Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                             Monday 16 October 2017

Time:                            1.00 pm

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers,
The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Kate Wilson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Jim O'Malley

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Cr Rachel Elder

Cr Christine Garey

 

Cr Doug Hall

Cr Aaron Hawkins

 

Cr Marie Laufiso

Cr Mike Lord

 

Cr Damian Newell

Cr Chris Staynes

 

Cr Conrad Stedman

Cr Lee Vandervis

 

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

 

Senior Officer                               Ruth Stokes, General Manager Infrastructure and Networks

 

Governance Support Officer      Wendy Collard

 

 

 

Wendy Collard

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Wendy.Collard@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Public Forum                                                                                             4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5      

Part A Reports (Committee  has power to decide these matters)

5          Transport Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 30 September 2017                  15

6        Waste and Environmental Solutions Activity Report for the Quarter Ending 30 September 2017                                                                                      24

7        3 Waters Activity Report for the Quarter Ending 30 September 2017                  41

8        Water Safety Plans - Framework, Development and Implementation                  50

9        Parks and Recreation Activity Report for Quarter Ending 30 September 2017       64

10      Property Services Activity Report for the Quarter Ending 30 September 2017      73

11      Items for consideration by the Chair                                                            79             

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

 

1     Public Forum

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.

 

That the Committee:

 

             Confirms the agenda with the following alteration:

 

-        In regard to Standing Order 2.1, Option C be adopted in relation to moving and seconding and speaking to amendments.

 

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Members' Register of Interest

7

  



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Part A Reports

 

Transport Activity Report for the Quarter Ended 30 September 2017

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Committee on Transport operations, maintenance, and capital works, including contracted out services.

2      Highlights for the quarter include:

a)     Response to the July rain event from Council and contracting staff with resources prioritised and effectively coordinated.

b)     The July rain event has resulted in significant costs to address works in relation to the initial response and subsequent recovery works largely involving land stabilisation, and bridge and drainage repairs caused by slips, scouring, and falling debris. A programme of work is being developed in consultation with NZTA.

c)     100% of the Minor Improvement budget for the 2017/18 year has now been committed.

d)     approximately 80% of the 2017/18 capital renewal programme has been committed.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Transport Activity Report for the Quarter ended 30 September 2017.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Transport activity provides the planning, construction, maintenance, and upgrading of the transport network. The network includes:

·      Roads

·      Cycle ways

·      Footpaths

·      Bridges and retaining walls

·      Street lighting

·      Traffic signals

·      Road marking.

4      The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), the national road funding authority, provides a financial assistance subsidy for works that meet agreed criteria via the National Land Transport Programme.

DISCUSSION

Contract Management

5      The Transport Maintenance Contract was tendered in early 2016 and awarded to Downer on 1 July 2016 for three years valued at $45 million.

6      During the first year of the contract staff have worked with Downer in developing a relevant, measurable, and robust performance framework focusing on key areas as follows:

a)     Service Delivery - Adherence to programme, specification, and budget

b)     Value for Money – Delivering services efficiently

c)     Customer Service – Improved customer experience across all aspects of the contract

d)     Safety – Strict adherence to health and safety requirements and pro-active management of health and safety issues.

7      Note that due to the timing of this report not all September results are available.

Service Delivery

8      Performance is measured by network audit outcomes, adherence to programme delivery, and compliance with asset data and reporting requirements.

9      The results in this area have been acceptable. The work required throughout, and following, the July rain event, has put pressure on contracting resources and the contractor's ability to meet "business as usual" programmed works.

10    26% of the planned programme was completed in August. Improvements will be required in the coming months to address the recovery, service request, and routine programmed works.

11    997 mud tanks have been cleaned this financial year to date to 30 September 2017. Random mud tank audits are conducted each month focusing on vulnerable areas of the network. 94% of Mud tanks audited met contract specification requirements, versus the target of 95%. This is an improvement on the August result.

12    The number of mud tanks forecast to be cleaned in the financial year is less than last year due to there being only one truck on the network. Following the full clean of all tanks last year it is expected that the allocated resource will be sufficient to maintain the mud tank network to a high standard.

13    There remains a high level of confidence that the mud tank network is being maintained to a high standard and will perform as expected during a rain event. This is largely due to the high degree of managerial oversight through a robust auditing regime that provides timely visibility of performance issues that are resolved as soon as possible.

Value for Money

14    Performance is measured by inspection audits for work completed and the quality of claims.

15    The quality of completed works will continue to be monitored to ensure compliance with contract specifications. Payment is withheld for any works that do not meet the required standards. Of the audited jobs presented in the August 2017 claim 25% were identified as not obtaining the appropriate specification and payment was withheld.

16    Robust contract monitoring processes are in place to ensure payment is only being made when the work is completed to an acceptable standard and the appropriate claim has been submitted to DCC. Staff continue to work with contractors to ensure the appropriate specifications are understood and delivered on consistently.

Customer Service

17    Performance is measured by Customer Service Agency (CSA) response times and monitoring back log requests.

18    96% of CSA requests were completed on time in September, versus the targeted 95%. This is an improvement month on month over the quarter. The largest volume of service requests pertained to environmental clean-ups and drainage issues primarily as a result of the July rain event which created a backlog of service dispatches. These are being addressed by the contractor.

Safety

19    Performance is measured through Traffic Management Planning (TMP) audits, Health and Safety audit results, and valid complaints from the community.

20    Results in this area have been mixed with exceptional performance for July and September, and an unsatisfactory performance for August.

21    Fourteen TMP audits were undertaken on maintenance contractor sites in August, of these, two incidents were deemed dangerous due to inadequate speed limit signage and pedestrian access. In the latter cases, the contractor was requested to rectify issues of non-conformance immediately or the site was closed down.

22    Council has engaged the services of an independent Health and Safety adviser who is undertaking monthly health and safety site inspections. These are conducted in collaboration with Council and Downer staff. 

23    The process of health and safety auditing is also designed to be a collective learning experience for the operational staff involved by raising awareness and knowledge of potential health and safety risks and appropriate process to mitigate.

Major initiatives

24    Peninsula Connection Safety Improvement Project – The second public open day for the Peninsula Connection was held on 26 July. This workshop presented the detailed design to the public. Around 100 people attended over four hours. Feedback was generally positive with specific comments received on the location of steps, pull over areas and the order of works.

25    The order of construction for the project is still to be confirmed through the tender process. It is anticipated that construction will commence at the city end of the route, due to higher volumes of traffic and minimising truck movements.

26    The tender process is currently underway and it is expected that a contract will be awarded in late November. The successful contractor will begin mobilising prior to Christmas with physical works to commence in the new year.

27    Urban Cycleway Programme – A consultation process was completed for the Urban Cycleway programme. This programme includes a number of routes to provide better connections around the harbour and from the harbour to the city. Contracts for the physical works are expected to be let prior to Christmas with work scheduled to be completed by the middle of 2018.

28    Transport Model – The new traffic model is on track to be delivered by the end of the calendar year. This will assist in developing future projects such as the Central City Plan. The model includes a micro-simulation of the central city to assist with detailed traffic modelling.

29    Capital Renewals 2016/17 – The 2017/18 capital renewal programme has recently commenced. This year 70km of road will be resealed, 4km of footpaths and 4km of kerbing will be renewed. In addition a package of bridge renewals will be completed. The total budget for renewals is $12,278,900. Approximately 80% of this renewal work has now been awarded.

30    LED Street Light Installation – Strategic Lighting Partners Ltd have been engaged to produce the business case for the LED renewal. It is anticipated that the business case will be submitted to NZTA in early November to obtain funding approval.

31    Staff are engaging a project manager to oversee the project through to completion. Procurement of the luminaires, central management system and installation contract is expected to be complete by January 2018. The installation will commence as soon as possible after this.

32    Minor improvement projects – A number of improvement projects have already been completed in 2017/18. Projects include:

·      Intersection upgrades at St Clair and Caversham

·      Safety barrier installation on the Otago Peninsula

·      Installation of speed calming measures in the tertiary precinct

·      Smart parking signs have been installed as a trial outside two popular tourist attractions. This allows parks to be set aside for tour bus parking on cruise ship days and returned to public parking at other times. Avoiding the need for temporary traffic management provides Council flexibility in managing parking at popular locations.

33    Additional safety projects to be completed in the 2017/18 year include:

·      Baldwin Street safety improvements (signs)

·      Wharf Street / Roberts Street intersection upgrade

·      Town belt traverse pedestrian safety improvements

·      Installation of a package of roundabouts at the Green Island / Fairfield motorway interchange in conjunction with NZTA

·      Footpath improvements in Brighton

·      A further package of crossing improvements to improve accessibility on the network.

·      Additional school safety work including improvements relating to Central City Schools cluster

OPTIONS

34    As an update report there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

35    Areas of focus for the next quarter will be:

·           Address the backlog of maintenance and renewal works associated with the July rain event.

·           On-going work with Downer to improve performance in year two of the contract.

·           Awarding of the physical works contract for the Peninsula Connection project.

·           Await and address feedback following the first draft of the Transport Asset Management Plan to support NZTA's next three year funding round.

·           Progress design and procurement for the Urban Cycleway work package.

·           Complete the Council submission to the 2018/19 to 2021/22 Regional Land Transport Plan.

 

Signatories

Author:

Merrin McCrory - Asset and Commercial Manager, Transport

Authoriser:

Stacey Hitchcock - Business Administrator Transport

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Peninsula Connection Cross Sections

23

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Integrated Transport Strategy supports the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

No known impacts.

Sustainability

The Integrated Transport Strategy supports sustainable outcomes.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The Integrated Transport Strategy is included in the long term plan.

Financial considerations

No financial implications.

Significance

This is considered to be of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

No external engagement.

Engagement - internal

No internal engagement.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

No risks.

Conflict of Interest

No conflict of interest.

Community Boards

Not applicable.

 

 


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Waste and Environmental Solutions Activity Report for the Quarter Ending 30 September 2017

Department: Water and Waste

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Committee on Waste and Environmental Solutions operations, maintenance and capital works, including contracted out services.

2      Highlights for the quarter include:

·           Waste Facilities and Services Contracts handover took place on 1 July 2017.

·           The Education and Promotions Officer role was filled by an internal candidate and the Waste Minimisation Officer has been advertised with a number of applicants applying.

·           The Special Hazardous Waste review at Green Island landfill has progressed and the report with findings is being prepared.

·           DCC and FoodShare have established joint promotion for food rescue services in the CBD.

·           The kerbside recycling bin checking programme is progressing well with the early signs showing a reduction in contamination rates from the first to second and third check.

·           The Vogel Street Recycling Facility has been installed.

·           The team previously known as Solid Waste has had a name change and is now called Waste and Environmental Solutions with a Group Manager appointed. A review of the team structure, roles and responsibilities is about to commence. This review will inform the scope of the teams’ activities going forward.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Waste and Environmental Solutions Activity Report for the Quarter ended 30 September 2017. 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Waste and Environmental Solutions activity provides for effective collection, resource recovery and residual disposal in a way that protects public health, and minimises impact on the environment.

4      The Waste and Environmental Solutions activity includes:

·           Kerbside collection of waste and recycling for most urban and city residents and small businesses.

·           Disposal Facilities (landfill and transfer station) for waste and Resource Recovery Centre (recycling and reuse store) are provided for at Councils Green Island site. The Waikouaiti site has both a transfer station for waste disposal and recycling facilities. Middlemarch has a transfer station and a hosted community recycling drop off centre. Waste collected at the community transfer stations is then transferred to Green Island Landfill for landfill disposal. All recycling is sent to the Material Recovery Centre for sorting and transportation to recycling markets.

·           Public place recycling infrastructure and servicing is provided on the streets in the CBD and several satellite locations in the district.

·           Monitoring the state of the Council’s open and five closed landfills in accordance with the conditions of consents.

·           Education programmes promoting “rethinking, reducing, reusing and recycling”, cleaner production and sustainable business practice.

DISCUSSION

Management of Waste and Environmental Solutions services

5      Kerbside collection services (refuse and recyclables) are carried out by Enviroway Ltd in urban Dunedin.  Kerbside collection services in Middlemarch are carried out by a sub-contractor to Enviroway Ltd. 

6      The management and operation of the Green Island landfill is carried out by Waste Management Ltd. The transfer stations and resource recovery centres at Waikouaiti and Middlemarch are managed by Waste Management Ltd.

7      The monitoring and reporting for Councils one active and five closed landfills is carried out by GHD Ltd.

8      The collection of illegally dumped rubbish, empting of street litter bins, including recycling bins and refuse and recycling collection services in the CBD, are contracted to McCallum Street Sweeping Services Ltd.

 

 

 

 

 

Non-financial performance

Service

9      Number of complaints regarding missed collections after 4pm

 

10    During July and August missed collections were down on the previous year, but with an increase in the number of bags/bins being missed. This may have occurred due to the contractor putting drivers onto different runs to cover leave or illness.

11    This measure is being reviewed as it is dependent on the time the customer reports a missed collection. Customers can become accustomed to a regular time of day when their bags/bins are collected and may call in a missed collection earlier than 4.00pm.

Value and Efficiency

12    Total waste collected and diverted.

13    Overall diverted material and contamination rates were much the same as last year. There has been a small drop off in aluminium cans and cardboard and a slight increase in plastics, steel cans and glass. Contamination rates remain fairly high at around 11% on average.

Major initiatives

14    Waste Services Contracts – The Green Island Landfill and Transfer Station Management – The contract started on the 1st of July 2017. Waste Management Ltd employed approximately half of the previous Delta staff, which helped with a smooth transition with little disruption to the customers experience at the site.  Heavy rainfall and a few technical issues with a leachate pump station and the weighbridge at the start of the contract kept landfill staff busy in the initial days following taking over the site. The site is generally looking tidier, with a smaller landfill face which has reduced windblown litter and improved housekeeping overall. 

15    Waste Management Ltd has brought in technical staff to review site health and safety, future landfill development and gas field management. Their industry expertise informs site development and identifies opportunities to increase operational efficiencies.

16    The landfill gas collection system has been identified as a priority area for improvement and progress has been made towards enhancing the performance. The early indication is that these initial improvements have already resulted in an increase in the quantity of gas being collected for beneficial use by the Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant.

17    Rural Transfer Stations and Rural Skip Days - Contract negotiations stalled and a temporary three month contract was established to ensure the continuity of services to the community and allow sufficient time to complete negotiations to the satisfaction of both parties.

18    Staff have reached agreement on terms and conditions for a 9 month + 1 year contract period. This timeframe allows for further investigation of a collaborative contractor/community site operations model, which may be tendered with the next kerbside collection waste and recycling service contract.

19    The Waikouaiti Transfer Station and Resource Recovery Centre - Waste Management Ltd has successfully transitioned into operating the Waikouaiti and Middlemarch Transfer stations.  The immediate priorities are to improve safety and operational efficiency this year, with minor maintenance and capital works planned for summer through to autumn.

20    Active and Closed Landfill monitoring - The Environmental Monitoring and Reporting Contract was awarded to GHD. The first round of environmental monitoring has taken place.

21    Special Hazardous Waste – The handling of special hazardous waste acceptance was previously undertaken by Delta.  This function is now handled by staff and an independent review has been undertaken by MWH. 

22    The review has provided a framework for improvement and staff are reviewing scope for implementation.  A significant amount of time and effort has already been spent advising consultants/developers/businesses and landowners about the landfill acceptance criteria and testing requirements. 

23    Staff intend to work with Waste Management Ltd to improve the application process and operational management of special and hazardous wastes to landfill.

24    City Recycling Facilities – The Moray Place Recycling facility continues to be well supported by the community with a significant quantity of clean recyclables being collected from the site. Additional servicing costs have been incurred in relation to emptying the cardboard collection bin which fills up quickly. The Contract Coordinator is reviewing the number of available cardboard collection sites in the immediate area with a view to identifying the potential for other collection locations.

25    The Vogel Street Recycling Facility has been installed. The design of this facility reflects the historic nature of the site giving a nod to the print industry that thrived in the area in the late 1800’s. The insignia cut-outs on this facility are the markings used by the print industry at the time for editing and correction of print script. 

26    City Cardboard Collection Kerbside –The City Custodian checks the CBD twice a week on the day following collection to ensure the streets are free from cardboard and to talk to business operators about the presentation of cardboard at kerbside. The Contract Coordinator oversees this process and where necessary intervenes if an issue has been identified in order to find an appropriate resolution. Staff have received positive feedback on how much tidier the city pavements have been since the changes to cardboard collection were introduced in May.

27    City Cardboard Collection Back of House – As with kerbside there has been some tweaking of the back of house cardboard collection service with a couple of sites that faced challenges and new sites established.

28    In some areas the bins have been filling up quickly and a second collection bin needed to be supplied and in a couple of cases there has been overuse by one business which has displaced capacity for collection for other users of the facility. These issues have only occurred in a small number of locations and in most instances have been resolved. Staff have also received positive feedback from customers and the contractor about the back of house cardboard collection service. 

29    Kerbside Recycling Bin Inspections - This is a twelve week pilot programme that aims to further reduce mixed recycling bin contamination rates and minimise hazardous materials being deposited in recycling bins. The Kerbside recycling bin inspections commenced Monday 17th July and will conclude on Friday 6th October. The programme gained good local media coverage in addition to significant social media activity and backed up with a broad marketing campaign.

30    To date over 2,700 yellow lidded mixed recycling bins have been inspected at least once. The initial 6 week period shows a significant improvement with those bins that have been checked 3 times i.e. an increase from 40%-70% in the ‘WOW!’ (very good recycling) category.

31    The iPad application used by the kerbside bin checking team has provided live real time view of inspections. The programme has drawn interest from other councils in the region who are keen to tap into the methodology. The kerbside contractor has indicated anecdotally a noticeable improvement in recycling quality.

32    Waste Minimisation Events – Staff attended the Otago Farmers Market (OFM) ‘Waste Free Living Event’ to promote the Love Food Hate Waste campaign. This event was supported by other groups who were promoting various waste minimisation practices i.e. reducing the consumption of plastic bags, reuse bag making and give-aways and composting. OFM vendors continue to be encouraging the use of reusable carry and produce bags at the market.

33    E-waste Recycling – Negotiations with Cargill Enterprises are underway to receive all e-waste from DCC drop off sites (currently the Rummage Reuse Store). This will include TV’s, which have previously gone to another recycler in Christchurch, and the introduction of a battery recycling service.

34    The City Custodian has been applying stickers to non-compliant refuse bags and tagging mixed recycling bins and speaking to people at home about the correct use of bags and bins.  Follow up of areas with non-compliance are made the following fortnight. The City Custodian is guided by the Contracts Coordinator to check also on any non-compliant bags or bins that are reported by the Kerbside Collections Contractor. 

35    Illegal dumping hot spot areas are checked regularly as are DCC litter bins and the general tidiness of Dunedin streets in addition to other checks on DCC infrastructure e.g. bus shelters, parks bins, the water network/reticulation.  Any tagging or overfull bins or leaking tobies/hydrants etc. are reported back through DCC Customer Services Agency for distribution to appropriate Council departments or contractors to action.

36    Organics Reduction – A collaborative social media campaign promoting both Good Food Dunedin and Love Food Hate Waste will be launched in October and run through to the end of December. Recipes will be posted that will support the reduction of food waste in the home, wrapping up with some specific hints and tips for Christmas which will have a broader waste minimisation focus. 

37    Flood Relief Response – The team supported the recent flood clean-up efforts by providing kerbside collection services for sandbags and skip deployment for flood damaged waste in the worst affected areas.

 

Capital projects

Name

Budget Full Year

Actual YTD

Green Island Landfill Gas Collection

$0.00

 

Green Island Landfill Improvements to Final Cap

$100,000.00

 

Green Island Landfill Leachate Collection System

$209,700.00

 

Green Island Portacom Purchase

$0.00

$22,000.00

Recycling Wheelie Bins

$0.00

$76,000.00

Waikouaiti Transfer Station

$90,000.00

 

Waikouaiti Final Capping

$50,000.00

 

City Recycling Facilities

$0.00

 

Green Island Landfill Renewals

$325,600.00

$4,700.00

Litter Bin Renewals

$24,700.00

 

 

38    There have been two unplanned capital spends in this financial year. These are:

a)     The purchase of a Portacom from Delta Ltd, which is the office at the Green Island Landfill.

b)     The purchase of additional yellow-lidded mixed recycling and blue glass bins, as the stock had been depleted.

OPTIONS

39    As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

40    Areas of focus for the next quarter will be:

·           The Vogel Street Recycling Facility will be fully operational. A flyer advising residents and small businesses of the new recycling facility and how to use it will be circulated in and around the Vogel Street area. Carrier bags for recyclables made from fully recovered materials will be distributed in the area the week commencing 9th October and made available for collection from the Civic Centre Customer Services Agency.  

·           Partnering with Cargill Enterprises to promote e-waste recycling services and support for social enterprise in Dunedin. A launch date will be notified once negotiations have been concluded.

·           The data from two more rounds of the kerbside bin checking is being collected/collated as the pilot phase continues. A report will be prepared on completion of the pilot programme which will outline the learnings and opportunities to develop an enduring process that supports good recycling practice at kerbside.

·           The second stage improvements to the Waikouaiti Transfer Station, Resource Recovery Centre and Closed Landfill will progress in collaboration with the community.   A Working Group will work alongside the team during the second stage of development. 

·           Over the next 6 months 3 additional wells will be added to the Green Island landfill gas collection system and a more detailed programme for bringing additional gas wells on line is under development.

 

Signatories

Author:

Catherine Irvine - Solid Waste Manager

Hayley Knight - Business Performance Coordinator/PA

Authoriser:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

WMMP update report March-September 2017

33

 SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure that is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Waste and Environmental Solutions activity supports the outcomes of a number of strategies.

 

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

 

Sustainability

The Waste and Environmental Solutions activity contributes positively to the environmental interests of the community through refuse and recycling collection at the kerbside and public places, educating and promoting environmentally sustainable behaviour and managing landfill and transfer station facilities.

 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The Waste and Environmental Solutions activity is included in the Long Term Plan.

 

Financial considerations

The updates reported are within existing operating and capital budgets.

 

Significance

This decision is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

Engagement – external

As an update report no external engagement has been undertaken.

 

Engagement - internal

As an update report no internal engagement has been undertaken.

 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

 

Conflict of Interest

There are no identified conflicts of interest.

 

Community Boards

Not applicable.

 

 


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3 Waters Activity Report for the Quarter Ending 30 September 2017

Department: Property and Water and Waste

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Committee on water, wastewater and stormwater operations, maintenance and capital works, including contracted out services.

2      Highlights for the quarter include:

a)     Infrastructure strategy review and 10 year plan development processes are well under way

b)     Improved response to the rain event in July working with other council teams and contractors. The review report is currently underway.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Three Waters Activity Report for the Quarter ending 30 September 2017.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The water activity delivers the effective collection, treatment and reticulation. The wastewater activity provides the collection, treatment and discharge.  The stormwater activity encompasses collection and safe disposal.  All three activities are managed in a way that protects public health, and minimises impact on the environment.

4      The Three Waters activity includes:

a)  Collection and treatment of raw water.

b)  Reticulation of treated water for drinking and firefighting.

c)  Collection and treatment of wastewater.

d)  Discharge of treated wastewater water and disposal of biosolids.

e)  Collection and discharge of stormwater.

DISCUSSION

Management of Three Waters services

5      The collection, treatment, reticulation and disposal of drinking water, wastewater and stormwater are managed directly by Council.  The maintenance of the water, wastewater and stormwater pipe networks is contracted to City Care Limited.

6      The Council’s water supply service consists of four service areas: - metropolitan Dunedin, and the three outlying areas of West Taieri, Outram and the Northern Schemes, which includes some areas that are now fed from Mount Grand; as well as the areas of Waitati, Warrington, Seacliff and Merton, Waikouaiti and Karitane, that are supplied from the Waikouaiti water treatment plant.

7      The water supply network includes 21,000 hectares of water catchment; 1,386 km of pipeline; 28 pumping stations; 63 reservoirs (raw and treated) and 10 treatment plants.

8      The Council’s wastewater service consists of seven service areas, including metropolitan Dunedin and six outlying areas: Green Island, Mosgiel, Middlemarch, Seacliff, Waikouaiti/Karitane and Warrington. The Metropolitan system takes the east and west harbour communities of Portobello and Port Chalmers respectively and discharges from Tahuna via the long ocean outfall. Green Island takes the treated Mosgiel effluent and discharges this along with wastes from Green Island, Abbotsford and coastal south Dunedin via the ocean outfall at Waldronville.

9      The wastewater network comprises 909 km of pipes, 87 reticulation pumping stations, 115 domestic pumping stations and seven treatment plants. The service is provided to approximately 107,000 residents and 106 trade customers.

10    The Council’s stormwater service manages the collection and disposal of stormwater to domestic and commercial residents in eight service areas – metropolitan Dunedin and seven outlying areas: Brighton/Waldronville; Green Island, Mosgiel, Middlemarch, Mosgiel, Outram, Port Chalmers and Waikouaiti/Karitane and Warrington. The stormwater network comprises 372 km of pipes and 11 pumping stations.

Non-financial performance

Service

11    Total treated water network demand in millions m3 (production from all metro treatment plants)

12    Water demand is following a similar trend compared to last year.

13    Percentage response times met ≤24hours

Quarter Ending 30 September 2017

Response Times Met

Water

439/461

95%

Wastewater

116/135

86%

Stormwater

18/21

86%

 

14    The rain event on 21 July drove an increase in stormwater and wastewater related reactive work orders. This stretched the resourcing of City Care Ltd, which was unable to meet the response target for that month.

15    Response time targets were achieved in August and September, with greater than 95% of priority 1 to 3 reactive maintenance work orders completed within 24hours.

16    Number of customer complaints for drinking water

Customer Complaint Concerning

Number of Complaints (Q1)

Continuity of supply

76

Drinking water clarity

86

Drinking water odour

0

Drinking water pressure or flow

34

Local authorities response to water issues

8

 

17    There was an increase in the number of customer complaints in August related to a contamination event in the central city. The increase in clarity complaints alerted staff to the issue and triggered the response. Over the quarter there were more clarity complaints than normal due to this event.

18    The August event is likely to have increased customers vigilance with regard to water quality. The complaints will be analysed to understand potential network improvements.

19    Number of wet weather wastewater overflows

20    The rainfall across this quarter was not significant outside the event in July. The Musselburgh rain gauge recorded a cumulative total of 246.2mm and 156.4mm for July, 29.8mm for August and 60mm for September respectively. 

21    On 21 July from 11:50am, for the next 24 hours, the Musselburgh rain gauge recorded 92.6mm of rainfall which equates to between a 1 in 10 year (82.5mm) and 1 in 50 year (109mm) event.

22    During this quarter there where 14 recorded overflow spills for all sites.  Most of these occurred during the 21 July event.

23    Kaikorai Valley overflow spilt the most frequently, 7 times in total.  The most significant was across 3 days in July – 21st, 22nd, 23rd with a total volume spilt of 2,560m3.This related to the rainfall event that was between a 1 in 10 year and 1 in 50 year event.  

24    There was also a significant overflow on 18th September with a volume of 1,065m3. This related to rainfall the equivalent of almost a 1 in 2 year event.  Other overflows recorded small volumes and related to rain levels of less than 1 in 2 years.

25    Due to the small amount of rain in August there were no overflow recorded.


 

Value & Efficiency

26    Number of water main breaks (12month rolling average)

27    The on-going decrease in watermain breaks suggests the positive effect of the water main renewal programme. Also, environmental factors such as short periods of concurrent frosts, and an associated low incidence of pipe freezing during winter were likely a factor.

28    Average duration of unplanned watermain shutdowns in minutes

29    The high average shutdown time of 118 minutes in September 2017 was caused by three jobs which took longer than normal. One required replacement of a larger section than anticipated; another was caused by a contractor hitting a watermain.


 

30    Number of foul sewer blockages (12month rolling average)

 

31    The number of sewer blockages so far in the 2017/18 year has been consistent with the previous year. The causes of these blockages can vary, but are often caused by overgrown tree roots in the pipes.

32    Percentage wastewater discharge consent compliance

33    Wastewater discharge consent compliance the first quarter of the 2017/18 was 96.57%

34    The majority of the Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP) breached consented flow rate during the rain event in late July.

35    In July, testing related to the Tahuna WWTP showed consent limit breaches in beach water faecal coliforms in 8 out of 9 beaches, with mussels at these beaches also exceeding in 4 out of 8 mussel samples. This sampling was completed 4 days after the rain event in July, and coliform levels quickly reduced. This breach and associated risk was communicated with the public through media releases and social media.


 

36    Percentage planned maintenance completed

37    The network maintenance team from City Care Ltd completed all planned maintenance work orders within the required timeframes for this quarter. The internal plant maintenance team averaged 77% completion of planned maintenance work orders within the required timeframes for this quarter.  Service delivery practices of the internal team are under review to improve performance.

Major initiatives

38    Central City boil Water Notice Review – An internal review focusing on the actions that lead to the Central City Boil Water Notice in August and the subsequent response will be complete in October. The review will identify causes and potential improvement actions.

39    Reid Avenue and Carlyle Road Stormwater Pump Station (SWPS) Upgrades – Following a review of the pump stations' performance during the July rain event, the upgrade and replacement of these assets has been expedited.   some property damage occurred in the Reid Avenue and Carlyle Road SWPS catchments. It is anticipated that construction will begin in April 2018.

40    Coastal Erosion – This is now part of the 3 Waters activity. In regards to Ocean Beach, staff have continued to monitor the performance of the geotextile tubes. Since the installation in July 2016, rocks have been cleared and additional sand placed in front of the structures.  A sand stockpile at Ocean Beach is available if sand levels drop in front of the coastal protection structures during storms. Regular meetings with the St Clair Action Group are occurring.

41    Kaikorai Valley Phase 3 – The review of the Kaikorai Valley Phase 3 project is largely complete. High priority flood mitigation work for the School Street has been separated for early delivery and will be tendered in October.

42    Ross Creek Refurbishment Project – The construction works for the Ross Creek Dam refurbishment are well underway. Due to unforeseen archaeological findings, geology, and weather, the works are forecast to be completed by the end of the May 2018, a couple of months later than originally planned.

43    Waikouaiti watermain renewal – This work is on track for completion in early 2018.

44    Switchboard Upgrades – This project is to upgrade a number of switchboards to ensure health and safety compliance. The first stage (Mosgiel WWTP) has been completed, and stage two (Green Island WWTP) is well underway. The third stage of works at Tahuna is planned to be tendered in next few weeks. Further packages will follow.

45    Top 5 Capital Projects summary

Name

Construction contract Budget

Construction contract actual to date*

Ross Creek Reservoir

$6,610k

$2,392k

Switchboard Upgrades

$2,200k

$1,165k

Waikouaiti Renewals

$1,600k

$485k

Kaikorai Valley 3

TBC

$391k

North East Valley

TBC

$0k

*Figures are as at 26th September 2017

OPTIONS

46    As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

47    Areas of focus for the next quarter will be:

 

a)     Finalising the 10 Year Plan and Infrastructure Strategy.

b)     Ongoing capital works

c)     Implementing improvements identified from the Central City Boil Water Notice Review.

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Hayley Knight - Business Improvement Coordinator

Tom Dyer - Group Manager 3 Waters

Authoriser:

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure that is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Three waters activities support the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

The 3 Waters activity contributes positively to the interests of the community by ensuring the provision of safe drinking water, and the safe and sustainable disposal of wastewater and stormwater.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy

The 3 Waters Activities are included in the Long Term Plan.

Financial considerations

The updates reported are within existing operating and capital budgets.

Significance

This decision is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement - external

As an update report no external engagement has been undertaken.

Engagement – internal

As an update report no internal engagement has been undertaken.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety / Conflict of Interest etc.

There are no identified risks.

Community Boards

Not applicable.

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

 

Water Safety Plans - Framework, Development and Implementation

Department: Water and Waste

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report is the first in a series to provide Council an overview of the approach to assessing and managing risks associated with the supply of drinking water to the city. 

2      The primary mechanism in New Zealand to assess and manage risks to water supply is through the implementation of Water Safety Plans (WSPs), a requirement under the Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Act 2007.

3      In turn, the WSPs result in a programme of both capital and non-capital projects aimed at reducing the risks identified within the plans to an acceptable level.

4      This report provides an overview of WSPs and the framework in place for the management of risks to DCC’s drinking water supplies, and provides an update on various projects underway to mitigate these risks.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the report.

 

BACKGROUND

5      This report aims to give Councillors an overview of the mechanisms in place in Dunedin to protect public health from risks associated with the provision of community drinking water supplies.

6      This report also provides an update on various projects underway to mitigate these risks, including the ‘Security of Supply’ project.

DISCUSSION

Drinking Water Risk Management Framework and Water Safety Plans

7      A WSP is a plan to ensure the safety of drinking water using a comprehensive risk assessment and risk management approach that encompasses all steps in water supply from catchment to consumer. The requirement to produce WSPs was introduced by the Health (Drinking Water) Amendment Act 2007 (‘the Act’), as part of the Government’s decision in November 2000 to introduce a “flexible, risk management based” legislative regime for drinking water in New Zealand.

8      The Act requires all drinking water suppliers that service communities with populations greater than 500 to develop a WSP for each drinking water supply. The Act requires each WSP to be approved by a Ministry of Health-registered Drinking Water Assessor, and updated and re-submitted for approval no less than five-yearly. The Assessor reviews the submitted plan to confirm it meets all specific requirements of the Act.

9      Areas of a WSP which do not comply with the Act (‘non-conformances’) are noted by the Assessor and the plan is sent back to the drinking water supplier for addressing prior to resubmission of the plan. The Assessor can also make non-binding ‘recommendations’, which are areas where improvements can be made that are not mandatory requirements. Suppliers can choose whether or not to address these areas in their resubmitted plans.

10    The risk assessment section of the WSPs follows the Ministry of Health guidance documents for each of the relevant individual system elements (e.g. filtration, disinfection, water storage, distribution). Risks are scored on likelihood and consequence, to quantify risk in accordance with DCC’s Risk Management Policy. All risks scoring ‘high’ or ‘extreme’ risk have improvement actions assigned, aimed at bringing the residual risk score down to a more tolerable (‘low’ or ‘moderate’) level.

11    Success or otherwise of the WSPs is measured by their implementation, for both the plan itself (how well we adhere to what we say we are doing) and the improvement programme (whether the programme is being implemented as stated in the plan). The Drinking Water Assessor audits the implementation of the WSP under the provisions section 69ZL of the Act at least once in the duration of the plan’s life. The audit involves site visits and a documentation review to ensure the WSP is being appropriately implemented, and may identify non-conformances with the WSP that must be rectified prior to the audit being completed/closed.

12    Penalties for non-compliance with the requirements set out in section 69Z of the Act (‘Duty to prepare and implement water safety plan’), are set out in section 69ZZV of the Act, and include ‘…a fine not exceeding $200,000 and, if the offence is a continuing one, to a further fine not exceeding $10,000 for every day or part of a day during which the offence continues.’

Dunedin City Council’s Water Safety Plans

13    DCC has five WSPs, written in accordance with guidance documents issued by the Ministry of Health, and consistent with the best-practice format recommended by the Drinking Water Assessor. Each WSP includes an overview of the water supply, discussion on barriers to contamination, risk evaluation and management, improvements programmed to further protect the system, overview of contingency plans (in case of contamination), and an update and review process for the WSP.

14    The largest of DCC’s WSPs (known as the 'Dunedin City' WSP) encompasses the metropolitan Dunedin water supply for the Mount Grand, Southern and Port Chalmers systems. Together these treatment plants supply 89% of the city's residential customers. The Dunedin City WSP was approved by the Drinking Water Assessor in October 2016.

15    A report on the audit of the Dunedin WSP completed by the Assessor in May 2017 identified no non-conformances, and included a comment from the assessor that the WSP was being ‘well implemented’. Attachment A shows the improvement programme for the Dunedin City water supply.

16    The Mosgiel WSP encompasses the system supplied by the nine bores and five water treatment plants supplying the Mosgiel area, which makes up 9% of the city’s residential water customers. The Mosgiel plan was approved by the Drinking Water Assessor in July 2017, and an implementation audit will be completed at the Assessor’s discretion at least once in the next five years. Attachment B shows the improvement programme for the Mosgiel water supply.

17    The three remaining WSPs cover the Waikouaiti, West Taieri and Outram treatment plants supplying the remainder of water-serviced communities. The Outram, Waikouaiti and West Taieri WSPs (most recently approved by the Assessor in 2013, 2010 and 2010 respectively) are currently being updated and will be submitted to the Assessor for approval in the 2017/18 financial year.

Improvement Programme

18    The WSPs identify risks to DCC’s water supplies, and improvement projects to mitigate or reduce these risks. Key improvement projects identified in the WSPs are identified below.

Security of Supply project

19    The Security of Supply project aims to increase the resilience of the metropolitan raw water supply to significant events, such as severe drought, catchment fire, failure of the Taieri river crossing, and/or failure or deteriorating performance of the raw water pipelines. The project includes several smaller projects, at varying stages of completion shown in Figure 1. Attachment C shows the changing risk profile of the metropolitan raw water system over time.

Early stage projects

Progress

Cost

Deep Creek Pipeline Renewal

Completed 2012

$2.2M

Renewal at Deep Creek Intake

Completed 2014

$0.4M

Southern to Mt Grand treated water pump station

Completed 2016

$1.0M

Ross Creek Reservoir Refurbishment

In Progress

2012/13 - 2017/18

$6.6M

Mid stage projects

Ross Creek to Mt Grand Raw Water Pump Station and Dalziel Rd pipeline

Planned

2018/19 - 2019/20

$4.5M

Ultrasonic algal control for Ross Creek

Planned

2018/19

$0.1M

Ultrasonic algal control for Sullivan’s Dam

Under review

$0.1M

Late stage projects

Progress

Cost

Sullivan’s Dam to Ross Creek pipeline

Under review

$1.4M

Related long-term renewal projects

Renew Deep Creek / Deep Stream pipelines as one pipeline

2035-40

$90.0M

Renewal at Deep Stream intake

2059

$0.8M

Renew Taieri River Bridge or alternative crossing point

2084

$1.6M

Figure 1: Security of Supply Projects.

 

20    The ‘Sullivan’s Dam to Ross Creek pipeline’ project is currently under review to determine whether the project is a cost-effective means of providing a backup raw water supply in a drought event or other loss-of-water scenario. The volume of water available from this source under drought conditions is marginal in terms of flow, and may be uneconomic when compared with the cost of renewing the supply lines from the reservoir to Ross Creek. A cost-benefit analysis will be completed and a report presented to ISCOM in the 2017/18 financial year.

21    The renewal of the Deep Creek and Deep Stream pipelines as one pipeline is tentatively planned for the five-year period 2035 to 2040. The timing of this renewal will be confirmed by a formal condition assessment closer to the end of their expected life; with the renewal date brought forward should the condition of the pipelines warrant it. The timing of the Deep Creek and Deep Stream pipeline renewal will determine the timing of the Taieri River bridge renewal.

Mosgiel Raw Water Catchment Management Plan

22    The development of the Mosgiel WSP highlighted the need for a more detailed assessment to identify risks to the security of the raw water source for the Mosgiel bores supply (the Taieri aquifer), and potential mitigation options.

23    Staff are in the early stages of developing a plan, with some preliminary liaison with the ORC. A report to ISCOM on the recommended plan will be presented in the 2018 calendar year.

Future of Port Chalmers Treatment Plant

24    The Port Chalmers Water Treatment Plant (WTP) operates on a seasonal basis only, to meet cruise ship demand. Staff will complete investigative work during the 2018/19 year to confirm the feasibility of enabling Port Chalmers to be supplied year round from the metropolitan (Mount Grand and Southern) supply, allowing the Port Chalmers WTP and two associated dams to be decommissioned. A report to ISCOM on the decommissioning of Port Chalmers WTP and associated dams will be presented within the next 12 months.

Seismic Resilience

25    $2.1M has been identified over nine years in the 2018/19-27/28 LTP budgets to improve earthquake resilience of network assets, treatment plants, structures and dams. Funding will be allocated across 3 Waters assets based on the results of a formal seismic assessment process (yet to be completed).

Other Improvements

26    Several non-capital improvement projects are identified within the WSP improvement programmes, including business process improvements and policy updates. Key improvements are outlined below.

27    Plant Asset Data Improvement (PADI) Project, Criticality and Condition Assessments: Staff are working to establish a hierarchy of asset information, formalise asset lifespan and condition assumptions, and develop a framework for plant asset criticality. This work will help to inform deferral and renewal decision-making, and support more informed trade-offs in relation to ‘run to fail’ or ‘replace early’ approaches for different asset classes.

28    Plant Maintenance Work Management Rollout: An electronic work management system has been partially implemented in the water treatment function, with work orders being generated to ensure plant maintenance (including instrument calibration) is completed on time. Work is underway to set up schedules for the remaining routine maintenance and monitoring tasks, providing a more robust, auditable system than the spreadsheet and logbook-based process currently employed for some tasks.

29    Water Bylaw Update: A review of the Water Bylaw is due to commence before April 2018. The updated Bylaw will include clearer requirements for backflow prevention devices, which prevent contaminants from being drawn into the water system.

OPTIONS

30    As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

31    The three remaining WSPs (Outram, Waikouaiti and West Taieri) will be submitted to the Drinking Water Assessor for approval during the 2017/18 financial year.

32    Staff will continue to progress projects identified in the WSPs improvement programmes, including the Security of Supply project.

33    Staff will review the findings of the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) Havelock North Stage 2 Inquiry report (due out December 2017) and consider any recommendations that may impact council's supply of drinking water.

34    Over the next 18 months, staff will report on the following to the Committee:

a)     Summary of the DIA Havelock North Stage 2 inquiry report and progress update on Mosgiel raw water supply catchment management plan

b)     Future of Sullivan’s dam

c)     Future of Port Chalmers Water Treatment Plant and associated dams

d)     Water Bylaw update / Backflow Prevention Policy

 

Signatories

Author:

Sarah Stewart - Asset Planner

Authoriser:

Tom Dyer - Group Manager 3 Waters

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Improvement Programme - Dunedin City water supply

59

b

Improvement Programme - Mosgiel water supply

61

c

Changing Risk Profile for the Security of Supply Projects

63


 

 
SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

                             

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

This report contributes to the implementation of the 3 Waters Strategy.

 

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

 

Sustainability

The approach outlined in this report supports the long-term goals for drinking water outlined in the 3 Waters Strategic Direction Statement.

 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The approach outlined in this report supports the long-term goals for drinking water outlined in the LTP/Annual Plan/Financial Strategy/Infrastructure Strategy.

 

Financial considerations

This report contains no options; projects outlined within the report are included in the draft LTP budgets.

 

Significance

As this report contains no options, no assessment of significance is required.

 

Engagement – external

Staff have engaged with the Drinking Water Assessor during the development of the WSP’s and associated risk mitigation projects.

 

Engagement - internal

Various WWS staff have been engaged with to ensure the progress and status of work included in this report are accurately reported. As future project development work is carried out WWS staff will engage with other departments to explore opportunities to contribute to the wider strategic framework.

 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

As this is an update report only, no additional risks considered. Risks relating to individual projects described in this report are managed as part of routine project management processes.

 

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest have been identified.

 

Community Boards

This report specifically references projects within the West Harbour and Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board areas. Both affected Board Chairs have been briefed. Staff will engage more fully with the boards as the relevant work streams progress.

 

 



Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

ATTACHMENT 1: CHANGING RISK PROFILE FOR THE SECURITY OF SUPPLY Projects

 

 

 

Present Day (2011)

No of Days’ Supply Citywide using ADPW Demand

(44,100m³/day)

No of Days’ Supply Citywide using Mean Demand

(36,500 m³/day)

No of Days’ Supply Citywide using

Restricted Demand

(33,000m³/day)

 

 

Pre-Security of Supply Projects

No disaster event

Mean flow

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

24 days

29 days

34 days

Loss of Deep Creek

Mean flow

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

24 days

29 days

34 days

Loss of Deep Creek and Deep Stream

Mean flow

20 days

22 days

25 days

30 Day Drought

20 days

22 days

25 days

Loss of Taieri Bores, Silverstream and DC/DS

Mean flow

12 days

14 days

16 days

30 Day Drought

12 days

14 days

16 days

 

Current (2017)

No disaster event

Mean flow

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

Loss of Deep Creek

Mean flow

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

Loss of Deep Creek and Deep Stream

Mean flow

47 days

149 days

Infinite

30 Day Drought

30 days

97 days

Infinite

Loss of Taieri Bores, Silverstream and DC/DS

Mean flow

12 days

14 days

16 days

30 Day Drought

12 days

14 days

16 days

 

 

Future (2031)

No of Days’ Supply Citywide using Future ADPW Demand

(49,200 m³/day)

No of Days’ Supply Citywide using Mean Demand

(40,800 m³/day)

No of Days’ Supply Citywide using

Restricted Demand

(36,700 m³/day)

Security of Supply Projects complete

No disaster event

Mean flow

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

Loss of Deep Creek

Mean flow

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

Infinite

Infinite

Infinite

Loss of Deep Creek and Deep Stream

Mean flow

455 days

Infinite

Infinite

30 Day Drought

125 days

Infinite

Infinite

Loss of Taieri Bores, Silverstream and DC/DS

Mean flow

18 days

24 days

28 days

30 Day Drought

14 days

17 days

20 days

 

Key:

Green

Provides an infinite number of days’ supply

Provides > 30 days’ supply

Provides <= 30 day’s supply

Yellow

Orange

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

 

Parks and Recreation Activity Report for Quarter Ending 30 September 2017

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1          This report updates the Committee on Parks & Recreation operations, maintenance and capital works, including contracted out services.

2          Highlights for the quarter include:

·      The adoption of Dunedin City Council’s Parks and Recreation Strategy by Council at 27 August meeting, which represents the completion of the Council’s Strategic Framework.

·      Endorsement of the Reserves and Beaches Bylaw by the Minister of Conservation.

·      The Bylaws Subcommittee considered and heard the submissions relating to the Camping Control Bylaw.

·      Contract 7000 - Animal and Pest Control Services was awarded to Otago Pest Services Ltd and D M Holdings.

3          The Community Pools have opened for the season; Mosgiel Pool and Port Chalmers Pool opened in September, and St Clair Salt Water Pool opened the first weekend in October.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Parks and Recreation Activity Report for the Quarter ending 30 September 2017.

 

BACKGROUND

4          The Parks & Recreation activity provides public access to pools, urban green space, sports fields and facilities, recreation and leisure opportunities and a botanic garden of international significance.

DISCUSSION

Management of Parks & Recreation Services

5          Council manages Moana Pool, Mosgiel Community Pool, Port Chalmers Community Pool, and St Clair Hot Saltwater Pool.  The pools support casual swimming, professional swimming coaching, and learn-to-swim programmes. 

6          Moana Pool is open year round, with additional services including: crèche, hydroslides, gym, physiotherapy, massage, and a retail shop.  Mosgiel Community Pool is open seven months of the year and both Port Chalmers Community Pool and St Clair Hot Saltwater Pool are open for six months of the year.  In addition, the Council provides grants for the community pool at Middlemarch, Moana Gow Pool and a number of school pools.

7          The Botanic Garden has 19 themed-garden collections and an aviary and is graded as a Garden of International Significance by the NZ Gardens Trust.

8          Council manages a wide range of open spaces providing parks and recreation facilities, for both organised and casual use including playgrounds, sports fields, cemeteries, parks and walkways.  The maintenance of these spaces is contracted out, with Council staff overseeing operations including formal and informal lease/use arrangements, and the development and implementation of policies and plans relating to parks and recreation. 


 

Non-financial performance

Sports Facilities Bookings

 

9          Bookings decreased significantly in July due to the bad weather, with August and September following the prior year trend.

Visitor Numbers at Moana Pool

10        Visitor numbers at Moana Pool were consistent with the previous year. Slight increases in August and September reflect the Winter Swimming champs and several school swimming tournaments.

 

 

Total Burials at all Cemeteries

11        Cremation numbers reflect competition in the market.  Options for future service delivery are being evaluated. 

 

Volunteer Contribution

 

Month

Number of Volunteers

No. of Hours

Cost equivalent

November 16

18

45

$1,265.40

December 16

15

88

$2,474.56

January  17

34

160

$4,494.20

February 17

75

142

$3993.04

March 17

30

281

$7901.72

April 17

82

441.5

$12,414.98

May 17

68

315

$8,857.8

June 17

47

272

 

$7,648.64

July 17

78

199

$5,595.88

August 17

104

473

$13,300.76

September 17

113

 

401

$11,276.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12        The measured contribution of volunteers dedicating time to Dunedin’s recreation space is steadily rising. The increase is in part a function of active engagement and activation of volunteers through the joint Department of Conservation (DOC) and DCC Volunteer Co-ordinator.

13        Other established volunteer groups such as the Green Hut Track Group are beginning to formally report on their activities. Volunteer activities included habitat restoration and beautification projects.

Major Initiatives

New Contracts

14        Contract 7000 - Animal and Pest Control Services was awarded to Otago Pest Services Ltd and D M Holdings in September. The contract is structured as a panel agreement which allows the DCC to award programmes of work to contractors based upon specific skills and projects. The new contract structure allows for strong collaboration between partnering organisations and the Predator Free Dunedin initiative.

Aramoana Wharf Removal

 

15        Staff met with DOC officers in May to discuss the draft concession. Design, access, mitigation of environmental effects, and location were the areas identified as requiring further work before a final concession will be lodged. Staff are working with the Aramoana Pilots Wharf Restoration Trust to assist in finalising the application before submission.

16        Staff are working with the Trust to relocate salvageable parts of the removed wharf back to Aramoana for use in fundraising. Engagement with key stakeholders’ groups is on-going.

Logan Park Precinct Plan

17        Engagement with a range of stakeholders has begun with staff facilitating a workshop in August.

18        Elected members will be briefed in early November on a draft Logan Park Precinct Plan, including staging and indicative costs.

19        The Precinct Plan is being developed to conclude many years of discussion and inform Long Term Plan preparation.

The reservation of space within cemeteries for non Kāi Tahu Maori in Dunedin (Urupa)

20        Staff will be engaging with iwi and hapu and through the Maori Participation Working Party to identify a location and design for the proposed urupā.

21        This project supports the Parks and Recreation Strategy priorities of reflecting our cultures and heritage, and supporting iwi and hapu in the use of open space for traditional activities, such as burials and urupā.

Pest Control

22        Staff have been working with OSPRI as part of the TB free NZ Programme to control and eradicate bovine TB in possums.

23        Approval was granted for OSPRI to carry out a ground based Pest Control operation on Mt Cargill and Bethune’s gully. This work is set to begin in the first week of October and will be completed by mid-November (weather dependant).

 

Town Belt Education Initiative

24        The Initiative is a collaborative education model, designed to provide schools with the tools and resources to use the Town Belt as a context for education.  

25        A Strategic Leadership Group (SLG) will provide governance for the Initiative and is composed of: The Department of Conservation (DOC) Dunedin City Council (DCC), Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou, Kāti Huirapa Runaka ki Puketeraki, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Dunedin Amenities Society, representatives from role model schools, University of Otago, Toitu, Chamber of Commerce, and Predator Free Dunedin.

26        The SLG will employ an Education Coordinator to work with teachers, students, and community to deliver the initiative and 10 schools (ranging from early childhood centres to high schools) have agreed to be part of a pilot.

Volunteer Projects

27        Restoration of the Purakaunui estuary is underway with DOC, DCC, student groups, and Purakaunui iwi. The project has received biodiversity funding.

28        As part of the Keep Dunedin Beautiful programme, Bunning’s hardware store, through the DCC volunteer coordinator, carried out a planting day along the cycleway on Portobello Road.

29        A working group arrangement was also established with the Kellas St Reserve Group. This arrangement will see the group carrying out weed control, trapping, and planting within the Kellas St reserve.

30        The Dirty dozen weed control programme continues. This is a collaborative project with DoC, which has a volunteer team carry out a programme of weed control across various Dunedin reserves.

Capital Projects

Name

Budget

Actual (to date)

Status

Logan Park Artificial Turf

$1,000,000

$0

Resource Consent has been granted

Playground improvement

$165,000

$0

Contract to be awarded

Highland Park Reserve Development

$200,000(Development contribution)

$5,165

Construction underway

 

Asset Renewals

Name

Budget

Actual (to date)

 

Sims building and Tahuna Pavilion Asbestos removal

$461,852.44

$427,532.22

Underway

Tahuna Park Pavilion and Grandstand Re-roof

$356,348.75

$321,718

Complete

 

Highland Park

31        The development of Highland Park was awarded to NUMAT and work is underway.  The park is expected to be fininshed by November (weather dependant).


 

Mosgiel Pool                                                    

32        Staff are continuing to work with the Taieri Communities Facilities Trust on the most efficient and effective way forward. A designation change is underway for the Memorial Park area to support both future sport and recreation development and the Trust's fundraising efforts.

All Weather Sports Turf

33        Resource consent was granted at the end of September enabling the deadlines for third party funding applications to be met.

34        Football South and DCC staff are working through the detail of future use. A tender process will commence shortly for a contractor to deliver the project (should all the capital funding be achieved). A detailed design will follow.

Freedom Camping

35        Staff completed the Special Consultative Process (SCP) to review future options for freedom camping in the city. This process sought public feedback on three options:

·           Option 1 – proposed option – to limit freedom camping to certified self-contained vehicles only

·           Option 2 – Status quo with added measures

·           Option 3 -Identifying and adding more locations for unrestricted freedom camping.

36        The outcome of the SCP was presented to the Bylaws Subcommittee in August 2017 and public submissions were heard.

37        The recommendations from the Subcommittee will be considered by Council at its 31 October meeting.

38        Procurement for freedom camping enforcement is underway.

Opening of Community Pools

39        The Mosgiel pool was the first of the community pools to open in September and Port Chalmers community pool opened in mid-September.

40        BBQs were held to celebrate the opening of each of the community pool. A BBQ was held at the St Clair Salt Water Pool opening in the first weekend of October.

Renewals

41        Work to establish bulk storage bays for fertiliser and mulch at Tahuna was completed during August.

OPTIONS

42        As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

43    Areas of focus for the next quarter (1 October – 31 December) will be:

·    Implementing Council's decision on the Freedom Camping Control Bylaw  

·    Establishing a base level of service across the network of DCC tracks following a DOC audit

·    Completing a safety and condition audit of mountain biking tracks on Council land

·    Working with Otago Hockey Association and Kings High School on funding applications for the artificial hockey turf

·    Implementing the Reserves bylaw

·    Working on parks contract delivery and improving consistency in maintenance standards

·    Completion of Sportsfield renovations prior to the summer season

·    Carisbrook pocket park development.

 

Signatories

Author:

Mitchell Turner - Business Performance Coordinator

Authoriser:

Dave Miller - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local services and infrastructure that is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The parks and recreation activity supports the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

The Parks and Recreation activity promotes the social and environmental interest of the community by providing venues and support for sporting and leisure activity and provides garden and open green space that promotes the environmental and social interests of the community.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The parks and recreation activity is included in the long term plan

Financial considerations

The updates reported are within existing operating and capital budgets

Significance

This decision is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

As an update report no external engagement has been undertaken.

Engagement - internal

As an update report no internal engagement has been undertaken.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

Not applicable

Community Boards

Not applicable

 

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

 

Property Services Activity Report for the Quarter Ending 30 September 2017

Department: Water and Waste and Property

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Committee on Property Services operations, maintenance and capital works, including contracted out services.

2      Highlights for the quarter include:

a)     Recruitment is underway for numerous positions in Property Services

b)     Cobb & Co tenancy is in place at the Railway Station

c)     Code of compliance granted for Town Hall

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Property Services Activity Report for the Quarter ending 30 September 2017.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      Property Services aims to provide ‘community good’ through built environments for the city of Dunedin. Portfolios that the Property Services group manages includes: operational property, miscellaneous property, housing and investment property.

4      The Property Services activity includes:

·      Land and tenancy management

·      Facilities and asset management

·      Project management

·      Housing

DISCUSSION

Management of Property Services

5      The Property Services group is responsible for a wide range of Council owned properties.  The group manages land and tenancy, purchasing and disposal of properties to meet the Council’s needs, facilities and asset management and management of housing.

6      The operational portfolio includes property and related land that are required for service administration and delivery purposes by the Council.

7      The miscellaneous portfolio includes a range of properties that are held for community benefit, but not directly used in the delivery of council services – for example the Dunedin Railway and Regent Theatre.

8      The housing portfolio provides affordable housing primarily targeted at those aged 55 years and older.  In addition to the community housing units, this portfolio includes a number of residential properties that have been acquired by the Council in relation to its operational activities.

9      The investment portfolio includes a number of commercial properties that are owned for the purposes of generating a financial return.

Non-financial performance

Service

10    Occupancy rates for housing properties

11    Occupancy rate is determined by the number of current tenancy agreements for the 942 housing units owned by the Council. There are currently 7 housing units unable to be tenanted due to repair work or being out of service.

12    Housing usually remains at a high occupancy rate due to a waiting list of people looking to tenant housing units as they become available. As of the end of September there was a total of 200 people on waiting lists including:

·           117 on the Priority 1 list (over 55 years of age, and within the income and asset limit),

·           23 on the Priority 2 list (over 55 years and older),

·           60 on Priority 3 list (under 55 years of age and within the income and asset limit),

13    Occupancy rates for commercial properties

14    Occupancy rate is determined by the number of current tenancy agreements for the 96 commercial properties (from the miscellaneous and investment portfolios) owned by the Council. Occupancy rates remains below target as some property is due for sale.

15    Cobb and Co taking on tenancy at the Railway Station in July pushed up the occupancy rates for the commercial property portfolio.

16    Forever New vacated the Wall Street premises in September, which brought the occupancy rate back down that month. This vacant space is being advertised with leasing agencies.

Value & Efficiency

17    Percentage of response times met for reactive property maintenance requests

18    The introduction of a basic reactive maintenance tracking system came in to effect part way through May 2017. Since then a total of 851 reactive maintenance work orders have been placed. The majority of reactive maintenance requests have come from DCC staff at the Civic Centre and include requests around issuing of new security tags and furniture for new staff.

19    A total of 601 reactive maintenance work orders were created during the 1st quarter of the 2017/18 year, of which 68% were completed within the required timeframes.

20    Work is currently underway to implement a full maintenance management IT system, and to define clear response time targets for new maintenance contracts.

Major initiatives

21    Review of maintenance contracts – programme of tendering

·      Housing Maintenance (contract 7245) – contract for building maintenance of 942 community housing units across 90 sites. Initial contract term of 2 years, 7 months starting 1 December 2017. Three tenders received, with contract yet to be awarded.

·      Exterior Cleaning Services (contract 7304) – contract includes building washes, roof, gutter and window cleaning for 52 DCC buildings, excluding housing.   Initial contract term of 1 year, 7 months starting 1 December 2017. Four tenders received, with contract yet to be awarded.

22    Sprinkler upgrade 9 Heriot Drive, Porirua (contract 7213) – The upgrade works for building compliance purposes was awarded to Engie Services NZ Ltd with work beginning on the 21st September. It is anticipated the work will be completed by the end of 2017.  

23    Office fit-out 37 Treffers Road, Christchurch (contract 7094) – The contract for office fit-out was awarded to Cook Brothers Construction with the works expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

24    Programme of Building Assessments – There is a programme of building assessments being carried out which includes condition, asbestos and seismic assessments to inform future maintenance and capital works programmes.

·           Asbestos Management – Council Asbestos Policy is to be drafted, agreed, and in place by April 2018.  This has been progressed to a syndicated approach to tendering of asbestos survey works with the University of Otago and coordinating with the University’s Asbestos Management Group as to this process.

25    Civic Complex – The Better Business Case process is being used to develop the business case for refurbishment/redevelopment of the Civic Complex (Civic Centre and Library). The first workshop was held on the 19th September and second workshop scheduled for the 4th October.

26    Sammy’s Building – Building is undergoing a “mothballing” exercise until such time as a longer term development is decided upon.  The building has been made secure and is undergoing electrical safety works.  Roof works options are being explored to protect the decorative ceiling from water ingress, the Programme team is taking advice from structural consultants on the safest way to undertake works considering the poor structure of the building fabric.

 

 

 

 

27    Major Projects summary:

Name

Estimate

Actual to date*

Status

Civic Complex Business Case

To be confirmed

-

Scoping

Sammy’s Building (roof works)

To be confirmed

-

Scoping

Asbestos Management

$1,500,000.00

-

Underway

37 Treffers Road office Fit-out

$211,000.00

$62,853.00

Underway

9 Heriot Drive Sprinkler Upgrade

$650,000.00

$57,952.00

Underway

*Figures are as at 30th September 2017

OPTIONS

28    As this is an update report, there are no options.

NEXT STEPS

29    Areas of focus for the next quarter will be:

 

a)     Preparing for the Long Term Plan

b)     Further recruitment in key areas of Property Services

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Hayley Knight - Business Performance Coordinator/PA

Daniel Cook - Consultant

Authoriser:

Laura McElhone  - Group Manager - Property Services

Ruth Stokes - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing local infrastructure that is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Property Services activities support the outcomes of a number of strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

The Property Services team actively contributes positively to the interest of the community by providing and maintaining property required for a wide range of community, housing, Council operations, arts and culture, sport, and heritage service purposes.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy

Property Services activities are included in the Long Term Plan.

Financial considerations

The updates reported are within existing operating and capital budgets.

Significance

This decision is considered of low significance under the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement - external

As an update report no external engagement has been undertaken.

Engagement – internal

As an update report no internal engagement has been undertaken.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety / Conflict of Interest etc.

There are no identified risks.

Community Boards

Not applicable.

 


Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee

16 October 2017

 

 

Items for consideration by the Chair