Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                             Monday 11 December 2017

Time:                            9.00 am

Venue:                          Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers,

                                      The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Chris Staynes

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Damian Newell

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Cr Kate Wilson

 

 

Senior Officer                               Sue Bidrose, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer      Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

Lynne Adamson

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Lynne.Adamson@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Public Forum                                                                                             4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5   

Minutes of Committees

5          Council - 28 November 2017                                                                       21

6        Community and Culture Committee - 21 November 2017                                 22

7        Planning and Environment Committee - 21 November 2017                              23

8        Economic Development Committee - 21 November 2017                                  24

9        Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee - 21 November 2017     25

10      Bylaws Subcommittee - 6 November 2017                                                    26

11      Hearings Committee - 13 November 2017                                                     27

Minutes of Community Boards

12        Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 27 September 2017                                28

13      Otago Peninsula Community Board - 28 September 2017                                 29

14      Strath Taieri Community Board - 28 September 2017                                      30

15      Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board - 4 October 2017                                          31

16      West Harbour Community Board - 4 October 2017                                          32

17      Saddle Hill Community Board - 5 October 2017                                               33

Reports

18        Annual Report to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority                        34

19      Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy                                                       58

20      Update on Housing Report                                                                          86

21      Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Project Advisory Panel                                               91

22      Submission to Remuneration Authority - Part Three Consultation                       95

23      Speed Limits Bylaw 2004 - Amendment 8                                                    133               

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                           183

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

1     Public Forum

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Councillor Register of Interest

7

  



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Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a staff member and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Staff members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Executive Leadership Team's Interest Register attached as Attachment A;

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

ELT Register of Interest

17

  



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Minutes of Committees

Council - 28 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the minutes of the Council meeting held on 28 November 2017:   

b)     Takes Part C items of the minutes of the Council held on Tuesday, 28 November 2017, in the non-public part of the meeting.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Council held on 28 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Community and Culture Committee - 21 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Community and Culture Committee meeting held on 21 November 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Community and Culture Committee held on 21 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Planning and Environment Committee - 21 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Planning and Environment Committee meeting held on 21 November 2017

b)     Takes Part C items of the minutes of the Planning and Environment Committee held on Tuesday, 21 November 2017, in the non-public part of the meeting.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Planning and Environment Committee held on 21 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Economic Development Committee - 21 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Economic Development Committee meeting held on 21 November 2017

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Economic Development Committee held on 21 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee - 21 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee meeting held on 21 November 2017

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee held on 21 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Bylaws Subcommittee - 6 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Bylaws Subcommittee (Speed Limit Bylaw 2004 – Amendment 8) meeting held on 6 November 2017

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Bylaws Subcommittee held on 6 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Hearings Committee - 13 November 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Hearings Committee (Local Easter Sunday Trading Policy) meeting held on 13 November 2017

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Hearings Committee held on 13 November 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

   


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Minutes of Community Boards

Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 27 September 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting held on 27 September 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Waikouaiti Coast Community Board held on 27 September 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Otago Peninsula Community Board - 28 September 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Otago Peninsula Community Board meeting held on 28 September 2017

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Otago Peninsula Community Board held on 28 September 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Strath Taieri Community Board - 28 September 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes Part A the minutes of the Strath Taieri Community Board meeting held on 28 September 2017

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Strath Taieri Community Board held on 28 September 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board - 4 October 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board meeting held on 4 October 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board held on 4 October 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

West Harbour Community Board - 4 October 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the West Harbour Community Board meeting held on 4 October 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of West Harbour Community Board held on 4 October 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Saddle Hill Community Board - 5 October 2017

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Saddle Hill Community Board meeting held on 5 October 2017

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Saddle Hill Community Board held on 5 October 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

   


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Reports

 

Annual Report to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority

Department: Customer and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1      Section 199 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 requires every Territorial Authority to prepare and send to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority a report on the proceedings and operations of its District Licensing Committee within three months after the end of the financial year.

2      This report covers the proceedings and operations of the Dunedin District Licensing Committee for the financial year ending 30 June 2017.

3      The report was sent to the Authority within the statutory time of three months from the end of the reporting year.  In future, the Annual Report will be submitted to the Council for information prior to being sent to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the report from the Secretary of the Dunedin District Licensing Committee dated 25 August 2017.

 

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Kevin Mechen - Secretary, District Licensing Committee

Authoriser:

Adrian Blair - Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Annual Report to ARLA for year ending 30 June 2017

36

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing a regulatory function and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Alcohol licensing contributes to the “healthy and safe people” strategic direction of the Social Wellbeing Strategy and the Economic Development Strategy.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications for the LTP, Financial Strategy or Infrastructure Strategy.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.

Significance

THis report is considered low in terms of the Councils Significance and Engagement Policy. 

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified legal or health and safety risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no known conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

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Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

Department: Customer and Regulatory Services and Corporate Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The 2016 Amendment to the Shop Trading Hours Act 1990 allows a territorial authority to create a local policy to allow Easter Sunday shop trading in its area.  If adopted, an Easter Sunday shop trading policy allows shops to open, however shops cannot open to trade on Easter Sunday unless a policy is adopted. 

2      This report attaches the findings of the Hearings Committee (Attachment A) which, in November, considered all submissions of the special consultative procedure used to consult with the community during September. 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the recommendations of the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy Hearings Committee.

b)     Adopts a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy with the date of effect 1 January 2018 so that any type of shop may trade on Easter Sunday (Attachment C to this report).

i)      Decides to schedule a review of the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy to begin 90 days after Tuesday 3 April 2018.

ii)     Writes to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment requesting that advertising is undertaken to increase awareness of employers’ statutory obligations for offering employees work on Easter Sunday.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Shop Trading Hours Act 1990 (the Act) was amended in 2016 to enable territorial authorities to decide whether to have a policy to allow all types of shops to trade on Easter Sunday.  A policy could be applied to parts of a district or the whole district.

4      The Otago Chamber of Commerce asked the Council to consider the introduction of an Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy in July 2017.  Some pre-engagement consultation was carried out to ascertain the issues for consideration.

5      Without a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading policy only pharmacies, restaurants, souvenir shops and garden centres are able to trade.  Licensed premises (including restaurants) are also able to trade on Easter Sunday, however they are subject to restrictions imposed by the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 limiting the sale of alcohol to people present on premises for the purpose of dining.

6      The introduction of an Easter Sunday Trading Policy does not compel businesses to open on Easter Sunday however it gives them the option to trade should they wish to do so.

7      Mandatory opening provisions in shop leases may not be interpreted as requiring a shop to trade on Easter Sunday (unless it is the type of lease for which there is a specified exception in the Act). 

8      Shop employees are able to refuse to work on Easter Sunday and employers must not compel or treat shop employees adversely if they refuse to work on Easter Sunday.

9      Local Easter Sunday Trading Policies cannot override trading provisions in other legislation, or define specific opening hours or restrict the types of shops that may open.  Restrictions already in place pursuant to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 are not changed by the adoption of a Local Easter Sunday Trading Policy.

DISCUSSION

10    In August 2017 the Council approved the draft Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy for the purpose of consultation.  This was carried out in September 2017 using the special consultative procedure, as specified by the Act.

11    A hearings committee was established to hear submitters and recommend to Council whether or not to adopt a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy.

Results of consultation

12    There were 181 submissions on the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy. Of these, approximately 42 were from organisation representatives such as retail and business, as well as from unions.  The remainder were from individuals.

13    Results of the consultation were split between those wanting to retain the status quo of not allowing shops within the DCC district to open on Easter Sundays (54%) and those wanting to allow all shops to open on Easter Sundays (44%).  Two percent selected the option of allowing shops within certain defined geographic areas of the DCC district to open.

14    Key issues raised by those who wished to retain the status quo included (in order of frequency and as stated by submitters):

·           Guaranteed day off on Easter Sunday is important for family, community and health

·           "Protect retail staff who would still feel compelled to work"

·           "Special religious day that should remain a holiday"

·           People will continue to manage their shopping around the holiday

·           "Legally it’s a trading holiday not a public holiday" – if allowed to trade people rostered on that day would not be entitled to time and a half plus a day in lieu as they would be with public holidays

·           Allowing trading would disproportionately affect low income earners and single parent families.

15    Key issues raised by those who wished to allow all shops to open on Easter Sundays included (in order of frequency):

·           Retailers should be allowed to choose whether they trade on Easter Sundays

·           Trading should not be "limited by religion"

·           Trading will improve the availability of service in Dunedin for customers, including visitors and tourists

·           Trading will benefit Dunedin economically and "the city will be more progressive"

·           The three Ed Sheeran concerts are a good reason to trade on the Easter Sunday and trading will make the weekend more enjoyable and manageable

16    See Attachment D for a summary analysis of submissions that was considered by the Hearings Committee.

17    If a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy is not adopted, Council may consider whether it wants to adopt a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy at any future time.  The Act requires that Council use the special consultative procedure in making any future decision.  This means that the Council must invite comments on a proposed policy and hold hearings.

18    If a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy is adopted, the Act requires that the policy is reviewed within five years of its adoption.  The Council can review its decision at any earlier time.  The Council must use the special consultative procedure.  A review after one year will ensure that views are captured immediately after the experience of Easter 2018, and this can guide future decisions on Easter Sunday Trading.

19    The Committee wishes a review of the policy to begin 90 days after Easter Tuesday. The review will specifically aim to gather feedback from shop employees and unions regarding any concerns that arose at Easter 2018 about employees feeling compelled to work even though they are protected by legislation. Additionally, the review will examine the views of employers. All submitters to the draft Local Easter Sunday Trading Policy will be contacted to invite their views as well as the wider community.

OPTIONS

20    If the Council does not adopt a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy, only those shops currently permitted to trade under the exceptions in the Shop Trading Hours Act 1990 are permitted to trade on Easter Sunday. 

21    Adopting the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy will permit shops of all types to trade on Easter Sunday.

Option One - Adopt the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

22    Adopting the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy will allow all shops within the Dunedin City Council district to trade on Easter Sunday.

Advantages

·           Retailers are able to choose whether they trade on Easter Sunday

·           Allows a greater range and availability of services for concert attendees during Easter 2018

·           Potential economic benefits for Dunedin during Easter 2018 due to large numbers of visitors

·           Potential for Dunedin’s reputation to be enhanced during Easter 2018

·           Opportunity for employees who wish to work

·           Opportunities for all retailers to seek trade

Disadvantages

·           Loss of a guaranteed day off for employees may impact negatively on family, community and health of those who choose to work

·           Staff may still feel compelled to work even though they are protected by legislation and this may disproportionally affect low income earners and single parent families

·           Religious significance of Easter Sunday is no longer marked with restrictions on trading.

Option Two - Do not adopt the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy - Status Quo

23    The Council would not adopt the policy and only those shops that come within the exceptions within the Act will be permitted to trade on Easter Sunday.

Advantages

·           Retain Easter Sunday as a guaranteed day off for employees in shops that are not currently permitted to trade, which is an important benefit for family, community and health

·           Religious significance of Easter Sunday is marked with a trading holiday.

Disadvantages

·           Retailers are unable to choose whether to trade on Easter Sunday

·           Economic benefits and the availability of customer service for visitors during Easter 2018 are limited to shops that can currently trade.

NEXT STEPS

24    If the Council adopts the recommended option, next steps will be to:

·           Notify the public of the Council's decision on the proposed Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

·           Write to the MBIE requesting that advertising is undertaken to increase awareness of employers’ statutory obligations for offering employees work on Easter Sunday

·           Request the Chamber of Commerce and the Otago Southland Employers’ Association to develop best practice guidelines for engaging with employees about working on Easter Sunday

·           Take any other steps necessary for the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy to come into effect on 1 January 2018

·           Schedule a review of the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy to begin 90 days after Easter Tuesday 2018.  Under the Act, the review must be undertaken using the Special Consultative Procedure, with the public invited to make submissions and be heard on their submission.

 

Signatories

Author:

Adrian Blair - Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services

Anne Gray - Policy Analyst

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Hearings Committee report to Council on Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

65

b

Hearings Committee impact assessment of Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

69

c

Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

76

d

Summary of Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy submissions

78

e

Hearings Committee Minutes November 2017

80

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to providing a regulatory function and is considered good quality and cost effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Easter Sunday trading contributes to the business vitality and compelling destination priorities of the Economic Development Strategy. It both contributes and detracts from the standard of living and vibrant and cohesive communities priorities of the Social Wellbeing Strategy.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no specific implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications for the LTP, Annual Plan, Financial Strategy or Infrastructure Strategy.

Financial considerations

There may be costs associated with advertising the extent of trading.

Significance

The significance of a decision relating to a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy is considered medium – high in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy with regard to community interest and involvement.

Engagement – external

The community was engaged using the special consultative procedure. There were 181 submissions from organisations and individuals. Pre consultation feedback was also sought from Otago Chamber of Commerce, the People’s Panel, Combined Christian Groups Ministry Support Group, The Catholic Institute, First Union and the Council of Trade Unions Otago Affiliate.

Engagement - internal

The relevant Council departments have contributed to the advice provided to the Hearings Committee and to this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no known conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no specific implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

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Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Update on Housing Report

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an update on development of a housing report to Council in time for the 10 Year Plan. 

2      In May 2017 staff were asked to provide a report on progress in delivering its Social Housing Strategy 2010-2020 and the resourcing required to deliver it through the Long Term Plan 2018/19.

3      Following further discussions staff were asked to widen the scope of the report to address broader housing issues already being experienced within the city i.e. challenges in provision of emergency housing, affordable housing and healthy housing.

4      To meet the report scope staff are progressing establishment of a multi-sector Mayor’s Taskforce for Housing (the Taskforce) of external experts to provide strategic recommendations to Council.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the update on development of a housing report to Council.

 

 

BACKGROUND

5      Council currently has a Social Housing Strategy 2010 – 2020. Under this Council provides community housing (900 plus units primarily for people aged 55 years), and support through community grants to some organisations providing social or emergency housing.  Council is the second largest housing provider in Dunedin.

6      The Cosy Homes Trust estimates that through locally and nationally funded schemes more than 12,000 homes in the city (25%) have been insulated since 2009. Council supports home insulation within the city through the Warm Dunedin programme for rate payers. It also provides annual grants to the Cosy Homes Trust to contribute to home insulation initiatives.

7      Housing was identified as a key priority within the Social Wellbeing Strategy 2013 – 2023 (Priority 5.1 Dunedin people live in warm and healthy homes and Priority 5.2 Affordable housing options are available to all)  However, to date there is no broad longer term housing plan in place for the city.

8      The need for such a plan has been identified both within and outside Council due to a number of factors.

9      Housing affordability is currently a nationwide issue and while Dunedin is not facing the crisis situation of Auckland or Queenstown, low income residents report it is increasingly difficult to attain home ownership.

10    Population growth is not a current issue but could be in the future. Projections made in 2009 estimated the city’s population would rise by 4.4% between 2011 and 2031 to 130,000. However, projections were made prior to a number of key events; changes in international governments and economies, an explosion in the Auckland housing market, planned construction within the city and the city’s status as a Refugee Resettlement Centre. It may be that the 4.4% projected increase is therefore a conservative estimate.

11    Dunedin is also challenged by current housing issues, including a reasonably high percentage of old, cold homes. A lack of emergency and social housing to meet increasing demand is resulting in a growing number of homeless people. If unaddressed, these challenges will impact the city both economically and socially.

12    Central government priorities to improve housing are yet to be actioned.

DISCUSSION

13    In providing a report to Council staff considered contracting an independent expert to undertake engagement with the wider housing sector within the city, and provide recommendations.  Another approach was to bring together stakeholders in a multi-sector group to work collaboratively on developing recommendations. It was decided the latter approach was the preferred option.

14    Staff are therefore working to establish a multi-sector Mayor’s Taskforce for Housing to contribute its expertise to a housing report for Council. The Taskforce will be established on a fixed term basis and chaired by a Councillor.

15    The Taskforce will comprise representatives from the social housing, property development, central government sectors as well as Kai Tahu.  This approach provides engagement with, and contribution by, experts and partners specialising in housing and housing provision.

16    The role of the Taskforce is to provide Council with a set of recommendations to achieve the housing related outcomes set out within the Council’s strategies and plans. To achieve these, the Taskforce will take into account planned central government strategies to improve the quality and quantity of housing.

17    An internal cross-Council Housing Group is being brought together to provide data, information and support to the Taskforce. 

18    It’s planned the Taskforce will be established in February 2018, and expected that a set of recommendations will be brought to Council for consideration in May 3018.

OPTIONS

There are no options.  The report is for noting.

 

 

 

NEXT STEPS

19    Staff will continue to work on the establishment of the Mayor’s Taskforce for Housing with the aim that a report with recommendations is provided to Council in May 2018.

 

Signatories

Author:

Joy Gunn - Manager Events and Community Development

Authoriser:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision/report/proposal enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Dunedin City Social Housing Strategy 2010 – 2020

Second Generation Plan

Destination Plan

 

Māori Impact Statement

Representation of Kai Tahu on the Mayor’s Taskforce for Housing would be desired.  Research shows that Maori are more disadvantaged than non-Maori in attaining home ownership due to income levels. Dunedin has a young Maori population, and if that population were to remain in the city, this may result in a different trend in housing within the next two decades

Sustainability

Adequate, healthy, affordable housing contributes to the city’s social and economic wellbeing. 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

It’s expected recommendations would be provided to Council for consideration in May 2018.  Until that time, current service levels would be maintained.

Financial considerations

The development of the housing report, and establishment of the Mayors Taskforce for Housing can be achieved within operational budgets.

Significance

This matter is considered of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy at this time.

Engagement – external

To date Council staff have engaged with central government organisations, and other Councils that have taken a similar approach to long term housing plans.

Engagement - internal

Community Development staff have engaged with staff from Property, Policy, Resoruce Consents and City Development around this work.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

No risks have been identified.

Conflict of Interest

No conflict of interest has been identified.

Community Boards

There are no known implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Project Advisory Panel

Department: Civic and Legal

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report proposes the establishment of the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Project Advisory Panel (the Advisory Panel). 

2      The purpose of the Advisory Panel is to provide stakeholder direction to the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility project by co-ordinating the efforts of stakeholders for the delivery of the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the establishment of the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Advisory Panel

b)     Appoints six members to the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Advisory Panel as follows:

i)      Economic Development Committee Chair (Chairperson)

ii)     Infrastructure Services and Network Committee Deputy Chair

iii)    Planning and Environment Committee Deputy Chair

iv)    Taieri Community Facilities Trust Representative – Irene Moseley

v)     Taieri Community Facilities Trust Representative – Bill Feather

vi)    Taieri Community Facilities Trust Representative – Martin Dillon

 

BACKGROUND

3      After considering the submissions to the Annual Plan in 2015, the Council resolved to support in principle the development of a new aquatic facility for Dunedin in Mosgiel and to include a placeholder of $6 million for funding of this project in the 2018-19 financial year.

DISCUSSION

4      The Taieri Facilities Trust and Council staff have been progressing the preliminary work for this project.

5      An Advisory Panel will provide stakeholder feedback at various stages of the project.  The proposed panel is to comprise three elected members and three representatives recommended by the Taieri Community Facilities Trust.  The membership of the Advisory Panel is set out in the attached terms of reference.

6      Including an Advisory Panel into the project governance structure is expected to streamline consultation and engagement, with each key stakeholder representative on the Advisory Panel given the mandate to advise the project team in relation to facility design and operation as well as providing support to funding initiatives and keeping the community informed about the project.

7      It is envisaged that the Advisory Panel will initially meet quarterly in the first year and then on an as required basis.

8      The Advisory Panel may wish to invite other attendees from time to time to assist with detailed project governance matters.  Attendees from outside the membership will be confirmed through the Chair in advance of the meeting.

9      The Advisory Panel will not have any formal delegations and all formal decision and approvals will be completed by the Council and staff in accordance with existing delegations.

OPTIONS

10    Council could choose not to constitute the Mosgiel Aquatic Advisory Panel, in which case the status quo arrangements would remain and stakeholder feedback would be provided through existing channels.

NEXT STEPS

11    If the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Advisory Panel is constituted then the members will be advised.

12    The first meeting of the Mosgiel Aquatic Facility Advisory Panel will be scheduled by staff early in 2018.

 

Signatories

Author:

Kristy Rusher - Manager Civic and Legal

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference

93

 

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

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11 December 2017

 

 

 

Submission to Remuneration Authority - Part Three Consultation

Department: Civic and Legal

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The Remuneration Authority (the Authority) is currently reviewing various aspects of remuneration for Local Government elected members.  The authority is in the third and final stage of its consultation and review of remuneration matters. 

2      This report presents a draft submission for Part Three of the consultation for Councillor's consideration.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the proposed submission to the Remuneration Authority.

b)     Authorises the Mayor to make the submission on behalf of Council.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Authority is an independent body that sets remuneration rates for local body elected members.  The Authority issues an annual determination that sets the level of remuneration and details various allowances and rates that apply in specific circumstances.

4      In advance of issuing a new determination, the Authority is seeking feedback from Council and Community Boards on a number of matters and this report presents a suggested Council response to each of the matters raised by the Authority.

5      The Consultation Document issued by the Authority (Attachment A) is broken into three parts.  This submission relates to Part Three.  The submission period closes on 14 December 2017 (note that the consultation document does not refer to the correct date as the submission period has been extended).

DISCUSSION

6      For each of the consultation questions, the Authority has provided commentary in the consultation document.  This commentary is included as Attachment B and has not been restated in the body of this report.

7      Councillors attended a workshop to consider what comments should be included in the submission. 

8      These comments have been included in the proposed submission with the questions asked by the Authority restated and followed by a proposed response from the Council. 

OPTIONS

9      Council needs to consider the submission issues outlined by the Authority and decide the final form and content of the submission it wishes to make.  It is also open to Council to decide not to make a submission.  As making a submission is an administrative function, it is not necessary to include the advantages or disadvantages of this decision.

10    If it Council does wish to make a submission then it is recommended that the Mayor be authorised to submit the response on behalf of Council.

NEXT STEPS

11    Once Council determines its view on the proposed response, staff will formalise the response in a letter to the Authority and submit by the due date of 14 December 2017.

 

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Kristy Rusher - Manager Civic and Legal 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Remuneration Authority Consultation Document

98

b

Proposed Submission for Consideration

128

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities by informing the Remuneration Authority of Council's views and preferences on the topic of remuneration.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Councillor remuneration is an administrative decision made by an independent authority.  It is not connected to the strategic framework.

 

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

Any changes made by the Authority will be reflected in operating budgets.

Significance

The matter is of low significance when assessed against the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

Councillors have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest

Community Boards

Community Boards were consulted on the preparation of a submission.  Community Boards have made a separate submission on matters of interest to them.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

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Council

11 December 2017

 

 

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Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Speed Limits Bylaw 2004 - Amendment 8

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report recommends that Council amends the Speed Limits Bylaw 2004 by making Amendment 8 as recommended by the Bylaws Subcommittee with date of effect from 1 February 2018.

2      The amendment proposes lower permanent speed limits on the following roads in Dunedin:

a)     The Esplanade, St Clair

b)     Forbury Road, St Clair

c)     Wingatui Road, Mosgiel

d)     Gladstone Road North, Mosgiel.

3      This report attaches the findings of the Bylaws Subcommittee (Attachment A) which considered all the submissions received during the special consultative procedure process used to consult with the community in October 2017.

4      The Bylaw Subcommittee further recommended three additional items for future consideration by the Council. These are:

a)     the addition of a lower permanent speed limit of 50 km/hour for Smart Street as part of Amendment 8;

b)     the need to address parking concerns along Wingatui Road;

c)     the lack of pedestrian facilities in this section of Wingatui Road.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the Bylaws Subcommittee’s recommendation to amend Council’s Speed Limit Bylaw 2004.

b)     Adopts Amendment 8, to the Speed Limits Bylaw 2004.

c)     Decides that the Speed Limits Bylaw 2004 – Amendment 8 will take effect from 1 February 2018.

d)     Notes that staff will monitor and evaluate three recommendations made by the Bylaws Subcommittee in addition to the recommendation to amend the Speed Limit Bylaw 2004.

 

BACKGROUND

5      A speed limit review was undertaken in accordance with Land Transport Rule 54001: Setting of Speed Limits 2003 (the Rule) as was legally required.

6      The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 came into force on 21 August 2017, shortly after the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee approved the Statement of Proposal for Amendment 8 to be publicly notified using special consultative procedure.

7      New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) is supportive of proceeding with Amendment 8 under the old rule (2003), if it is clear that the speed limit changes proposed are not controversial and are supported by the principles set out in the new Speed Management Guide.

8      Speed limit reviews have been ‘on hold’ pending changes by NZTA in the approach to speed management.

9      The new approach to speed management is outlined in the Speed Management Guide, which was released in November 2016, with a roll out of workshops for road controlling authorities in March 2017.

10    Under the Rule (2003), the proposed speed limits for the four roads took into account the level of development, the speed environment, consistency with surrounding roads, safety and use.  This approach is consistent with the NZ Government’s past position for speed limits to ‘reflect the use, function and safety of the network’.  Attachment B summarises the process used.

11    Speed Limits Bylaw 2004 - Amendment 8 was publicly notified from 18 September to 20 October 2017.  The documents that formed the basis of the public consultation are found in Attachments C-F and consist of:

a)     Public Notice

b)     Tables of the proposed speed limit changes

c)     Maps of proposed speed limit changes

d)     Statement of Proposal

DISCUSSION

12    A total of 23 submissions were received during consultation.  Twenty-one (21) indicated full support, one partial support, and one opposed to the proposed changes.  A summary of the submissions is included in Attachment G.

13    Two submitters wished to be heard in support of the speed limit changes.  One was in support on the proposed changes to The Esplanade and Forbury Road, with the other in support of lower speed limits in general.

14    One submitter opposed changes to Wingatui Road and two submitters requested two roads accessing Wingatui Road to be considered for lower speed limits.

15    Recommended responses to the additional roads for consideration can be found in Table 2.

Table 1: Summary of additional roads to consider in future

Road

Concern

(number submitters with concern)

Response

 

White Hart Lane

Would like to see the speed limit reduced to 20 km/h as kids play in the street (1).

Under the new Speed Management Guide, residential roads would not be lowered to 20 km/h. However, it is noted and will consider the application of lower speed limits in residential areas citywide.

Smart Street

Would like to see the speed limit reduced to 50 km/h (1).

Agree with the addition of a lower permanent speed limit of 50 km/hour for Smart Street, however this street did not form part of the statement of proposal, there was no opportunity to receive public consultation on a proposed amendment. Will have to form part of a future review.

16    In addition, some submitters raised other issues, recommended responses to which are summarised in Table 3.

Table 2: Other concerns raised

Road

Concern

(number submitters with concern)

Response

 

The Esplanade, St Clair

Further encouragement for pedestrian-priority improvements in the greater area (2)

Safety of all road users is supported by the Transport Strategy and safety improvements for pedestrians are being rolled out citywide each year.

The Esplanade, St Clair

First choice is for a totally pedestrianised St Clair Esplanade (1).

Noted and will be considered in future reviews of urban centres. The lowering of speed limits is expected to improve safety for all road users.

Wingatui Road, Mosgiel

Road too narrow for parking (2)

Once the speed limit is changed, the impact will be monitored. If required, short or long term speed management techniques will be introduced.

Wingatui Road

No safe area for cyclists and horses.

The lower speed limit will change the road environment for all road users.

Wingatui Road, Mosgiel

Footpath not completed.

A formal footpath was constructed along the frontage of the Highland Park subdivision built by Council and funded through developer contributions. A gravel path has been constructed north to Factory Road and south to Gladstone Road North providing a path on the west side of Wingatui Road. The only missing link is at the bridge where there were construction constraints.

Submissions – Specific Roads

17    The submissions showed a high level of support for lower speed limits on each road. The discussion below considers submissions for each road and makes recommendations concerning the proposed speed limits. In the tables below speed limits is abbreviated to SL, and ‘extend’ means extend the proposed speed limit over a greater length.

18    The proposal is to reduce the speed limit on two low access roads through an urban centre (St Clair Esplanade) from 50km/h to 30 km/h to match operating speeds and high concentration of active road users. Table 4 discusses the submissions for each road.

Table 3: Low access roads through Dunedin’s urban centres reduce to 30km/h

Road

Request

(No. requesting)

Staff comment

1   The Esplanade, St Clair

 

2   Forbury Road (Victoria Road to the Esplanade)

 

Submissions

7

Opposition

0

Support

7

Hearing (in support)

2

Want 30 km/h (6)

 

Support lower speed limits in general(1)

Full support, no opposition, one request for a totally pedestrianised St Clair Esplanade as first choice.

19    The proposal is to reduce the speed limit on Wingatui Road (from 100 m south of Factory Road to Gladstone Road North) and Gladstone Road North (from 100 m north of Wingatui Road to 50/70 sign 165 m south of Wingatui Road) from 70km/h to 50 km/h in keeping with the urban development and road environment of these roads, noting all side roads are 50 km/h. Table 5 discusses the submissions.

Table 4: Urban Expansion in East Mosgiel - reduce speed limit to 50 km/h

Road

Request

(No.  requesting) 

Staff comment

3   Wingatui Road, Mosgiel

 

4   Gladstone Road North, Mosgiel

Submissions

19

Support

17

Partly

1

Opposition

1

Want 50 km/h (13)

 

Support lower speed limits in general (1)

Majority support, one opposed, one partly support with request for 20 km/h in White Hart Lane.

Summary of Recommended Changes to the Proposed Bylaw

20    Having considered the submissions, it is recommended the speed limits be revised as set out in Table 5.

Table 5: Revised Road Speed Limits

Road

Speed  Limit

Speed Limit rationale

Current

Proposed

Revised

Shared use reserve roads – Proposal reduce speed limit to 30 km/h to match operating speeds and use 

1   The Esplanade (Forbury Road to Beach Road)

50

30

30

Speed reflects road environment and road use.

2   Forbury Road

(Victoria Road to the Esplanade)

50

30

30

Speed reflects road environment and road use.

Urban expansion in East Mosgiel - reduce speed limit to 50 km/h to match urbanisation

3   Wingatui Road

(100m south of Factory Road to Gladstone Road North)

70

50

50

Speed reflects urban environment

4   Gladstone Road North Wingatui Road

(100 m east of Wingatui Road to 165 m west of Wingatui Road (50/70 sign) and 90 m east of Gladstone Road split (to No. 214)

70

50

50

Speed reflects urban environment

OPTIONS

Option One – Recommended Option

21    The recommended option is to proceed with the permanent speed limit changes to the following four roads as proposed, with the addition of Smart Street;

a)     The Esplanade, St Clair

b)     Forbury Road, St Clair

c)     Wingatui Road, Mosgiel

d)     Gladstone Road North, Mosgiel

Advantages

·           Speed in affected areas will be reduced, which will improve safety for all road users.

·           The speed limit changes that are recommended in this report are appropriate for the roadside environment.

·           Speed limit changes will not be delayed or caught up as part of the transition to the new speed management approach.

Disadvantages

·           There are no identified disadvantages.

Option Two – Status Quo

22    The status quo would be to leave these speed limits unchanged and wait to review under the new Speed management Guide which recommends an alternative engagement process.

Advantages

·           Speed limit reviews would be prioritised using an alternative evidence-based approach.

·           The new process for speed limit reviews includes earlier engagement and collaboration with community and stakeholders.

Disadvantages

·           Delays in speed limit changes would mean speed limits in the identified road sections of Wingatui Road and Gladstone Road North would not fit the changed road environment.

NEXT STEPS

23    Once the recommended amendment to the Bylaw has been made by Council, the amended version of the Speed Limits Bylaw 2004 must be sent to the NZTA and NZ Police at least 14 days prior to it coming into effect.

24    In conjunction with this, staff will arrange for the changes in speed limit to be publicised, and the necessary changes in signage to be implemented.

25    Staff will monitor and evaluate the three further recommendations made by the Bylaws Subcommittee in addition to the recommendation to adopt amendment 8 to the Speed Limit Bylaw 2004.

 

Signatories

Author:

Lisa Clifford - Senior Transportation Engineer

Authoriser:

Stacey Hitchcock - Business Administrator Transport

Nick Sargent - Transport Strategy Manager

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Bylaw Subcommittee Recommendations

141

b

Summary of Speed Limit Determination Methods, Roads

143

c

Public Notice (as consulted)

144

d

Table of Proposed Speed Limit Changes (as consulted)

145

e

Maps of Proposed Speed Limit Changes (as consulted)

148

f

Statement of Proposal

151

g

Summary of Submissions

180

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This proposal relates to providing a regulatory function and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Ensuring Dunedin is a safe city which is prioritised in the Social Wellbeing Strategy, Spatial Plan and Long term Plan as well as the Integrated Transport Strategy. Safer speeds is one of the four pillars under the Safe Systems approach to reduce the number of fatal and serious injury crashes occurring on Dunedin’s road network.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

No implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

No implications for the above plans and strategies

Financial considerations

The financial cost for the recommended option is minimal and can be covered through the current road maintenance contract.

Significance

There is community interest in making the changes identified in Amendment 8 regarding road safety.

The matter is considered of medium significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy

Engagement – external

External engagement has occurred with affected parties and key stakeholders on the proposed speed limit changes through formal consultation. Affected parties included owner/occupiers along and in close proximity to the Esplanade, Forbury Road, Wingatui Road and Gladstone Road North. The key stakeholders were specifically asked for feedback: Mosgiel Taieri Community Board, NZ Transport Agency, NZ Police, NZ Fire, St John Ambulance, the Automobile Association, Otago Regional Council, Heavy Haulage, Road Transport Association NZ, SPOKES, VICTA, CCS Disability Action, Disabled Persons Assembly, the Blind Foundation and BRONZ. In addition, Well South Primary Health Network and Public Health South (SDHB) has given feedback.

Engagement - internal

Internal engagement has occurred with the appropriate persons in Transport, City Development, Parks and Recreation, and Waste and Environmental Solutions.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Risk of legal challenge if fail to follow the recommendations of the Bylaws hearings committee.

Conflict of Interest

No conflicts of interest have been identified.

Community Boards

The Mosgiel Taieri Community Board was consulted as two of the roads are within their area. They have provided feedback and support the proposed speed limit changes.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

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11 December 2017

 

 

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11 December 2017

 

 

Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

 

That the Council excludes the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting (pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987) namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

 

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Confirmation of  the Confidential Minutes of Council - 28 November 2017 - Public Excluded

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2  Confirmation of  the Confidential Minutes of Planning and Environment Committee - 21 November 2017 - Public Excluded

 

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C3  2017/18 Funding Matters

S7(2)(b)(ii)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C4  Director Re/appointments Group Companies

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

This report is confidential because the appointment of directors is made public once the applicants have been notified of the decision..

C5  Director Appointment Dunedin City Holdings Limited/Dunedin City Treasury Limited

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

This report is confidential because the appointment of director is made public once the applicant has been notified of the decision..

C6  Director Remuneration - Dunedin City Holdings Limited Group Companies

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S7(2)(b)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would disclose a trade secret.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 This report is confidential because the information contained in this report remains confidential until Council has determined the level of fees and advised the Dunedin City Holdings Limited of the outcome at which point the information can be made public..

C7  CEO Appraisal and Remuneration

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.