Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Community and Culture Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                             Tuesday 17 October 2017

Time:                            1.00 pm

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Community and Culture Committee

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Aaron Hawkins

 

Deputy Chairperson

Rachel Elder

Marie Laufiso

Members

David Benson-Pope

Dave Cull

 

Christine Garey

Doug Hall

 

Mike Lord

Damian Newell

 

Jim O'Malley

Chris Staynes

 

Conrad Stedman

Lee Vandervis

 

Andrew Whiley

Kate Wilson

 

Senior Officer                               Simon Pickford, General Manager Community Services

 

Governance Support Officer      Jenny Lapham

 

 

 

Jenny Lapham

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Jenny.Lapham@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Public Forum                                                                                             4

1.1   Public Forum - Finn Boyle                                                                     4

1.2   Public Forum - Nikolao Cockerall                                                            4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5   

Minutes of Committees

5          Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board - 20 September 2017                                15   

Part A Reports (Committee  has power to decide these matters)

6          Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities - July to August 2017       19

7        Community and Culture Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 30 September 2017                                                                                      39

8        Ara Toi and City of Literature Update - January - June 2017                             51

9        Public Art Framework 2017-22                                                                    64

10      New Zealand Masters Games Operational and Financial Status                         105

11      Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust CCO Exemption                         111

12      Items for Consideration by the Chairperson            

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                           117

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

1     Public Forum

1.1  Public Forum - Finn Boyle

Finn Boyle wishes to address the meeting to provide a report back on the Aspiring Leaders Forum. .

1.2  Public Forum - Nikolao Cockerall

Nikolao Cockerall, wishes to address the meeting concerning on the Aspiring Leaders Forum.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting

 

 

        RECOMMENDATIONS

       

        That the Committee:

 

        Confirms the agenda with the following alteration:

 

-        In regard to Standing Order 2.1, Option C be adopted in relation to moving and seconding and speaking to amendments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Register of Interest

7

  



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17 October 2017

 

 

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

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Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

Minutes of Committees

Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board - 20 September 2017

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes Part A items and public forum of the minutes of the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board meeting held on 20 September 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board held on 20 September 2017

16

  


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


 

Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board

UNCONFIRMED MINUTES

 

Unconfirmed minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board held in the Toitu Otago Settlers Association Board Room, Toitu Otago Settlers Museum, 31 Queens Gardens, Dunedin on Wednesday 20 September 2017, commencing at 9.00 am

 

PRESENT

 

Chairperson

Phil Dowsett

 

Deputy Chairperson

 

 

Members

Rachel Elder

Doug Hall

 

Aaron Hawkins

Dot Page

 

Susan Schweigman

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Bernie Hawke (Group Manager Arts and Culture, Jennifer Evans (Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Director)

 

Governance Support Officer      Rebecca Murray

 

 

  

 

1       Apologies

There were no apologies.

 

2       Confirmation of agenda

 

 

Moved (Mr Phil Dowsett/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Committee:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration

 

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/017)

 

 

3       Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

Moved (Mr Phil Dowsett/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Committee:

 

a)     Notes the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/018)

 

4       Confirmation of Minutes

4.1    Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board meeting - 2 August 2017

 

Moved (Mr Phil Dowsett/Mrs Susan Schweigman):

That the Committee:

 

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board meeting held on 2 August 2017 as a correct record.

 

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/019)

Reports

5       Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Activity Report

 

A report covered the activities of Toitū Otago Settlers Museum for the period 1-31 July 2017.

 

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Doug Hall):

That the Committee:

 

a)     Notes the Toitū Otago Settlers Museum Activity Report.

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/020

              

 

6       Acknowledgement of Service

 

 

It was noted that Dr Dorothy Page was retiring from the Otago Settlers Association, the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum Board acknowledged Dr Page’s contribution over the years.  A new representative will be appointed in due course.

 

 

 

Moved (Mr Phil Dowsett/Cr Aaron Hawkins):

That the Committee:

 

a)      Express its sincere gratitude to Dr Dorothy Page for her dedication and tireless commitment to serving the community.

Motion carried (TOSM/2017/021)

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 9.45am.

 

 

 

..............................................

CHAIRPERSON

   

 

  


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

Part A Reports

 

Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities - July to August 2017

Department: Corporate

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1      The attached report, prepared by Otago Museum, provides an update on the key activities from July to August 2017.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Community and Culture Committee:

a)     Notes the Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities – July to August 2017.

 

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Otago Museum Report to Contributing Local Authorities - July to August 2017

21

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing local infrastructure and a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective by monitoring activity.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts on tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no known implications, as funding this activity is provided for in the LTP.

Financial considerations

No financial information presented.  The Council contributed funding of $4.023 million in the 2016/17 year.

Significance

Significance has been assessed as low in terms of Council's Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no known implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

Community and Culture Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 30 September 2017

Department: Arts and Culture and Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Committee on key city, community, arts and culture outcomes for the quarter ended 30 September 2017.

2      There have been small percentage increases in satisfaction with community and with culture facilities across all measures.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Community and Culture Non-Financial Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 30 September 2017.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Community and Planning group of activities works with other agencies to set the direction for managing Dunedin’s built and natural environment. It also works to enable a strong sense of community and social inclusion through the provision of advice and support to community groups and social agencies, and provides events for the enjoyment of residents and visitors.

4      The Arts and Culture group of activities operates Dunedin Public Libraries, the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum, the Dunedin Chinese Garden and the Olveston Historic Home.

DISCUSSION

5      The Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS) is the principle mechanism by which the Council measures resident satisfaction with a wide range of its activities.

6      From July 2016 the ROS has been conducted on a continuous monthly basis, aiming to obtain around 100 responses each month, to replicate the average annual sample size of around 1,200 obtained in previous years. The quarterly results in the graphs below generally reflect the responses of around 300 residents. A sample of 300 has an expected 95% confidence interval (margin of error) of +/- 5.7%, whereas the annual result for 2015/16 had a margin of error of +/- 2.5%. Results for the year will continue to be published in the annual ROS report at year end. Notable measures are listed in the balance of this report.

Satisfaction with Community

7      A 2% increase in satisfaction with ‘sense of community’ was reported as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available. 

Satisfaction with Festivals and Events

8      An 8% increase in satisfaction with ‘city festival and events’ was reported as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available. 


 

Satisfaction with Cultural Facilities

9      A 7% decrease in satisfaction with Dunedin Public Libraries was reported as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available. 

10    A 5% increase in satisfaction with Dunedin Public Art Gallery was reported as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available. 


 

11    There is no change in satisfaction with Toitū Otago Settlers Museum as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available.  

12    There is no change in satisfaction with Dunedin Chinese Garden as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available. 


 

13    Satisfaction with Dunedin Olveston Historic Home was introduced in 2016. A 2% decrease in satisfaction was reported as at 31 August 2017. September results are currently not available. 

14    Visitor numbers to the Dunedin Public Libraries decreased by 5.9% for the first quarter of 2017/18. A key factor impacting the level of visitor numbers includes the availability of free Wi-Fi for visitors in an increasing range of alternative locations, and is related to a decline in borrowing. 


 

15    Visitor numbers to the Dunedin Public Art Gallery for the first quarter of 17/18 are tracking to reach end of year targets. Winter is traditionally our slowest month and we have not had a popular interactive show this reporting period as we have in other years. Summer is traditionally when our numbers increase so we are expecting to gain ground in the next quarter – as is traditional.

16    Visitor numbers to Toitū Otago Setters Museum for the first quarter of the 2017/18 financial year were down on the same period of the 2016/17 Financial year, we put this down to exhibition timings, weather and tourist visitor numbers. Toitū remains the Number 1 Dunedin attraction from 110 attractions on Trip Advisor, with continuing high levels of new visitors and repeat visits from the local community.

 


 

17    Visitor numbers to the Dunedin Chinese Garden for the first quarter of the 2017/18 financial year were slightly down on the same period in the 2016/17 financial year, this is due to weather and school holiday timing. The Dunedin Chinese Garden remains at Number 18 of 110 attractions on TripAdvisor.

18    Visitor numbers to Olveston for the quarter ending 30 September, 2017 are to date almost the same as last year (-16 visitors below). The attendance for the month of September is based on an estimate.   New monthly targets for all revenue streams have been set based on average percentage attendance of visitors for each month i.e. 11-16 % of total visitors to Olveston come each month over the high season. As per previous years Olveston follows a standard New Zealand tourist pattern of a high summer and low winter, with growth opportunities in the spring and autumn shoulder seasons. We are noticing the change to the spring shoulder season for the month of September with the first of the coach groups arriving.


 

Major Initiatives

19    Sammy’s - Community engagement on future options for Sammy’s opened on 1 September 2017 and closes on 23 October. To date videos produced and shared via FaceBook have been viewed more than 30,000 times, and have attracted hundreds of comments on future use of the building. Community Development staff hosted an information stand at Otago PolyFest which included information about the Sammy’s consultation, and will host a further stand at Vogel Street Party on 14 October.

20    Art and Creativity in Infrastructure - Council adopted the Art and Creativity in Infrastructure Policy in June 2017.  An artist has been involved with the South Dunedin Community Pop-Up with great success. A prioritised list of projects is currently being developed with infrastructure teams.

21    South Dunedin Future – A series of briefing meetings have been held with the recently recruited lead for South Dunedin Future from Otago Regional Council. She is reviewing the project plan for progressing the project.  The South Dunedin Stakeholder Group met twice during this quarter, with attendance remaining high.  More than 40 organisations (community and government) are engaged through this group.  The group provided positive feedback on the Council’s response to the July 2017 flooding event.

22    South Dunedin Community Pop Up – The South Dunedin Community Pop-Up facility at the Cargill Enterprises property at 199 Hillside Road was officially opened by former councillor Anne Turvey on Friday 8 September 2017.  The Pop Up is open 25 hours per week and provides a community meeting space, as well as service centre and library functions.  It has been well received by the community.

23    Supporting Place Based Community Groups – In July Connect South was contracted to undertake a review of current and potential support by Council for Place Based Community Groups (PBCGs) in Dunedin.  The report has been completed and Community Development staff will provide a report to Council later this year with findings and recommendations for future support.

24    Social Wellbeing Advisory Group – Following internal discussions with Councillors, and consultation with a small group of external stakeholders on options for a governance group for the Council’s Social Wellbeing Strategy, staff are preparing a report to Council for later this year.

25    Housing Report 2018-2038 – Staff scoped a research brief for a housing plan to address housing needs into the future; including emergency, social, affordable and market housing needs.  The plan will also outline strategies to improve warm and well ventilated homes within the city.  The plan research and development will go out to closed tender in October 2017, with the draft plan expected to be submitted to Council in April 2018.

Community

26    In this reporting quarter staff organised two events supporting central city vibrancy. On 13 July, over 8,000 people lined central city streets to welcome home Team NZ and the America’s Cup. Staff coordinated a parade from the Dental School to the Octagon, where crowds were showered with paper confetti.  On 26 August a significant city dressing campaign was coordinated involving more than 200 businesses to celebrate the All Black versus Australia Bledisloe Cup match at Forsyth Barr Stadium.

27    The draft Festivals and Events Plan is scheduled for public consultation in October 2017 following initial stakeholder feedback gathered in the last reporting quarter, and dissemination to internal stakeholder groups.  In December staff will report to Council on the public consultation.

28    The new Arts Capability Fund, with match funding from Council and Otago Community Trust, opened in August and closed on 29 September. More than 20 Dunedin not-for-profit arts and culture organisations have expressed an interest in applying to the fund. A funding panel comprising two Councillors and two members of the Otago Community Trust Board will allocate grants before December 2017.

29    A second Joy and Jeopardy Hui was delivered in July 2017; with Council staff again partnering with Otago Community Trust and the Dunedin Fringe Festival.  The Hui was delivered with Ara Toi funding and focused on sponsorship and budgeting. Participant numbers were lower than expected due to severe weather, with around 30 people attending the event.

30    The Council’s Place Based Advisor continued to support community development initiatives. In the South Dunedin community collaborative action to improve local community gardens began; and a working day in three community gardens was held on 17 September. The Community Advisor working with the Corstorphine community has been supporting the Community Hub to find new premises due to the pending expansion of the Kindergarten Association which it shares space with.  In Mosgiel, the Community Advisor has been working with the Mosgiel Resource Group exploring options for a local community-led development model; either through a hub or community worker.

31    Connect South completed its review Supporting Place Based Groups, which Community Development staff had contracted it to complete following annual plan submissions from Place Based groups in the city, requesting additional support and resourcing.  A report, with the review findings and staff recommendations, has been provided to the Community and Culture Committee for consideration.

32    The Dunedin Youth Council (DYC) had a change of Chair, elected by its members. The DYC also ran a recruitment process for five new members; with two resignations and three representatives finishing their two year term.  DYC members engaged directly with schools, attending assemblies to promote DYC membership, and were supported by the Dunedin Secondary Schools Partnership to connect with schools.

33    DYC members visited the Clutha District Youth Council to develop links, and look at how another youth council operated. Members provided direct feedback to Otago Regional Council on public transport. The DYC also coordinated a political youth debate attracting almost 100 people. Representatives from four political parties participated in the debate, focused on youth issues.

34    The New Zealand Masters Games secured a naming partnership with the Otago Community Trust for the 2018 event. The Games were launched and entries opened in August. There are 349 registrations as at 18 September, this is 46 ahead of the 2016 event at the same time. The Games team is currently focused on promotion of the event.

35    In September Community Development grant applications were moved to an online-only process.  Previously applications had been made both online and in hard copy.  The move to online only aligns with other the city’s other major community funders (Department of Internal Affairs and Otago Community Trust).  Staff have been supporting groups through this process, but it is new and has posed challenges for some applicants.


 

Cultural Facilities

36    Dunedin Public Libraries – Key activities undertaken by the Dunedin Public Libraries during the quarter include Kiwi cartoonist workshops, the inaugural Ink Spots Children’s Day, National Poetry Day, and Dr Yoram Barak’s Brain Health series of talks. The South Dunedin Community Pop-Up Library and Service Centre facility has opened and the new library website has been launched.

37    Dunedin Public Art Gallery - Significant exhibitions launched during the period included: Rooms only found in the home by Marie Shannon, By Purchase Gift or Bequest, a showcase of recent acquisitions to the DPAG art collection, Loveliness Extreme and Somewhere Up Country: Landscapes From the Collection – also drawn from the Galleries art holdings, and Jealous Saboteurs – a touring exhibition from City Gallery in Wellington by the expatriate New Zealand sculptor Francis Uprichard.

38    Toitū Otago Settlers Museum – Key activities for this period included the launch of “Sketched in Stone” Lithographic Printing in Dunedin exhibition and “The Belgians Have Not Forgotten” travelling exhibition. School holidays have also been a very busy time with the annual Cadbury Chocolate Festival Magic Shows being held. The Museum remains the top visitor attraction in Dunedin on TripAdvisor.

39    Dunedin Chinese Garden – Key activities during this period included school holidays, holidays, traditionally times of high visitation. Preparation for the Moon Festival being held on the 1st of October and the New Zealand Gardens Trust assessment takes place late October.

40    Dunedin Olveston Historic Home - The core group of staff have spent the winter updating education offerings, reviewing all marketing materials, undertaking stock take and ordering of merchandise.  The cleaning of the House and audit of the collection is almost completed.  Planning is well underway for a busy season to come.   Staff are expecting a similar number of coach tours with most suppliers working to increase tourist numbers over the shoulder season.   There is a planned increase of cruise ships docking of which Olveston expects to benefit from the increased numbers.    Olveston received a 2017 “Certificate of Excellence” from Trip Advisor and remains at number four of Top Things to Do in Dunedin.

OPTIONS

41    As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

42    A further update report will be provided after the conclusion of the next quarter. The South Dunedin Pop-up and work with stakeholders will be a key focus. The Pop-up is proposed to be developed as a pilot project for the arts and creativity in infrastructure approach, involving local creative people working with the project team from the early stages.

 

Signatories

Author:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Community and Culture portfolio of activities support the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

As an update report, there are no specific implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

As an update report, there are no specific implications for sustainability.

Financial considerations

As this is an administrative report, there are no financial considerations.

Significance

This update report is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

As this is an update report, no external engagement has been undertaken.

Engagement - internal

As this is an update report, no internal engagement has been undertaken.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest identified in respect to this report.

Community Boards

The updates in this report do not relate specifically to Community Boards but are likely to be of general interest to them.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

Ara Toi and City of Literature Update - January - June 2017

Department: Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1.     The purpose of the report is to provide an update to Council on the activities and achievements of Ara Toi and the City of Literature for the period from January to June 2017.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Ara Toi and City of Literature Update January to June 2017.

 

 

BACKGROUND

2.     Ara Toi Otepoti: Our Creative Future: Dunedin’s Arts and Culture Strategy was adopted by Council in May 2015, with a total of $245,000 provided in the 2016/17 Annual Plan for implementation. Ara Toi Otepoti is one of the eight key strategies that together make up the city’s Strategic Framework. Ara Toi has strong connections with the 2013-23 Economic Development and Social Wellbeing Strategies.

3.     Ara Toi was developed in partnership with the community arts collective Transforming Dunedin and included extensive community consultation.

4.     Ara Toi provides a framework and a direction for the development of arts and culture within Dunedin to realise the vision that ‘Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities with arts and culture at its core’.

5.     The four key strategic themes of Ara Toi are Identity Pride, Creative Economy, Access and Inclusion, and Inspired Connections. These themes collectively provide a focus for Dunedin to celebrate its creativity, to support the city’s creative sector, to enhance Dunedin’s place as a compelling destination, to include the whole community in creative activity and to connect with creative communities across New Zealand and internationally. An overview of the strategic themes comprising Ara Toi is included as Attachment A.

DISCUSSION

6.     The work programmes for Ara Toi and the City of Literature during 2016/17 build on the foundations laid in 2015/16. A detailed list of activities and achievements during the period January to June 2017 is presented in Attachment B.

7.     Key areas of focus for Ara Toi during the period January to June 2017 have been the development and public consultation on the Public Art Framework; development and Council endorsement of the Art and Creativity in Infrastructure policy; continued installations by the Dunedin Urban Dream Brokerage; ongoing support for the Bring it Home and Dunedin Boosted Ambassador programmes; continuation of the Joy and Jeopardy Funding Hui; coordination of the China Film Festival in Dunedin and the Anything Can Happen exhibition of Dunedin art and fashion in Shanghai.

8.     The City of Literature designation and the City of Literature activities are aligned with and exemplify the Ara Toi strategic themes of Inspired Connections (Networked Winner, Ambitious Partner) and Creative Economy (Promote and Profile, World Class Player).

9.     Council approved a budget of $135,000 in the 2016/17 Annual Plan for the implementation of the City of Literature designation.

10.   Key areas of focus for the City of Literature during the period January to June 2017 have been collaboration with the Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival and Fringe Festival; development and release of Savoir Faire, a digital cookbook; providing a stand at the Bologna Children’s Book Festival in April 2017; collaboration with the University of Otago and planning for the Creative Cities Southern Hui to be held from 29 November to 2 December 2017, with funding support from the New Zealand National Commission for UNESCO.

OPTIONS

11.   There are no options as the report is for information only.

NEXT STEPS

12.   A detailed work plan for the implementation of Ara Toi Otepoti was developed by staff and endorsed by the Creative Dunedin Partnership. The work plan aligned activities undertaken during 2016/17 with Ara Toi strategic themes and explored opportunities to strengthen and develop local and national partnerships.

13.   The 2016/17 work plan for Ara Toi will provide the basis of the work plan for 2017/18, along with the development of a strategic plan for arts and culture in Dunedin. The development of this plan will be informed by the Ara Toi hui to be held on 2 December 2017 as part of the overall programme for the Creative Cities Southern Hui.

14.   A strategic plan for the Dunedin City of Literature has been under development in 2016/17 and will be consulted with key stakeholders during 2017/18.

 

Signatories

Author:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Ara Toi Otepoti: Key Strategic Themes

55

b

Ara Toi Otepoti and City of Literature: Key Activities and Achievements

56

 

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Ara Toi

Ara Toi is one of the eight key strategies in the strategic framework, and works in synergy with the other city strategies. The initial arts and culture actions can be expected to drive economic success and contribute to better social outcomes for the city.

 

City of Literature

The City of Literature supports activities that contribute to the four themes of Ara Toi and also supports other key strategies including the Social Wellbeing Strategy in promoting ‘Connected People’ and “Vibrant and Cohesive Communities’; the Economic Development Strategy by providing activities that support ‘Business vitality’, ‘Alliances for innovation’, ‘Linkages beyond our borders’ and ‘A compelling destination’.

Māori Impact Statement

Ara Toi

Ngai Tahu has been closely linked to the development of Ara Toi. Kai Tahu views will be represented during implementation through membership of the Creative Dunedin Partnership.

City of Literature

The fundamental contribution of tangata whenua to the culture of Dunedin has been recognised in the submission for Dunedin to be designated as a UNESCO City of Literature.

Sustainability

Ara Toi

The implementation of Ara Toi supports more sustainable local economic development.

 

City of Literature

The City of Literature is expected to contribute to increased cultural tourism and more sustainable local economic activity

LTP/ Annual Plan/ Financial Strategy/ Infrastructure Strategy

The 2016/17 Annual Plan included funding for Ara Toi ($245,000) and the City of Literature ($135,000)

Financial considerations

This report is for information only and there are no financial implications

Significance

The information in this report has been assessed under the Council's Significance and Engagement policy as being of low significance.

Engagement - external

There has been no external engagement in the development of this report. The activities undertaken in the implementation of Ara Toi and the City of Literature have involved engagement with a broad range of external stakeholders and partners.

Engagement – internal

Council staff in the Enterprise Dunedin Group, Community and Planning Group and the Arts and Culture Group have provided input for this report.

Risks: Legal/ Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified legal or health and safety risks related to the information in this report.

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest have been identified regarding the information in this report.

Community Boards

Community Boards will be involved where Ara Toi and City of Literature projects are implemented in their area.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

Public Art Framework 2017-22

Department: Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report presents the results of the public and People’s Panel surveys gauging the community’s views on Public Art Framework 2017-22, the blueprint for a new public art programme in Dunedin.

2      The results from the two surveys (attached) were predominantly supportive of the vision and the proposed action plan to deliver a new programme of public art.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves and adopts the Public Art Framework 2017-22 without amendment.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Community and Culture Committee approved the Public Art Framework 2017-22 for consultation on 11 April 2017.

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Mayor Dave Cull): That the Committee:

 

a)   Approves in house commissioning of public art as the preferred model for Council funded public art activity.

b)   Notes that Public Art Framework 2017-22 has been updated so that in-house commission is the preferred model for Council funded public art activity.

c)   Approves the Public Art Framework 2017-22 engagement process.

Motion Carried (COM/2017/009)

4      Public consultation opened on the Public Art Framework 2017-22 (the Framework) on Monday 3 June and closed on Friday 11 August 2017.

5      In addition, a People’s Panel survey on the Framework was conducted from Thursday 13 July to Friday 28 July 2017.

DISCUSSION

Public Survey Results

6      There were 112 responses to the public survey.

7      Responses to the public survey were predominantly supportive, with over three quarters of respondents agreeing or strongly agreeing with the vision and actions proposed in the Framework.

8      A large majority of respondents (86%) agreed or strongly agreed with the vision for public art outlined in the Framework.

9      A large majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the five actions proposed to develop and deliver public art projects.

10    The individual results for each action are as follows:

·      A large majority (80%) agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to implement a new commissioning model.

·      A large majority (82%) agreed to or strongly agreed with the proposal to maximise opportunity to link public art activities within the city’s decision making activities.

·      Over three quarters (77%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to implement public art labs to generate and test ideas for public art.

·      Over three quarters (77%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to encourage temporary public art works.

·      A large majority of respondents (87%) agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to develop a plan to profile and promote the public art programme.

·      Comments were wide ranging and clustered in the following themes – full support of the framework, suggestions for future public art works, as well as the support for the inclusion of Manawhenua, local artists and youth in the process.

People’s Panel

11    There were 132 responses to the People’s Panel survey.

12    Responses to the People’s Panel survey were also supportive of the vision and actions proposed in the Framework.

13    A large majority of respondents (84%) agreed or strongly agreed with the vision for the Framework.

14    The individual results for each action are as follows:

·      Almost two thirds (63%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to implement a new commissioning model.

·      Almost three quarters (71%) agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to maximise opportunity to link public art activities within the city’s decision making activities.

·      Over three quarters (76%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to implement public art labs to generate and test ideas for public art.

·      Over three quarters (80%) of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the proposal to encourage temporary public art works.

·      A large majority of respondents (82%) agreed with the proposal to develop a plan to profile and promote the public art programme.

·      Comments were diverse and ranged from being fully supportive of the Framework and a new public art programme, to questioning the use of public funds for a public art programme.

OPTIONS

15    Not applicable.

 NEXT STEPS

16    If the recommendation to adopt the Framework is approved, Council staff can begin the process to implement the actions in the Public Art Framework.

 

Signatories

Author:

Cam McCracken - Dunedin Public Art Gallery Director

Authoriser:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Draft Public Art Framework Public Survey Report

69

b

Draft Public Art Framework People's Panel Survey Report

80

c

Draft Public Art Framework

91

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The information provided in this report supports the DCC strategic framework in various ways. Public art adds to the Social Wellbeing Strategy by promoting vibrant and cohesive communities, it contributes to the Economic Development strategy by supporting alliances for innovation and the Arts and Culture Strategy by contributing to Dunedin’s identity and pride and providing accessible and inclusive experiences.

Māori Impact Statement

Both local runaka are represented on the Creative Dunedin Partnership, which has been engaged during the development of the Framework. Manawhenua would be involved in consultation, where appropriate, with regard to any specific public art works.

Sustainability

The report supports sustainability by considering the development of public art from commissioning to installation to longer term maintenance and asset management.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Any funding contribution by Council towards public art would be considered as part of future Annual and or Long Term Planning processes. Public Art Commissions would also be considered as part of the infrastructure strategy.

Financial considerations

Council will need to consider any on-going funding of the public art programme as part of the future Annual and Long Term Plans.

Significance

The matters raised in this report are considered low significance in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. However there is a significant community interest in public art.

Engagement – external

This report details the public engagement process for a new Public Art Framework and includes detailed information derived from public and People’s Panel surveys.

Engagement - internal

There has been internal engagement with Events and Community Development, Enterprise Dunedin, the Arts and Culture Group, Parks and Recreation, Transport and Water and Waste regarding this report. While there are differing views, there is majority support for the recommended direction.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified legal or health and safety risks related to this report.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Each Community Board has had a presentation of the Draft Public Art Framework as part of the community engagement process.

 

In future, when the public art programme has been formulated and specific sites and or projects have been identified, the relevant Community Board(s) will be further engaged at that time.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

New Zealand Masters Games Operational and Financial Status

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1          The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust’s Statement of Intent and Trust Deed requires the Trust to report to Council in October prior to the biennial Masters Games being run in February 2018. The purpose of the report is to provide an update on the operational and financial status of the Masters Games.

2          The current financial status of the 2018 New Zealand Masters Games is on track with 88.88% of budgeted grant and sponsorship revenue confirmed. Registrations have been open since 17 August 2017 and are currently tracking slightly ahead of those received at the same time of year for the 2016 Games.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the New Zealand Masters Games operational and financial status as outlined within the report.

b)     Notes the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust holds retained income of $102,695 from previous events.

c)     Approves the 2018 New Zealand Masters Games proceeding.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The biennial Dunedin Masters Games is the largest regularly occurring event in Dunedin. The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust (the Trust) ensures that management of the Games reflects the Council’s Festivals and Events Strategy in relation to attracting visitors, visitor nights and visitor expenditure.

4      The Games meet the Council’s goals relating to recreational activity and participation. The Games attract repeat visitors to Dunedin, and participant feedback shows high levels of satisfaction with the event and their stay in Dunedin.

5      The Dunedin City Council Annual Plan funding for the Masters Games has provided grant payments to the Trust of $77,900 and $101,800 for 2016/17 and 2017/18 respectively. The annual grant covers the staff and allocated overhead costs for the Games Manager who is an employee of the Dunedin City Council.

6      The Dunedin City Council has delegated the management and coordination of the biennial Dunedin Games, to the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust. Because the Trust is dependent on funding from sources external to the Council for the successful financial management of the Games, much of its operational activity is focused on securing funding, as well as attracting competitors who contribute to revenue through their registration fee.

7      The New Zealand Masters Games is owned by New Zealand Masters Games Limited, and the Dunedin City Council is one of two franchisees – the other being the Whanganui Event Trust which is currently in hiatus with the Whanganui District Council considering options to take over this franchise.

8      New Zealand Masters Games Limited guarantees franchise rights for the biennial New Zealand Masters Games in Dunedin until the completion of the 2036 New Zealand Masters Games. In addition the franchise agreement guarantees a one third membership to the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust on the New Zealand Masters Games Limited Board.

DISCUSSION

9      The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust Board was responsible for approving the 2018 Masters Games Budget at the beginning of 2016/17. Monthly Board meetings have been held to monitor and closely manage the expenditure against the budget. The level of expenditure is directly related to revenue sourced from grants, sponsorship and registration fees. The Trust is charged with the responsibility for ensuring that, at its completion, the Games will achieve a surplus or break even result.

10    Due to the biennial nature of the Masters Games event, the main revenue stream from Games registration begins in August (prior to the February Games). The Trust Deed and Statement of Intent state that the Trust is required to report to the Council in October prior to the Masters Games being run; confirming whether it has achieved 85% of the biennial Masters Games budgeted grants and sponsorship revenue. If the Board has been unsuccessful in achieving 85% of the Games grants and sponsorship funding, by that time, the Trust will:

·      Revise the Games budget to reduce expenditure to achieve a break even result and/or request the Dunedin City Council to underwrite the Games; or

·      Gain approval from the Council for it to underwrite the amount of the anticipated loss; or

·      Agree to cancel the Games.

11    The following is an update of funding activity as at 18 September 2017, five months out from the February 2018 event.

12    Grants and Sponsorship – The approved budget from Sponsorship is $244,700, fourteen percent over the event target.  Funding has been received from the following sources: The Otago Community Trust $100,000 and Dunedin City Council $179,700.

Sponsorship

Income

Budget

Confirmed

Dunedin City Council

179,700

179,700

Otago Community Trust

50,000

100,000

Otago University

15,000

 

Total

244,700

279,700

 

13    The projected budget forecast for revenue from Gaming Trusts is $92,500 and to date $20,000 (21.62%) has been secured. Further funding applications to the value of $44,600 have been completed. The current availability of funding from Gaming Trusts has been oversubscribed by community and sporting groups and securing funds has proven difficult.  However, the Trust continues to make applications.

Grants

Income

Budget

Confirmed

Bendigo Valley Sports & Charity

16,500

 

Callis Charitable Trust

5,000

 

Lion Foundation

15,000

10,000

NZ Community Trust

30,000

10,000

NZ Racing Board

5,000

 

Southern Victorian

1,000

 

The Southern Trust

20,000

 

Total

92,500

20,000

 

14    The combination of grant and sponsorship revenue secured to date is $299,700 which represents 88.89% of the target Games budget of $337,200. The Games Trust continues to apply for funding to achieve targets.

15    The Trust is continually monitoring expenses to ensure they do not exceed the budget.

16    Registration Fees – After significant discussion and modelling the Trust set the 2018 registration fees at the same level as the 2016 event. The following fees were approved by the Trust:

·      Early Bird                $65.00

·      Standard                $95.00

·      Late                              $125.00

·      Supporter                       $45.00

17    The projected budget forecast for revenue from registrations is $287,250 which is split into four categories; Early Bird, $184,000 (closing 30 November 2017), Standard, $54,000 (closing 8 January 2018), Late, $42,500 (close off dependant on sport), and Supporter, $8,750 (open until the completion of the Games).

18    The registration fees are an ‘at risk’ component of the budget, therefore the budget has been set based on participant numbers of 4,500. As at 18 September there are 345 participant entries which are tracking 41 ahead of the same time in the lead up to the 2016 Games.

19    The Trust is confident that the budget targets will be met and is not seeking an underwrite from the Dunedin City Council. Currently the Games are continuing to seek funding and anticipate a surplus or break even result due to careful planning and organisation of the event.

OPTIONS Option One – Recommended Option 20    The 2018 New Zealand Masters Games proceeding and the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust continues to monitor revenue and expenses to ensure the event does not exceed its budget.

Advantages

·           Positive economic impact to Dunedin City.

·           Growth in funding and membership for participating sporting organisations.

·           Contributes positively to the health and wellbeing of participating residents.

Disadvantages

·           The Council could be called upon to underwrite the Dunedin Masters Games. However the risk is minimal as fundraising is on target.

Option Two

21    The Committee does not approve proceeding with the 2018 New Zealand Masters Games and instructs the Trust to cancel the Games.

Advantages

·           The Council will save on grant funding.

Disadvantages

·           Loss of potential income and wider economic benefit to the city.

·           Disadvantages to business and sporting codes as financial and other commitments have been made, and benefits will not be realised.

·           The Council has already incurred costs relating to the event which cannot be recovered.

NEXT STEPS

22    Following approval by Council to proceed, the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust continues its planning and organisation of the biennial Dunedin Masters Games as delegated by the Dunedin City Council.

 

Signatories

Author:

Vicki  Kestila  - Master Games Manager

Authoriser:

Joy Gunn - Manager Events and Community Development

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.


 

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The New Zealand Masters Games contribute to three of the Council’s defined strategies and towards the vision Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities. The Games reflect the Council’s Festivals and Events Strategy in relation to attracting visitors, visitor nights and visitor expenditure. The Games also meet the Council’s goals relating to recreational activity and participation.

Māori Impact Statement

There is no specific impact. The Games are open to Maori and non-Maori entrants, encouraging opportunities for all residents and visitors to participate in sport and recreation.

Sustainability

The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust has the franchise rights to host the biennial New Zealand Masters Games until the end of 2036.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

The Dunedin City Council guarantees an underwrite of the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games should it be required. The Trust is not anticipating the DCC would need to underwrite these Games.

Significance

Significance of the proposal for the New Zealand Masters Games to proceed is assessed as low in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. However it is noted that there is a high level of community participation in the event, and beneficial economic impact to the city.

Engagement – external

In the on-going planning of the New Zealand Masters Games the Games Manager regularly engages with; funders, suppliers, sporting organisations, Sporting Associations, service providers, volunteers, participants and other Masters Games organisers.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement on the decisions set out in this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

The New Zealand Masters Games implement its own Health and Safety policy and process in line with current legislation. If the Community and Culture Committee decide not to proceed with the Games, there is an economic risk to the city’s tourism industry.  In addition financial and other commitments have already been made.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

 

Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust CCO Exemption

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust seeks a continuation of exemption status from being a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) in accordance with the s7(3) Local Government Act 2002. This exemption has been made by Council in the past because the Trust is a small organisation that is of charitable intent.

2      On 24 November 2014 the Council approved the Trust’s continued exemption from being a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) in accordance with s7(3) Local Government Act 2002.  According to legislation this exemption needs to be reviewed not more than three years following the last review and the Council to approve the continuation of the exemption. 

3      It is considered that the cost to the Council and community of having to formally re-establish the Trust as a CCO outweigh any benefits to the status quo, particularly as the Trust’s Deed requires that it meet accountability standards as if it were a CCO.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Approves the exemption of the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust from the requirements of being a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) in accordance with s7(3) Local Government Act 2002. 

 

background

4      Section 7 of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA) enables an organisation to be exempted CCO status if it is a small organisation and the Council has taken into account:

a)     The nature and scope of the activities provided by the Trust; and

b)     The costs and benefits, if the exemption is granted, to the Dunedin City Council, the Trust and the community.

5      The LGA decision making provisions will apply when Council considers whether to exempt the Trust.  The cost benefit analysis required at section 7, to exempt an organisation, is similar but in addition to the requirements on local authorities in relation to the decision making process at section 77 of the Act.  As the exemption decision is not a  significant decision, Council is required to consider known community views and any impact on community outcomes in addition to the cost benefit considerations of section 7.

DISCUSSION

6      When the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust was set up it was not intended that the Trust become a CCO of the Council.  The requirements relating to exemption were overlooked at that time and no resolution exempting the Trust was passed. An exemption was sought and approved by Council on 10 August 2011, based on the factors outlined below:

a)     Small organisation - The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust currently comprises seven Board members.  No staff are employed by the Trust. The Dunedin City Council employs the Games Manager and additional staff.  The Games has a biennial budget of $700,000.

b)     Activities of the Trust - The Trust organises, coordinates, markets, manages and successfully stages on a biennial basis the Dunedin Masters Games and does so within an agreed revenue and expenditure budget. The Trust was established with the intent that it be charitable, and is registered as a Charitable Trust.

The Trust’s purposes shall be carried out in Dunedin, or to the benefit of the people of Dunedin. The Trustees may authorise the Trust to carry out activities outside Dunedin to promote the Games, but only if they believe that such activities will be for the ultimate benefit of the Dunedin Games.

The Trust works with, and has a successful relationship with over 60 community sporting agencies within the Dunedin region.

c)     Community views - Views expressed by the community about the Trust are generally positive.  Funders have stated on a number of occasions that they would rather support the Trust financially to run the Games than see the money coming to the Council for the event. Many community funding agencies are now funding only Trusts with charitable status.

d)     Costs and benefits - There are no identified costs to the community or any impact on community outcomes in exempting the Trust.  The key benefit in exempting the Trust is that there are no costs to change the Trust’s status.

7      The LGA establishes many financial reporting requirements for a CCO at Part 5 and schedule 8.  Theoretically these requirements no longer apply if the Trust remains exempt.  These are:

a)     Statement of Intent and subsequent consistent decision making (ss60, 64, 65(2), 58, 59 (1)(a) and schedule 8);

b)     Contract for services between the Trust and Council (s61);

c)     Half yearly reporting (s66); and

d)     Annual report and audited financial statements (ss67-69).

8      The Trust Deed now specifically refers to the need to continue to meet these financial reporting requirements of a CCO, irrespective of whether the MGT is a CCO.

9      If the Trust is exempt from CCO status it will still be a Council organisation.  The definition of Council organisation means an organisation where the Council can appoint one of more of the directors/trustees.  CCOs can be considered a subset of types of Council organisations.  There is no exemption from being a Council organisation.  The provisions in Part five that will still apply to the Trust as a council organisation are:

a)     Directors/trustees must be appointed consistent with Council’s policy for objective and transparent appointment and remuneration and have the appropriate skill set for guiding the organisation (s57);

b)     Regular performance monitoring by Council of the organisation’s objectives and Council’s aims (s65(1);

c)     As a Public Entity for the purposes of the Public Audit Act (2001) and it requires audit by the Office of the Auditor General.

OPTIONS

Option One – Recommended Option

10    The Council approves the exemption of the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust from the requirements of being a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) in accordance with s7(3) Local Government Act 2002.

Advantages

·           The Trust will comply with the CCO and exempted CCO sections of the LGA.

·           There are no identified costs to the community.

Disadvantages

·           The Trust is not required to produce an audited Statement of Service Performance.  However, it meets a similar audit standard as a CCO would, and   would continue to have an annual Audit undertaken.  

Option Two

11    The Council does not approve the exemption of the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust from the requirements of being a Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) in accordance with s7(3) Local Government Act 2002.

Advantages

·           A Statement of Service Performance would be produced as part of the Annual Report.

Disadvantages

·           There could be an increase in annual audit costs.

·           Timing of auditing requirements would adversely impact operational activities of the Trust during the biennial Games year as the Games launch occurs in mid-August. Under Section 67 of the Local Government Act, “Within 3 months after the end of each financial year, the board of a council controlled organisation must deliver to the shareholders, and make available to the public, a report on the organisation’s operations during that year.”

NEXT STEPS

12    The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust will continue its planning and organisation of the biennial Dunedin Masters Games as delegated by the Dunedin City Council, and will continue to meet the reporting requirements as set out in the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Signatories

Author:

Vicki  Kestila  - Master Games Manager

Authoriser:

Joy Gunn - Manager Events and Community Development

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing a regulatory function and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The New Zealand Masters Games contribute to three of the Councils defined strategies and towards the vision Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities. The Games reflect the Council’s Festivals and Events Strategy in relation to attracting visitors, visitor nights and visitor expenditure. The Games also meet the Council’s goals relating to recreational activity and participation.

Māori Impact Statement

There is no impact. The Games are open to Maori and non-Maori entrants, encouraging opportunities for all to participate in sport and recreation.

Sustainability

The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust has the franchise rights to host the biennial New Zealand Masters Games until the end of 2036.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications should the exemption be approved, however Annual Audit costs for the Trust could increase if it is not approved.

Significance

The significance of the proposal to exempt the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust from the requirements of being a Council Controlled Organisation is assessed as low in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

Engagement – external

Clarification on requirements of the LGA has been discussed with the Auditor.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement on the decisions set out in this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

If the exemption is not approved the Trust will be Trust will not be in compliance with the CCO and exempted CCO sections of the LGA

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

            


Community and Culture Committee

17 October 2017

 

 

Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

 

That the Community and Culture Committee:

 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, exclude the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

 

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Appointment of Trustees on the Dunedin (new Zealand) Masters Games Trust

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.