Nor can the mayor/chair speak publicly on behalf of the council or represent it on any issues.

·   The remuneration to mayor/chair ceases during the whole of the period for which leave of absence is granted and the deputy is acting in the role.

·   Allowances including a mayor/chair vehicle will also be unavailable to the mayor/chair during that period, but would be available to the acting mayor/chair.

·   We propose that under these circumstances the council may pay that deputy a sum up to the normal remuneration of the mayor/chair in place of the normal remuneration received by the deputy.

 

23.  Councils may make decisions within the parameters of these rules but must inform the Authority as soon as possible.

 

24.  We have reflected on the proposed six-month period and consider that it is likely to require exceptional circumstances for an absence of that period to be granted, especially to someone in a leadership positon on a council. It would mean that the constituents who elected that person would be unrepresented or, under a multiple-member ward, less represented, than would normally be the case. This would be an electoral risk that the person concerned would need to consider carefully. However there may be circumstances where it is appropriate so we are proposing that the maximum period would be six months.

 

25.  A further issue is the extension of an acting role beyond the anticipated length of time – for example, if the incumbent were elected to another role and there needed to be a by-election. Under those circumstances, if the incumbent is the mayor or chair, and the deputy was acting in the role, that the acting role may need to be extended for a further period, perhaps up to three months. In that case, we advise that councils make a new, separate decision regarding the remuneration and allowances.

 

 

 

·  Do you agree that there should be provision for elected members to be granted up to six months leave of absence without pay? If not, what should be the maximum length of time?

 

·  Do you agree that additional remuneration can be made to the deputy mayor or chair to act in the role under the circumstances outlined?

 

·  If you disagree with any of the conditions, please state why.

 

·  Are there any other conditions that should apply?

 

 

 

Approach to expense policies

26.  The current approach is for each council to send in their policy to the Authority every three years for approval. In between we often receive requests for assistance in interpreting the provisions in the determination.  We are aware of the need for policies to be more transparent and for greater clarity in the explanatory notes, both in determination and on our website.

 

27.  We have looked at many council expense policies and it is clear that some are struggling to develop them, possibly because small staff size does not provide any depth of expertise in this area. On the other hand, some policies are highly developed and contain clear guidance as to what is permitted and under what circumstances.

 

28.  We are thus proposing that instead of each council needing to develop a policy from scratch and then gain approval from us, we work with local government to develop a prototype policy that could be adopted by all councils.

 

29.  The metrics in such a prototype would obviously be the top (maximum) of the allowed range, so any council wanting to pay/reimburse less (or even nothing at all) would be free to do so.

30.  With respect to the current role of the Authority in authorising or checking such policies, this is enabled by the legislation and has been required in our previous determinations.  However, the Authority proposes that such compliance audits should be part of the role of local government auditors who should check council expenses policies to ensure conformity to the Determination. Auditors should also be assessing whether councils are actually following their own agreed policies in this area.

 

 

 

·  Do you agree that the Remuneration Authority should supply a prototype expenses policy that will cover all councils and that councils should be able to adopt any or all of it to the upper limit of the metrics within the policy?

 

·  Do you agree that each council’s auditor should review their policy and also the application of the policy?

 

 

Provision of and allowances for information and communication technology and services

31.  A communications allowance has been included in the determination since 2008, and was introduced to bring some equity across the country in the reimbursement of costs and the provision of such support to elected members.

 

32.  The continuing development of information and communication technology (ICT) has led the Authority to reconsider the allowance. Our view is that elected members should not carry the costs of communicating with councils or with residents.

 

33.  Mobile technology is now ubiquitous and so much business is now conducted digitally that mobile phones and tablets are considered tools of trade in many businesses, in both the private and public sectors. It is no longer considered to be a personal benefit for a person to have her/his basic technology integrated with that of the business.

 

34.  The Authority’s preferred approach in the past was that councils provided the necessary equipment, consumables and servicing, as well as reimbursement (on proof of expenditure) of other costs that might occur. However, there was also provision for hardware costs incurred by elected members to be partly reimbursed.

 

35.  Given recent changes in both the business environment and in technology, we are now of the view that all councils should provide an appropriate council-owned technology suite for their elected members. The two exceptions to this are payment for the use of broadband, which can vary greatly depending on the nature of the household of the elected member, and payment for phone usage.

 

36.  The complexities of ensuring that security is kept up to date mean that elected members are likely to find it increasingly difficult to manage the technical demands of being part of a larger organisation, which may have more stringent standards than they would have for their own personal technology. For the councils, there should be a major benefit in having all elected members using identical technology and systems, managed efficiently and effectively by the council’s ICT officials. Councils often have complex software driving different parts of their systems (e.g. water plants) and possess large databases of residents and ratepayers. Managing these systems in a robust way and decreasing the possibility of cyber-attack is a challenge and will be assisted if there are fewer different entry points into the main system. This is also a protection for both the council and for residents/ratepayers who may have privacy concerns.

 

ICT hardware

37.  It is the responsibility of each council to decide the communications equipment needed to carry out its business effectively and efficiently. Decisions about equipment for individual councillors should flow from that. We note that councils should be able to get good purchasing leverage on equipment and on usage plans to keep costs down.

 

38.  We propose that councils provide all elected members with the following equipment:

·    a mobile phone

·    a tablet or laptop

·    a monitor and keyboard if required, plus the hardware to connect the various pieces of equipment

·    a printer

·    a connection to the internet.

 

39.  Consumables such as paper and ink should also be supplied by the council as required by the elected member.

 

40.  In the past, there has been a desire by some elected members to utilise their own communication equipment to undertake council business, possibly because of unwillingness to segregate personal and council usage on the same device. Now it is commonplace for people to have more than one account on one computer, so the issue of carrying round an additional tablet should no longer apply.

 

41.  Equipment would remain the property of the council and be replaced or updated as part of the council’s asset renewal programme – presumably triennially. This would allow councils to obtain the advantages of bulk purchase and ensure maximum efficiency by providing equipment that is consistent across the organisation, fit for purpose and adequately protected to provide security and privacy for ratepayers, elected members and staff.

 

42.  Where there is a strong reason for the council not to supply the technology, the Authority would need to make a decision allowing that council to put in place a reimbursement system. We note that there is a cost in time and money to all parties in managing such a system and it would have the inherent technology security weaknesses described above. In such cases, exceptional circumstances would need to exist before the Authority was prepared to move to a reimbursement system. In addition, in the interests of efficiency, the reimbursement system would need to apply to the whole council, not just to a few councillors.

 

43.  Where council decided to provide an allowance for the use of personal ICT hardware, it should cover all ICT equipment used by members and the Authority would prescribe an upper limit for expenditure. This would represent three years’ depreciation on the hardware (mobile phone, tablet/laptop, printer, monitor, keyboard, installation of an internet connection) plus an assumption that half the usage would be on council business. The allowance can be paid monthly or at the beginning of a triennium. 

 

Internet usage and phone plans

44.  Previously the Authority considered the extent to which the costs of data and phone use were apportioned between council and elected member. This can be complex and will reflect differing household usage as well as council usage. For example, in a household which already has personal usage close to their broadband cap, the increased traffic required to move to electronic papers may require an increase in monthly band usage, even though the data transmitted is modest compared to other internet and electronic traffic.

 

45.  With regard to home broadband, we propose that elected members should be responsible for their own plan. The Authority previously determined that no more than 25% of the usage charges could be regarded as bona fide additional costs incurred by an elected member in carrying out council business. We accept that this is still the case but note that there is now a huge variety and combination of plans available for home broadband, so arriving at an “average” is simply not possible. We therefore propose that councils continue to reimburse up to 25% of a maximum dollar amount to each elected member to cover internet usage costs, on production of receipts. The Authority would review the percentage and the maximum amount every three years.

 

46.  The use of mobile phones as a primary form of communication is increasing exponentially. Alongside this is a proliferation of different types of plans for mobile phones, paralleling what is happening in home broadband connections.  The difference between home internet use and phone use is that for the home broadband, anyone else in the household can access the internet connection, whereas a phone is a personal device. We therefore consider that, except for mayors and chairs, elected members should receive reimbursement of up to half the cost of their personal mobile phone usage up to a maximum dollar amount, on production of receipts. If the council owns the plan, the same rule would apply as for home broadband use - the council would pay for half the annual usage cost with a capped dollar amount and the elected member would need to reimburse the council for the rest. Elected members would be charged for all private international calls.

 

47.  For mayors and chairs the council should cover the total cost of the plan, except that the user will be charged for private international calls.

 

Unusual circumstances

48.  Over the years the Authority has occasionally been approached to cover the one-off costs of providing connection access or non-standard equipment where regular landline or mobile coverage is not available. We propose to continue the current policy, which is that where such circumstances exist, the council may put a costed recommendation to the Authority for approval to make a one-off payment for installation and either a reimbursement or allowance for on-going maintenance and support reflecting the costs involved. It is anticipated this allowance will normally reflect no more than 75% of the costs involved.

 

 

 

·  Do you agree that it should be common policy for councils to provide the ICT hardware proposed above for all elected members?

 

·  Do you agree that exemptions to this policy would be limited to exceptional circumstances?

 

·  Do you agree that a proportion of the ongoing cost of the use of home internet and personal mobile phones should be reimbursed as outlined above?

 

·  If you disagree with either of these proposals, please give reasons and outline your alternatives.

 

·  Do you agree with the “unusual circumstance” provision in para 49 above?

 

Travel time allowance

49.  We do not propose to make any changes to the approach on travel time allowances. This provides for all elected members who are not full time to be eligible for an hourly allowance when travelling on business for the council or community board in respect of any travel exceeding an hour and assuming the fastest form of transport. The rate is set by the Authority and is reviewed each three years.


 

 

 

·  Do you agree that the current policy on travel time allowance should be continued?

 

·  If not, please state reasons for change.

 

 

Mileage claims

50.  About two thirds of all mayors/chairs take up their entitlement to have a dedicated vehicle provided for them by the council. Others choose to use their own vehicle for a variety of reasons but often, we understand, because of a belief that their constituents will not approve of them having the “perk” of a council vehicle. Our view is that for mayors/chairs, who normally travel great distances each year, the car is a “tool of trade” and an entitlement rather than a “perk”. In any other occupation, people who travelled the distances clocked up by most mayors/chairs would be provided with a company car rather than having to use their own.

 

51.  We have checked the distances travelled annually by mayors/chairs. The average and the median are both around 22,000 to 23,000km a year. Unsurprisingly the distances vary greatly – from 35,000km down to a few thousand – though we wonder if the lower level reflects the fact that some who use their own vehicles claim very little. In fact at least three make no claims whatsoever.

 

52.  Currently we utilise NZ Automobile Association metrics regarding the cost of running a vehicle and we use IRD formula for mileage rate reimbursement. We propose to continue to use these benchmarks, which will be updated as appropriate. The one exception is that in recognition of the fact that mayors/chairs using their private vehicles are likely to be in the medium/high group of users of their own cars for work purposes, we propose to alter the formula around the application of the higher and lower IRD rates.

 

53.  At present the higher rate (currently 74 cents per km) applies to the first 5000km travelled on council business and the remaining distance on council business is reimbursed at a rate of 37 cents per km. We propose that above that first 5000km, which would act as a base, mayors/chairs using their own vehicles should be reimbursed at the higher rate for the first 25% of the remaining distance they travel on council business.

 

54.  We have no data about councillor use of personal vehicles on council business and we assume that distances travelled would normally be less than that of a mayor - but not always, especially in the case of a “distant” ward. Regardless, we propose that the formula outlined above also applies to councillor travel reimbursement.

 

 

 

 

·  Do you agree with the proposed change to the current 5000km rule?

 

·  If not, what should it be and why?

 

 

55.  The other issue which we are frequently asked to clarify is the “30km rule”. We propose to keep this approach. Basically it recognises that virtually all New Zealanders have to pay the cost of their own transport to and from their work place. However, elected members also have other work in other places. The 30 km rule is based on an assessment that most people would live within 15 km of their work place. That means that a “round trip” to and from the “work place” – i.e. the normal council meeting place – can be claimed only if it is above 30km. If the trip to and from the council’s normal meeting place is above 30km, the first 30km are always deducted. This means that if an elected member lives closer than 15km, then no claim can be made for attending a meeting at the council office.  If a member must come to the office twice in one day, if she/he is not simply taking the opportunity to go home for lunch, then the whole of the distance for the second trip may be claimed. This assumes that most workers travel to and from work only once per day, but recognises that elected members may have a formal meeting, say in the morning, then another meeting much later in the afternoon. We except common sense to prevail in councils when authorising such claims.

 

56.  With regard to work of elected members outside of the normal council meeting place, the full mileage can be claimed. That means that the elected member may claim from her or his home to the address of the meeting or event and back again by the shortest route.

 

57.  If an elected member has an additional place of residence (e.g. a holiday home) the primary place of residence, normally identified by being her/his address on the electoral role, will be considered the official residence.

 

58.  If a council is holding one of its normal meetings in a different venue - for example in an outlying town - then the full mileage can be claimed. However, we expect common sense to prevail. If the exceptional meeting place is just down the road from the normal venue then the 30km rule would apply.

 

 

 

·   Do you agree with the proposal to retain the 30km rule in its current form?

 

·   If not, what should this rule be?

 

 

Mayor/chair car valuations

59.  We do not propose to make any changes to the valuation of the mayor/chair motor vehicle at this stage.  The formula is consistent with the methodologies applied to valuing motor vehicles for full private use in public sector roles.  The Authority’s formula goes one step further in that it recognises that a greater proportion of vehicle usage by a mayor/chair is spent on council business rather than on personal use.

 

60.  The formula and associated variables used to value mayor/chair motor vehicles will be reviewed with the main determination triennially.  Any changes will be applied in election year.

 

Annual changes in remuneration

61.  The main local government determination will usually be applied in election year, then in the intervening two years we propose to change remuneration to reflect changes in the Labour Market Statistics (LMS) – (see Part Three for more details on the timetable).

 

Changes following an election

62.  The Authority is aware that there has been some confusion in the past regarding the exact days on which payment ceases for outgoing elected representatives and commences for those who are newly elected, and around remuneration continuing for those who are re-elected.

 

63.  The following outlines the legal situation:

·    All newly elected and re-elected local government members come into office the day after the results are publicly notified under S.86 of the Local Electoral Act 2001.

·    All sitting members vacate office on the same day.


 

Part Three – Longer Term Proposals

 

Introduction

64.  The Authority is seeking the views of local government (i.e. territorial authorities, unitary councils and regional councils) on the proposals set out below in this section of the paper. These changes will affect elected mayors, chairs and councillors, as well as community bard members, from every council except Auckland.  Later this year we will be issuing an additional consultation paper on the Auckland Council, following the completion of its governance review. However, we are proposing that the general principles outlined in this paper around council sizing should apply to Auckland.

 

65.  Please note that we are seeking the views of councils, not of individual elected members or staff.

 

66.  We would appreciate feedback to info@remauthority.govt.nz by Friday October 20th 2017. Please email to info@remauthority.govt.nz

 

Recent history of local government remuneration setting by the Authority

67.  In late 2011 the Authority issued a discussion document - Review of Local Authority Remuneration Setting. This was followed in November 2012 by a further document - Remuneration Setting Proposals for Local Authorities - which outlined the system that the Authority was proposing to institute from the 2013 election. A copy of that document is attached as Appendix 1. It transpired that for a variety of reasons in the years 2014 to 2016 the Authority did not completely implement the proposed process. However, significant elements are in place. Importantly, the work which the Authority commissioned from the Hay Group in 2015 remains current in our view and has provided useful data to assist with our current considerations.

 

68.  To assist with context, the main elements of the 2013 proposal are summarised below. They were:

a)    Moving away from the traditional salary/meeting fee mix for local government remuneration.

b)    Creating a size index for councils derived from population and council expenditure.

c)    Basing the remuneration for councillors/mayors/chairs on:

·     the relative place of the council in the size index;

·     the job size of the positions as assessed for sample councils;

·     the proportion of full time work as demonstrated by survey results;

·     the Authority’s pay scale.

d)    Providing a pool for each council equivalent to one councillor’s remuneration to be allocated for additional positions of responsibility.

e)    Reviewing local government remuneration approximately two years after each election and setting the base remuneration for councillor and mayor/chair roles at the beginning of each election year, together with provision for changes in positions of responsibility within each council.

f)     Recalculating annually each council’s place on the size index and, in the following July determination, automatically applying any increase warranted, with the proviso that any reductions in the base remuneration would not be implemented during the term of that council.

g)    Providing a loading of 12.5% for unitary council remuneration to recognise their additional regional responsibilities.

h)    Retaining arrangements for resource consent hearings whereby elected members can be paid an hourly fee in addition to their base remuneration.

i)     Requiring councils to confirm their expenses policies only in election year rather than annually.

j)     Retaining valuation methodology for mayor/chair vehicles with adjustments made each year on July 1 to coincide with the determination.

k)    Various changes to community board remuneration setting.

 

69.  The new system was in place for the 2013 Determination in which the Authority made the following comment: “Aware of its responsibility of fairness to both elected members and ratepayers, the Authority moderated both increases and decreases to smooth the transition to the new system”.

 

70.  In the 2014 Determination, the same comment was made with the additional comment that “this approach was continued, with moderation to reflect wage growth, this year”.