Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                             Monday 11 December 2017

Time:                            10.30 am or at the conclusion of the previous meeting whichever is later

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers,

                                      The Octagon Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council – 10 Year Plan

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Chris Staynes

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Damian Newell

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Cr Kate Wilson

 

 

Senior Officer                               Sue Bidrose, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer      Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

Lynne Adamson

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Lynne.Adamson@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Apologies                                                                                                  4

2        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

3        Overarching Resolution                                                                                4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5     

Reports

5          Investing in Our Great Small City - An Overview of the Draft Budgets                21

6        10 Year Plan - Engaging the community                                                        34

7        Three Waters - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                                            50

8        Three Waters Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                                                   61

9        Roading and Footpaths - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                                69

10      Roading and Footpaths Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                                       79

11      Reserves and Recreational Facilities - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget               87

12      Reserves and Recreational Facilities Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                    102

13      Property - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                                                 109

14      Property Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                                                        117

15      Libraries and Museums - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budgets                             125

16      Libraries and Museums Draft 10-year Capital Budget                                     136

17      Regulatory Services - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                                  143

18      Regulatory Services Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                                         160

19      Waste Management - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                                   167

20      Waste Management Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                                         176

21      Community and Planning - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budgets                           183

22      Community and Planning Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                                   195

23      Economic Development - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                              203

24      Governance and Support Services - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget                211

25      Governance and Support Services Draft 10-Year Capital Budget                      221

26      Capital Budget Option - City to Waterfront Connection                                    229

27      Capital Budget Option - Central City Plan                                                     237

28      Capital Budget Option - Tertiary Precinct                                                     245

29      Operating Budget Option - Encouraging Private Investment in Ecological Restoration 252

30      Operating Budget Option - Encouraging Private Investment in Heritage Building Restoration                                                                                            261

31      Operating Budget Option - Investing in Place Based Community Groups             271

32      10 Year Plan Third Round of Supporting Documents                                       279                

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

1     APOLOGIES

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2     Confirmation of agenda

To be moved:

 

That the Council:

 

Confirms the public part of the agenda with the following alterations:

-      In regard to Standing Order 2.1, Option C be adopted in relation to moving and seconding and speaking to amendments.”

 

3     OVERARCHING RESOLUTION

To be moved:

 

That the Council:

 

Notes that any resolution made in this section of the meeting may be subject to further discussion and decision by the meeting.”

 

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Councillor Register of Interest

7

  



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a staff member and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Staff members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Executive Leadership Team's Interest Register attached as Attachment A;

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

ELT Register of Interest

17

  



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator

   



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

Reports

 

Investing in Our Great Small City - An Overview of the Draft Budgets

Department: Office of the Chief Executive

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The 10 year plan, previously called the Long Term Plan or LTP, sets the direction for the DCC for the next 10 years. It sets out the services and activities we will provide, the projects we will carry out and the level of service the community can expect. The plan will also include how much we expect things to cost, how we’ll pay for them and what that means for rates and debt.

2      In the previous two 10 year plans, the Council focused on paying down debt, limiting rates increases and some limited investment and increases in levels of service.  We didn’t do many new things and we concentrated on getting our house in order and making sure we had the right structures in place.  This 10 year plan is different as we’ve built a strong foundation and we’re now in position to invest and do the things we’ve talked about for years. 

3      We have developed an ambitious 10 year plan for investing in Dunedin. If Councillors choose to do everything in the draft budgets, the total capital investment in our assets and infrastructure will be around $854 million over 10 years, and the total operating costs for providing our day-to-day services will be around $253 million in the next financial year.   

4      To pay for everything that’s currently included in the draft budgets, we will need to increase rates and raise more debt.  To make sure we don’t borrow too much, we’ll focus our investment in assets and infrastructure in Dunedin and sell assets that are outside of Dunedin.

5      The draft budgets are not final. Months will be devoted to Council consideration and community engagement.  We need to set out the important issues and choices facing the Council over the next 10 years and the Council’s preferred options.  Our community then gets to have their say on the options.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Investing in Our Great Small City – An Overview of the Draft Budgets Report.

 

 

BACKGROUND

6      The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the draft budgets and what’s included in the draft 10 year plan titled ‘Investing in our great small city.’ 

7      As part of developing the 10 year plan, the Council needs to develop a consultation document to provide an effective basis for public participation in the Council’s decision-making processes relating to the content of the 10 year plan. The consultation document needs to:

·           Provide a fair representation of what’s included in the draft budgets and the overall objectives of our proposals.

·           Describe how rates, debt, and levels of service might be affected by Council’s investment choices.

·           Identify and explain significant and important issues and choices facing the Council, and the consequences of those choices.

·           Include a summary of the financial strategy and infrastructure strategy.

8      The draft budgets are not final. At present if the Council chooses to do everything included in the draft budgets the outcomes would be:

·           An overall rate increase of 6.9% in 2018/19 and an average annual rate increase of 4.5% per year over the following nine years.

·           Over the 10 year period debt increases by $68 million and $63 million of assets will be sold to help fund the capital investment of $854 million. 

9      While the budget outcomes can change, the Council needs to meet the current and future needs of our community:

·           We need to invest in our infrastructure to improve residents’ safety, respond to the growth we are seeing in Dunedin and face climate change risk.

·           We provide a diverse range of social, cultural, economic and environmental services, and costs can’t be significantly reduced without reducing services.

·           We can be ambitious in the vision we have for Dunedin, but we must make sure we have the money and staff to actually get things done.

10    The Council approved the strategic significant forecasting assumptions for the 10 year plan on growth, demographics and climate change (and relevant supporting documents) on 30 May 2017.  It is important that these assumptions and their implications are considered when considering the draft budgets and content of the 10 year plan.

11    We are working to improve our understanding of natural hazards and to develop options for a resilient infrastructure network into the future.  Flooding, landslides, rising groundwater and liquefaction in the event of an earthquake pose the most significant risks to Dunedin’s infrastructure.  It is anticipated these risks will increase over time as a result of climate change.

DISCUSSION

The draft budgets

12    The draft operating budget for the next financial year (2018/19) provides for the day-to-day running of all the activities and services the Council provides such as cleaning the streets and mud tanks, mowing the lawns, checking buildings are safe, getting clean water to your house and taking it away and all the libraries and museums around the city. We are budgeting to spend $253 million in the next financial year.  The draft operating budget for the Council overall is provided at Attachment A.

13    The draft capital budget for the 10 year plan provides for replacing existing assets and infrastructure, meeting additional demand (including growth) and improving some levels of service. Across the Council’s activities, we are proposing to spend $854 million across the 10 years.  The draft capital budget for the Council overall is provided at Attachment B.

14    Each of the Council’s group of activities has developed a draft capital budget and draft operating budget.  The amount each group will receive from rates or other funding sources and the expected costs of delivery are explained in the Group operating budget reports and the proposed capital projects are explained in the Group capital budget reports.

15    There are three main themes in which the capital and operating costs can be clustered.

·           Investing in a bold vision for Dunedin.

·           Facing the true costs of great services.

·           Building our capacity to do more.

Investing in a bold vision for Dunedin

16    Now that the city’s strategic vision has been completed, the focus needs to be on delivery, which will also require adequate resourcing. We are already starting to see delivery on our Dunedin’s vision to be a great small city:

·           For the first time, in 2016 Dunedin residents rated their quality of life the highest of the seven New Zealand cities surveyed, while 85% of us said Dunedin is a great place to live.

·           Dunedin’s population increased by 1,800 in the year to June 2017 after a long period of low and at times negative growth.  Most of this growth was driven by people migrating to Dunedin from overseas.

·           Dunedin’s economy grew 2.4% in the year to June 2017, a higher rate of growth than over the previous decade.  Non-residential building activity doubled from $110 million in the year to June 2016 to $220 million in year to June 2017. 

·           Dunedin’s status as a UNESCO City of Literature is just one example of Dunedin’s creativity, and of Dunedin resuming its place as a national leader and a city of firsts. 

·           A pop-up community hub in South Dunedin has been established with an artist included in the project team that delivered beautiful outcomes.

·           Chinese international secondary and tertiary students contribute over $20 million a year into the Dunedin economy.

17    The draft 10 year plan prioritises investment which will build on our success to keep people in Dunedin and attract people of working age to the city. Some of the investment projects currently included in the draft budgets, along with alternative options in some cases, include:

·           Stormwater improvements and flood alleviation in South Dunedin and Mosgiel at a cost of $38 million.

·           A new city to waterfront connection at a cost of $20 million, as both a major architectural statement and a catalyst for the redevelopment of this important precinct.

·           Replacing and improving below and above ground infrastructure in the central city at a cost of $60 million.

·           Improving transport and amenity around the university and polytechnic at a cost of $11 million.

·           Providing for a range of projects and grants aimed at community initiatives, enhancing heritage and protecting biodiversity.

18    New capital expenditure represents 40% of the proposed 10-year capital budget. It is important to note that some of the new capital projects include a component of both renewals and growth.  In addition to the investment projects discussed above, other major new capital projects (projects $10 million or more) which accommodate for growth and/or increased levels of service include:

·           Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant of $44 million

·           Peninsula Connection of $44 million

·           Dunedin Urban Cycleways of $23 million

·           Minor Transport Improvements of $20 million

·           LED Streetlights of $12 million

Facing the true costs of great services

19    Overall resident satisfaction with the Council is as high as it has been at any time in the last 15 years.  Residents highly value the infrastructure, facilities and services we provide. However this has required extra staff and contract prices have also increased.

20    The draft operating budget shows increases in costs related to:

·           Personnel costs such as salaries, superannuation and training.

·           Operations and maintenance costs such as green space maintenance, sealed pavement maintenance, traffic management costs and mud tank waste disposal, compliance costs and reinstating roads. 

·           Occupancy and property-related costs such as rates, insurance, energy, water and property maintenance.

·           Consumables and general costs such as engineering, legal and general consultancy work to assess the condition of our assets, support coastal erosion and climate change work, and support us to deliver the proposed capital programme.

21    The draft operating budget includes an increase in full time equivalent staff of 28. The increased staffing addresses capacity issues and prepares the Council to deliver the capital programme.  We have also become more vigilant in making sure contractors do the work we pay them to do, which is one reason residents’ service satisfaction has increased, but has driven up costs.

22    Like many councils we have ageing infrastructure assets, such as water and wastewater pipes that need to be replaced and properties that must be maintained. Renewals expenditure represents 60% of the proposed 10 year capital budget.

23    The 10 year plan includes a statement of service provision for each group of activities which shows the intended levels of service and performance measures for the services, infrastructure and activities we provide for the community.

24    There are no significant changes to levels of services proposed in the draft budgets, although a number of existing levels of service will be improved by some of the budgeted and proposed projects.  We have suggested changes to some service level statements, measures and targets to help us be clearer about what the community can expect from us.  Details of the proposed changes are included in the Group operating budget reports.

Building our capacity to do more

25    In a recent report to Parliament on audits of local government, the Auditor-General noted some national trends and areas of focus for this round of 10 year plans, including:

·           Local authorities are carrying out substantially less work than budgeted, and will be encouraged to consider whether they are is underinvesting and if so the likely effect of that on service levels.

·           Local authorities need to focus on financial sustainability as they address changing demographics and infrastructure demands.

26    Our draft financial strategy and 50 year infrastructure strategy address these concerns in detail.  We propose to build on the commitment in our last 10 year plan to increase the rate at which we renew our network assets, as well as providing the new investments discussed aimed at attracting working age people to the city.    

27    We are increasing staffing, particularly in our infrastructure teams, to make sure we can give timely effect to capital projects included in the draft budgets. 

28    The draft budgets include the continuation of funding for some activities and projects that are focussed on delivering our strategies (eg. City of Literature, Te Ao Tūroa, Ara Toi, energy, food resilience).

Funding sources

29    As it currently stands, the draft budget results in a rates increase of 6.9% in the first year of the 10 year plan.  The average rate increase for the following years is 4.5%.

30    The draft budget shows an increase other revenue sources of $6 million in the first year of the 10 year plan.  This includes income from New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), landfills, property rental and recoveries, investment income as well as fees and charges.  It is important to note that the level of NZTA funding is expected to reduce over the ten years.

31    We’ve increased fees and charges by 4% where possible for the first year of the 10 year plan. There are exceptions to this and these exceptions, for example where the fee increase is driven by cost increases. Details of the proposed fees and charges are included and explained in the Group operating budget reports.

32    Throughout the 10 year plan, the Council will limit its debt to $285 million. This limit is consistent with the maximum debt level forecast in the previous 10 year plan ($255 million in 2015) adjusted for inflation. To make sure debt remains within the $285 million limit, the Council will focus on strategic investment in Dunedin, and will sell around $63 million assets that are not strategic including investment property located outside of Dunedin.  To deliver the capital programme, we will need to borrow $68 million more.

33    In the past, Council owned companies have delivered dividends which were used to offset rate increases.  That’s not currently the case, mainly because Aurora Energy is investing heavily in the safety and reliability of its electricity network.  The 10 year plan forecast assumes an income stream of $5.9 million each year from the Council owned companies, being interest on the shareholder advance.

Options for consultation

34    The consultation document will set out the important issues and choices and identify the Council’s preferred options.  All of the options have different levels of investment.  Our community then gets to have their say on the options and what level of investment they want.

35    The three capital budget option reports for Council’s consideration are:

·           city to waterfront connection

·           Central City Plan

·           Tertiary Precinct.

36    The three operating budget options reports for Council’s consideration are: 

·           ecological restoration

·           heritage restoration

·           place based groups.

NEXT STEPS

37    Over the next few days, the Council will be considering the 10 year plan budgets and options for investing in our city and deciding what will we will engage on with our community.  Early engagement has demonstrated that many people have clear and passionate views on the topics the Council will be discussing, and are keen to be part of this process.

 

Signatories

Author:

Tami  Sargeant  - Senior Policy Analyst

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Draft Budget

29

b

Draft Capital Budget

33

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the 10 year plan enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The 10 year plan contributes to all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities; the community outcomes; and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The 10 year plan provides a mechanism for Māori to contribute to local decision-making.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the 30 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides an update on the development of the 10 year plan 2018-28.

Financial considerations

The financial implications of the draft budgets are discussed in this report, as well as the Group budget reports and options reports.

Significance

The 10 year plan is considered to be of high significance.

Engagement – external

The content of the 10 year plan is of interest to the community and there will be extensive community engagement on the draft budgets and content of the 10 year plan in 2018.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets and options reports.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Refer to the group budget reports and options reports for specific risks considered in the development of the 10 year plan.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the 10 year plan; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


 


 


 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

10 Year Plan - Engaging the community

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report updates the Council on the plan for engaging with the community on the 10 Year Plan (the 2018/19 - 2027/28 Long Term Plan).

2      This report outlines the proposed approach, which is based on councillor direction that engagement be fresh, bold and accessible.

3      The plan builds on past community feedback about what works and will provide a broad range of opportunities, including some new elements, such as short video clips which can be shared on social media. Resources will be developed to help councillors, staff and the community get the messages out and ensure the feedback is captured.

4      A summary of feedback on community priorities from early engagement undertaken over the past year is also included for information.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the 10 Year Plan Community Engagement Plan; and,

b)     Notes the summary of information regarding community priorities received during pre-engagement opportunities over the past year.

 

 

BACKGROUND

5      The proposed engagement approach is outlined below.  More detailed information about engagement activities will be provided once key messages and options for the consultation document are decided and staff have confirmed a draft programme of events.

6      Engagement approaches evolves with the community and in response to the issues that require community input and other factors, such as technology.  The approach to the 10 Year Plan has been developed by staff reviewing the current situation and taking steps to widen the reach of engagement this time around.

Legislative context

7      Council’s engagement with the community on 10 Year Plans has to be undertaken in accordance the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002). The key requirements are set out in s.93 (the long term plan), s82 (the principles of consultation) and s83 (the special consultative procedure) – more detail is included in Attachment A.

8      Amendments to the LGA 2002 introduced in 2014 made the special consultative procedure less formal and provided for more flexibility in seeking and recording community feedback. The engagement plan for the 10 Year Plan responds to this opportunity and takes a more creative, and hopefully more effective, approach.

Key dates

9      The key dates for engagement and decision-making are:

a)     Formal consultation will run for 20 working days, from        Friday 23 March - Tuesday 24 April 2018

b)     Hearings will be held during the consultation period in the week of Monday 9 April – Friday 13 April 2018

c)     Deliberations are scheduled for Monday 14 May – Wednesday 16 May 2018.

DISCUSSION

10    The aim for the 10 Year Plan is to use engagement to achieve the widest reach, raising awareness of Plan’s content and providing all sectors of the community with opportunities to input.  With Councillor direction, engagement for this 10 Year Plan will be inclusive and accessible, fresh, bold and brave. The approach includes use of a range of different activities and mediums to get the word out and a range of different mechanisms for feedback.

11    The engagement approach builds on what has proved successful before, and introduces new elements to reach different parts of the community in fresh ways. The approach balances the ambition to generate greater engagement using new and creative methods with the practical pressures around resourcing delivery and managing costs.  Some innovative ways to do more with the same resources have been identified and included.

What’s the same?

12    Some existing approaches work and will be used, including:

a)     Consistent branding for the 10 Year Plan (an artist has developed the imagery for the Plan and the tagline is ‘Investing in our Great Small City’ – see Attachment B);

b)     A range of resources, such as postcards and posters, developed for use by staff and councillors;

c)     A consultation document, developed in accordance with sector guidance and legislative requirements;

d)     Print promotion setting out how to access further information and provide feedback to the Council, including regular FYI panels, media releases, ads in the Otago Daily Times, the Star and community newsletters;

e)     Static displays in a variety of locations;

f)     Social media and online channels will be used, including webpages with an online feedback form and a People’s Panel survey;

g)     Presence at scheduled community events, such as Brighton Gala Day and North East Valley Creekfest; and,

h)     Hearings where the community can speak to the Council in person.

What’s new?

13    With direction from elected members, particularly around supporting hard to reach groups within the community to have their say, the 10 Year Plan has provided an opportunity to look afresh at engagement.

14    Some of the key changes proposed include:

a)     Utilising staff and elected members as community engagement resources – activating all DCC staff and councillors to engage with the community on the 10 Year Plan from now until the end of the process.  This will include providing staff and councillors with key messages about the process and content of the Plan at critical points, and encouraging and supporting elected members to use their social media networks to generate engagement on the 10 Year Plan

b)     Leveraging the dynamic Dunedin community – the social fabric of Dunedin is strong and many organisations and groups have previously expressed their interest in running their own events to discuss the 10 Year Plan and encourage feedback.  To activate this and support it, ‘engagement packs’ will be developed that include the consultation document, postcards, videos, banners, pens etc. for use by these groups and DCC-related ones like the Dunedin Youth Council and Community Boards.

c)     Informal not formal events – some informal events will be planned to reach communities who may not normally engage.  These will be the focus rather than on holding a more traditional ‘launch’ event.  To ensure these are fit for purpose, staff are working with community groups such as the Youth Council to develop these events.More creative static displays in different places – more interactive 3D displays, e.g. cardboard structures, floor and wall art, will be used to display key messages and information about issues and options.  These will be placed in shop windows, noticeboards and other public areas across Dunedin. The displays will be able to be moved to different locations to increase reach and coverage.

Short, fun videos – a small set of short videos will be developed to deliver key information about the 10 Year Plan in a creative way.  This may also include an animated video (similar to that produced to explain the 2GP process) that could be used as part of the engagement pack and at informal and community events.

d)     Doing more with hearings – hearings, where people can speak to their submissions, have traditionally been held after consultation has concluded.  It’s proposed that to give equal weight to verbal and written submissions, and highlight to the public their ability to give only verbal feedback, hearings be scheduled during the consultation period for this 10 Year Plan. This change will allow hearings feedback to be processed with all other feedback received – reviewed, commented on by staff and analysed for consideration by the Council during deliberations. The change may also raise awareness through media coverage that the opportunity for feedback on the Plan exists, and generate community dialogue as people develop their submissions.

Early engagement

15    The majority of engagement activity will take place during the consultation period.  However, recognising that a month is often a tight timeframe for the community, staff and elected members will be supported and actively encouraged to raise awareness of Plan, engagement process and key issues in the lead-up to the formal consultation.

16    This means there will also be a more relaxed approach to early engagement activity.  For example, it is likely that the Dunedin Youth Council will run a stall at Thieves Alley to raise awareness of the 10 Year Plan and do some targeted engagement on the city to waterfront plans.

17    Early engagement is underway, began with seeking feedback on longer-term community priorities through last year’s annual plan process and has included hui with iwi and with youth (see Attachment C for more detail).  Ongoing community engagement e.g. through the Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS) is also being analysed.

18    The top priorities as identified by the community in ROS for the July-October period, in order of frequency, are: cycleways, economic development, renewing and maintaining core infrastructure and stormwater improvements.

19    The top five priorities identified at other engagement events, in order of frequency, are cycleways, community development, education, public transport and partnering with Mäori.

Capturing feedback

20    The community will be able to provide feedback in a range of ways, including: an on-line form; print copies of the feedback form; short form feedback cards for use at events, and potentially checklists of priorities; video recording of verbal feedback at Hearings.

21    Recording feedback is critical as all feedback, including social media comments and verbal feedback given at events counts.  Where feedback is not written, e.g. the record of a conversation between a councillor and a member of the public, staff are exploring the feasibility of establishing a dedicated text number and email address for staff and elected members to send feedback to as immediately as possible.

22    All feedback will be collated, analysed and reported back to the Council ahead of deliberations.

OPTIONS

23    Not applicable.

NEXT STEPS

24    The consultation document will be developed between December 2017 and February 2018 based on decisions made during the December 10 Year Plan Council meeting. Audit of consultation document and supporting document content and engagement plan will take place in late January – early February 2018.

25    Work on engagement planning is continuing and councillors updated and asked how they wish to participate as planning continues. 

26    Further details regarding the hearings process will be provided once staff have refined engagement planning and worked through the logistics and resourcing of the change in timing.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Community Engagement 10 Year Plan - Cover Page

41

b

Legislative requirements - Community engagement on 10 Year Plans

42

c

Summary of Pre-engagement Feedback

43

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and, meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure, public services and regulatory function in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The 10 Year Plan is part of the Council’s strategic framework. Forecast budgets, projects and activities associated with the implementation of the other strategies are included in the 10 Year Plan and reviewed in each Annual Plan Year. 

Māori Impact Statement

Engagement processes for the 10 Year Plan need to ensure there is opportunity for Māori to contribute to the decision-making process.

Sustainability

The 10 Year Plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the 30 year infrastructure strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There is funding allocated in the 2017/18 Annual Plan budget for 10 Year Plan Engagement activities.

Financial considerations

As noted above, there is funding allocated in the 2017/18 Annual Plan budget for 10 Year Plan Engagement activities.

Significance

This is considered to be of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Plans for community engagement on the 10 Year Plan are of interest to the community and are an important part of the overall development of the 10 Year Plan for the city.

Engagement – external

Although there has been no specific external engagement on engagement, broader discussions in 2016 and 2017 with Community Boards and the Youth Action Committee in particular, and from engagement feedback generally, covered Dunedin City Council planning processes and opportunities for comment.

Engagement - internal

This has been consulted on internally with the Marketing and Communications, Customer Service Agency, Finance, Events and Community Development, and Governance. 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There may be some health and safety risks around face to face public engagement that will be managed as the plan develops. 

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

This material will be of interest to Community Boards.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Three Waters - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: 3 Waters

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1.     This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Three Waters Group, and includes the following (legislatively mandated) groups of activities:

·           Water supply

·           Sewerage and sewage (Wastewater)

·           Stormwater.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 Operating Budget for Three Waters as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Water and Wastewater as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The service levels and performance measures for Three Waters as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

Revenue

Rates

2.     Rates have increased overall in the Three Waters Group by $2.901 million, 6%.

External revenue

3.     External revenue has increased by $662k, 11% due to an increase in water sales which incorporates rising consumption and tariff changes which cover associated supply cost increases.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

4.     Personnel costs have increased by $903k, 13%.  This incorporates a general salary increase and an increase in full time equivalent staff of 8.1. The focus of the staff increase is to ensure that the Networks Contracts, Planning and Delivery and Commercial and Regulatory teams are adequately resourced for anticipated workloads.

5.     The intent is to provide for an increased capital works programme with a more strategic, streamlined and proactive approach to asset planning, project appraisal, implementation and management of infrastructure. The structure also provides for in house meter reading, adequate support staff, succession planning and resilience.

Operations and maintenance

6.     Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $213k, 2%. The main increases are driven by increased maintenance costs for sediment cleaning work not previously undertaken of $300k, additional costs for Corridor Access Request (CAR) compliance costs and reinstating roads of $250k, ongoing modelling support of $232k,   condition assessment contracted works of $84k and extension of the meter reading contract $60k. Insurance held in the operations and maintenance budget in the 2018 year and now in occupancy costs, offsets the above increases by $862k.

Occupancy costs

7.     Occupancy costs have increased by $1.064 million, 13% due to reclassification of insurance costs $862k, additional insurance of $89k and increased energy costs.

Consumables and general costs

8.     Consumables and general costs have increased by $481k, 70%.  The main increase is for coastal erosion work $175k which was previously budgeted in Parks and Recreation,  Other increases relate to engineering consultants to deliver the proposed capital programme of $135k and assessment consultants for the Tahuna rising mains project $77k.

Fees and charges

9.     Some fees and charges for activities in the Three Waters Group have increased:

a.  City-wide unit rates for wastewater are calculated on a formula for trade waste charges, using budgeted volume and cost information.

b.  The tariff for water has been increased by 2.6% to $1.60 per cubic metre.  This is based on cost recovery for water supply.

10.   Some fees and charges for activities in the Three Waters Group have not changed: 

a.  Fees for compliance monitoring, re-inspection and consent breaches remain the same as seen as an incentive for business to remove tankered waste and comply with trade waste objectives.

b.  Annual water meter rental charges have not changed as supply fees are based on cost recovery of metered supply and include a component for the cost of meter replacement.

11.   There is a new fee for disconnections of water supply of $900 which includes traffic management and CAR requests.

12.   A copy of the fees schedule for Water Supply and Waste Water is provided at Attachment B.

SErvice Levels

13.   A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures (including mandatory measures) and targets. 

14.   Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C (and listed separately for each legislatively mandated group of activity).  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.  

 

Signatories

Author:

Tom Dyer - Group Manager 3 Waters

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Three Waters - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

55

b

Three Waters - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

56

c

Three Waters - Draft Statements of Service Provision

58

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities the Three Waters Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

The draft budgets provide for ongoing improvements to water quality and water management. There is iwi engagement on a case-by-case basis as projects are developed and implemented.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the Three Waters operating budgets will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Three Waters for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Three Waters Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



 


 


 

Three Waters Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: 3 Waters

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Three Waters Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Water supply

·           Sewerage and sewage (Wastewater)

·           Stormwater.

2      The total capex for the Three Waters Group is $296.541 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Three Waters Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the 3 Waters Group includes provision for renewal projects of $200.068 million and new capital projects of $96.473 million.  It should be noted that some of the new capital projects include a component of renewals.

4      The majority of new capital is associated with South Dunedin and the Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant. Remaining new capital is allocated for achieving compliance with legislation, improving efficiency and resilience or meeting service levels.

5      The primary reasons for the proposed increase in capital expenditure are:

a)     Increases in market rates for infrastructure renewals.

b)     An intention to reduce risks associated with asset failure and negative impacts on levels of service.

c)     Significant new capital to mitigate, where practicable, stormwater and wastewater flooding in South Dunedin

d)     Significant new capital to fund improvements to the Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant.

e)     Balancing the need to increase investment with the ability of internal and external resources to deliver, and to provide a more consistent and sustainable volume of work to the market to allow for capacity building in our contractor community.

f)     Considering affordability and acceptability to the public of associated rates rises and/or debt increases.

Major Projects

Renewals

6      There is $200.068 million included in the draft capex budget for the Three Waters Renewals Programme.  The Renewals Programme is based on estimated remaining lives across the entire Three Waters asset base.  This data is informed by condition assessment programmes and performance data, down to the individual asset level where possible.

7      The proposed programme only includes renewals projects that are required to maintain service levels. Renewals will proactively target significant risk areas, such as highly critical assets in order to prevent further significant service level failure.

Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant

8      There is $44.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade including $2.000 million of renewals in 2022.  This project aims to reconfigure the treatment process due to a change in the nature of the influent wastewater, replace aging assets, increase the plant capacity to receive additional flow from Kaikorai Valley and eliminate wastewater flows from Kaikorai Valley through the Caversham Tunnel to South Dunedin.

9      The Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade will provide increased capacity to respond to growth, improve public health and environmental outcomes, renew and replace assets and increase levels of service.

South Dunedin Flood Alleviation

10    There is $35.000 million included in the draft capex budget for South Dunedin Flood Alleviation, including $2.000 million of renewals in 2023.  South Dunedin is susceptible to flooding during heavy rainfall events with the potential to damage homes, business and infrastructure.  This project will provide catchment wide flood alleviation and improve current levels of service in heavy rainfall events.  It is likely that the focus in the first three years of the 10 year plan will be on planning, design and research.

11    This project will improve public health and environmental outcomes, increase levels of service, renew and replace assets and improve capacity to respond to growth.

Mount Grand Upgrade

12    There is $8.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the Mount Grand Mid-Life Upgrade.  This upgrade aims to renew and replace assets that are at the end of their useful life, as determined by an asset condition assessment, and provide increased capacity to respond to growth.

Northern Wastewater Treatment Plants

13    There is $4.900 million included in the draft capex budget for Northern Water Schemes Upgrades. Upgrades to Seacliff, Warrington and Waikouaiti Wastewater Treatment Plants prior to discharge consents falling due will ensure they are able to meet effluent quality targets.

Ross Creek to Mount Grand Transfer Line

14    There is $4.440 million included in the draft capex budget for completing the Security of Supply Project.  This budget is creation of a transfer line from Ross Creek to Mount Grand. The Security of Supply project aims to ensure that water stored in the soon to be refurbished Ross Creek Reservoir is able to be transferred to Mount Grand Water Treatment Plant for treatment and distribution.

15    The Ross Creek to Mount Grand Raw Water Pipeline and Pump Station project effectively increases the level of service by reducing risks to the security of Dunedin's water supply

EXternal Funding

16    There is no external funding for capital expenditure for the Three Waters Group.

17    As much as possible, growth projects will be funded through Development Contributions.

 

Signatories

Author:

Tom Dyer - Group Manager 3 Waters

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Three Waters - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

67

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities the Three Waters Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

The draft budgets provide for ongoing improvements to water quality and water management. There is iwi engagement on a case-by-case basis as projects are developed and implemented.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the Three Waters capital expenditure programme will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Three Waters for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Three Waters Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Roading and Footpaths - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Roading and Footpaths Group and includes Transport activities.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Roading and Footpaths Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Transport as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Roading and Footpaths Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

Revenue

Rates

2      Rates have increased overall in Transport by $493k, 4%. 

External revenue

3      External revenue has increased by $169k, 26%.  The increase is primarily driven by an increase in corridor access revenue due to the ultrafast broadband project.  The increase also includes a 4% increase in fees and increased revenue from road stopping and recoverable revenue. 


 

Grants and subsidies revenue

4      Grants and subsidies revenue has reduced by $1.907 million, -7%.  New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) funding assistance for capital expenditure (capex) projects has increased by $853k reflecting the capex programme.  This is offset by a reduction of $2.000 million from the Urban Cycle Fund which was a one off budget in the 2017/18 year, a reduction in NZTA funding assistance for the opex budgets of $514k and a reduction in revenue from the Otago Regional Council (ORC) of $252k which was a one-off budget for bus shelters in 2017/18.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

5      Personnel costs in Transport have increased by $652k, 20%.  This incorporates a general salary increase and an increase in full time equivalent staff of 7.5.  The additional staff numbers address capacity issues within the Transport Group with key areas of focus on contract management, customer service, safety improvements, project planning, technical expertise, as well as asset management planning.

Operations and maintenance

6      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $305k, 2%. The main increases are driven by sealed pavement maintenance of $144k, mud tank waste disposal and contractual increases of $249k and footpath maintenance of $89k.  The increase has been offset by a reduction in ORC bus shelters of $250k (funded for 2017/18 only) and community road safety of $93k.

Consumables and general costs

7      Consumables and general costs have decreased by $92k, -6%. The main decreases are from reductions in traffic modelling of $250k and central city plan scoping of $100k.  The reduction in costs has been offset by an increase in bridge inspections, traffic counting and unsubsidised consultants (eg central city work). Please note that funding for the central city project is included in the Governance and Support Services Group budget.

Depreciation

8      Depreciation has increased by $984k, 5% reflecting the 30 June 2017 revaluation of the Transport network.

Fees and charges

9      Fees and charges for activities in Transport have been generally increased by 4% (with some rounding).  A copy of the Transport fees schedule for 2018/19 is provided at Attachment B.

10    The fees and charges for residents’ parking and constructing parking areas have been transferred from Parking Services to Transport.

Service Levels

11    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures (including mandatory measures) and targets.  

12    The proposed levels of service statements, measures and targets in the draft 10 year plan, with any proposed changes from the current statements, measures and targets marked, are provided at Attachment C.

 

Signatories

Author:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Roading and Footpaths - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

74

b

Roading and Footpaths - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

75

c

Roading and Footpaths - Draft Statement of Service Provision

77

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Roading and Footpaths Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the Roading and Footpaths operating budgets will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Roading and Footpaths for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Roading and Footpaths Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Roading and Footpaths Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Roading and Footpaths Group for consideration in the 10 year plan and includes Transport activities.

2      The total capex for the Roading and Footpaths Group is $363.934 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Roading and Footpaths Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Roading and Footpaths Group includes provision for renewal projects of $161.126 million and new capital projects of $202.808 million.  It should be noted that some of the new capital projects include a component of renewals.

Major Projects

Transport Renewals

4      There is $161.126 million included in the draft capex budget for the Transport Renewals Programme.

5      This project includes a programme of renewals annually to maintain existing levels of service on the Dunedin transport network. It includes pavement reseals, pavement rehabilitations, seawalls, retaining walls, bridges, footpaths and kerb and channel.

6      This programme of renewals maintains an existing level of service on Dunedin’s transport network. Renewals are planned on a three year cycle and subject to annual validation. There are strong community expectations that the transport network is maintained to an acceptable condition. Renewal practices will be in accordance with the One Network Road Classification system that is being introduced by NZTA.

 

7      The programme of transport renewals includes provision for:

a)     Pavement renewals of $53.405 million

b)     Footpath renewals of $27.116 million

c)     Pavement rehabilitations of $24.477 million

d)     Major drainage control of $20.942 million

e)     Structure component replacement of $17.245 million

f)     Gravel road re-metaling of $12.517 million

g)     Traffic services renewals of $5.425 million

Central City Upgrade

8      There is $60.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the Central City Upgrade.  The aim of this project is to improve safety, accessibility and amenity in the central city area. The project will increase safety, particularly for pedestrians and cyclists, and contribute to a more vibrant, thriving central city environment.

9      This Central City Upgrade will maintain services levels on some streets and improve service levels on others. The increased service levels will be delivered through amenity upgrades and improvements to footpaths and associated infrastructure.

10    There is a separate Central City Options Report for the Council’s consideration.

Peninsula Connection

11    There is $44.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the Peninsula Connection Project.   This project will complete a series of improvements to Portobello Road and Harrington Point Road (together ‘Peninsula road’). These improvements aim to improve safety for all road users, provide for walking and cycling, improve resilience to high tide and weather events, and improve efficiency and travel time reliability.

12    This Peninsula Connection Project will increase service levels on the peninsula. The existing road is unsafe and in most areas has no provision for cyclists and pedestrians. The addition of a shared path and the widening of the road will improve service levels for all users. There is significant community interest in this project.

Dunedin Urban Cycleways

13    There is $23.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme. This programme has a focus on road safety, and on providing an appropriate level of service to encourage the uptake of cycling for everyone.  The NZTA is working closely with the Council to develop the city’s cycling infrastructure, and is supporting the programme with project funding and guidance. 

14    The Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme will improve levels of service for cyclists in Dunedin.

Minor Improvements

15    There is $20.000 million included in the draft capex budget for Minor Improvements.  The aim of the projects funded through this programme is to improve the safety and resilience of the road infrastructure across the city.    

16    The Minor Improvements will improve services levels at some locations around the city and maintain service levels at others. 

City to Waterfront Connection

17    There is $20.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the City to Waterfront Connection Project. The aim of this project is to improve the connection between the city centre and harbour.  Existing links include the level-crossing at St Andrew Street, a heritage pedestrian bridge over the railway tracks behind the Railway Station and a convoluted route across Castle Street and Wharf Street via the Jetty Street road bridge. These existing connections have a number of restrictions including accessibility for cyclists or mobility impaired users, delay and directness of route, and safety issues.

18    The City to Waterfront Connection Project will deliver an increased level of service through the addition of a new bridge connecting the city to the harbour.

19    The full cost of the City to Waterfront Connection Project is expected to be $20.000 million. It is envisaged that $6.000 million will be funded from stakeholders and community funders, and that $5.500 million will be received from New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA).  The draft capex budget includes the full cost and NZTA contribution.

20    There is a separate City to Waterfront Connection Options Report for the Council’s consideration.

LED Streetlights

21    There is $12.000 million included in the draft capex budget for LED Streetlights. The project involves a one-to-one replacement of existing High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lights with LED lights and the installation of a central management system to provide greater flexibility in the operation of the lights. Switching to LEDs will save both energy and maintenance costs compared to using HPS lights.

22    The LED Streetlight Upgrade will maintain existing service levels. The current condition of our street light programme is poor with increasing failure rates over the last 3 years. These maintenance costs will continue to increase until the replacement programme is complete.

Tertiary Precinct

23    There is $11.300 million included in the draft capex budget for the Tertiary Precinct Safety and Accessibility Upgrade.  The aim of this project is to improve the safety and accessibility of the Tertiary Precinct, with particular emphasis on the streetscape and pedestrian/cycling environment.  The streets around Dunedin’s tertiary institutions are not an attractive environment to encourage and support active and public transport use, and there are some known safety issues.   

24    The Tertiary Precinct Safety and Accessibility Upgrade will maintain services levels on some streets and improve service levels on others. The increased service levels will be delivered through amenity upgrades and improvements to footpaths and associated infrastructure.

25    There is a separate Tertiary Precinct Options Report for the Council’s consideration.

Major Centres Upgrade

26    There is $8.500 million included in the draft capex budget for Major Centres Upgrades, commencing in 2024. The aim of the Centres Programme is to improve the safety and accessibility of the main streets within Dunedin’s commercial shopping centres.  The Spatial Plan identifies a hierarchy of commercial centres which has been developed and refined through the 2GP.  These centres are an important focal point for local communities, providing a range of services and a place for social interaction. 

27    The series of Major Centres Upgrades will increase the level of service in our major town centres outside of the CBD. The majority of these town centres are old and have had little investment in infrastructure in recent years. The project will consist of amenity upgrades and improvements to footpaths and associated infrastructure.

External Funding

28    New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) contributes to the capital programme on a reducing scale over the 10 year plan.  Standard NZTA project contribution rates are Year 1 56%, Year 2 55%, Year 3 54%, Year 4 53%, Year 5 52%, Years 6-10 51% per annum.

29    Exceptions to the standard NZTA external funding are projects with larger amenity components. These include the Major Centres Upgrade, Central City Upgrade and Tertiary Precinct where it has been assumed for the purposes of the draft budget that half the standard NZTA project contribution is received.

30    It has been assumed that $5.500 million will be received from NZTA towards the City to Waterfront Connection project. It is envisaged that $6.000 million will be funded from stakeholders and community funders, however only the NZTA contribution is included in the draft capex budget at this stage.

31    As much as possible, growth projects will be funded through Development Contributions.

 

Signatories

Author:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Roading and Footpaths - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

85

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Roading and Footpaths Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the Roading and Footpaths capital expenditure programme will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Roading and Footpaths for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Roading and Footpaths Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Reserves and Recreational Facilities - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year operating expenditure (opex) programme for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Aquatic Services

·           Dunedin Botanic Garden

·           Cemeteries and Crematorium (Cemeteries)

·           Parks and Reserves (Parks).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Aquatic Services, Cemeteries and Crematorium and Parks and Reserves as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

Revenue

Rates

2      Rates have increased overall in the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group of activities by $5.276 million, 21%. Please note that this increase is not driven entirely by budget changes, it is also influenced by a change to the budgeted net surplus.  This activity budget now has a break-even position.

Grants and subsidies

3      Grants and subsidies revenue has increased by $217k, 51%.  This is due to an increase in New Zealand Transport Agency subsidy in Parks for the vegetation contract of $217k as a result of higher contract costs.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

4      Personnel costs have increased by $640k, 10%.  This includes provision for a general salary increase, an increase in full time equivalent (FTE) staff of 2.9 and an increase in the salaries for Aquatic Services.

5      A roster correction in Aquatic Services along with health and safety legislation changes (lone worker requirements) means the budget now reflects higher costs for staffing the facilities and has resulted in an increase on FTE of 3.9.  This increase has been offset by a reduction of 1.0 FTE in Cemeteries.

Operations and maintenance

6      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $352k, 2%. Increases in the Parks budget provides for increased costs associated with the green space maintenance contracts $249k, traffic management costs of $400k and for maintenance of toilets previously included in Property budgets of $230k. 

7      The increased costs in Parks have been partially offset by the planned reduction of Waikouaiti Forestry replanting of $100k due to the programme of works expanding over six years rather than the initial three years proposed, and the transfer of Ocean Beach funding of $200k to the Three Waters Group.

8      Aquatic Services maintenance costs for exterior painting and plant maintenance have increased $178k which is a reflection of the age of some plant.

9      A reduction in building maintenance at the Botanic Garden of $97k follows completion of the scheduled maintenance programme.

10    Insurance costs of $216k have been reclassified as occupancy costs.

Occupancy costs

11    Occupancy costs have increased by $502k, 18%. This is primarily due to increases in Parks for water, rates and security.  There are also increased costs in Aquatic Services of $33k for rates and electricity and the Botanic Garden of $31k for electricity costs.

12    Insurance costs of $216k have been reclassified from operations and maintenance costs.

Consumables and general costs

13    Consumables and general costs have increased by $167k, 19%.  This is primarily due to increases in Parks for strategy implementation costs $110k and consultancy fees for contract expertise.

Grants and subsidies

14    Grants and subsidies have decreased by $487k, -48%.  This is due to the reduction of the one-off hockey turf grant provided in the 2017/18 budget.

Depreciation

15    Depreciation has increased by $564k, 15%.

Fees and charges

16    Fees and charges for Cemeteries, Parks and Aquatic Services have generally increased by 4% (with some rounding).  A copy of the Reserves and Recreational Facilities fees schedule is provided at Attachment B.

17    There has been no increase in some fees in Aquatic Services, including the child fees (eg. toddler time, school swim, child admission, Waikouaiti babies lessons); towel hire and refundable deposit for hire; lane usage per hour; adult casual rate at Mosgiel Pool and Port Chalmers Pool.

18    There are new fees for Moana Premium Memberships (includes unlimited gym/swim and group fitness class access).

Service Levels

19    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

20    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Reserves and Recreational Facilities - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

92

b

Reserves and Recreational Facilities - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

93

c

Reserves and Recreational Facilities - Draft Statement of Service Provision

100

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure and public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Reserves and Recreational Facilities for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the budgets for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Reserves and Recreational Facilities Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Aquatic Services (Aquatics)

·           Cemeteries and Crematorium (Cemeteries)

·           Dunedin Botanic Garden

·           Parks and Reserves (Parks).

2      The total capex for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group is $63.059 million.

1     RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group includes provision for renewal projects of $52.739 million and new capital projects of $10.320 million. 

4      The 10 year capital plan for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group is primarily focused on ensuring existing service levels are maintained, modern health and safety and accessibility standards are met across the city’s recreational asset portfolio and that the city’s cemetery space is adequate.

5      Funding towards an artificial turf facility at Logan Park of $1.000 million was included in the 2017/18 capex budget. There is no specific funding for the Logan Park Precinct Plan included in the draft 10 year capex budget. There is a broader review of the wider parks network including Logan Park and a report will be provided to the Council.

Parks Renewals

6      There is $36.116 million included in the draft capex budget for renewals in Parks and Reserves. This includes provision for:

a)     Renewing public facilities and built recreational assets such as public toilets, coastal structures, athletics facilities, sports field lights and gymnasiums of $24.751 million.

b)     Renewing playground assets of $6.696 million.

c)     Renewing soft or living assets such as sports turf, trees, and gardens of $4.670 million.

Aquatics Renewals

7      There is $16.413 million included in the draft capex budget for renewals in Aquatics. This includes provision for:

a)     Renewing building assets at Moana Pool such as windows, lighting, pool deck, boilers, pumps and treatment systems, gym plant assets, and change room refurbishment of $9.825 million.

b)     Replacing the Moana Pool hydroslide of $4.040 million.

c)     Renewing community pool plant and built assets at Mosgiel, Port Chalmers and St Clair pools of $2.548 million, no renewals are planned for Mosgiel Pool with the pending development.   

Mosgiel Pool

8      There is $6.400 million included in the draft capex budget for the proposed Mosgiel Pool. This is the Council contribution only.

9      Council in partnership with the Taieri Community Facilities Trust has resolved to upgrade the existing aquatic facility at Mosgiel. The size of the Mosgiel Pool development will be dependent on funding provided from the community and third party funders.

10    The Mosgiel Pool upgrade will improve service levels in the city’s overall provision of aquatic services. 

Mosgiel Cemetery Expansion

11    There is $2.820 million included in the draft capex budget for the expansion of the Mosgiel Cemetery. This project will provide further burial space to accommodate future demand in existing cemeteries through the development of a new cemetery in the Mosgiel area.  This project will work through the initial feasibility study to assess the needs and possible options to provide further burial space in close proximity to Mosgiel.

12    The Mosgiel Cemetery Expansion will ensure the Council maintains service levels in the city’s overall provision of Cemeteries Services. 

Miscellaneous Projects

13    There is $500k included for upgrading track assets to ensure the network is safe and accessible.

14    There is $400k included for Cemeteries city-wide beam expansion.

15    There is $209k included for replacing Cemeteries assets such as gates, fences and certain memorials.

External Funding

16    There is no external funding for capital expenditure for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group.

17    As much as possible, growth projects will be funded through Development Contributions.

18    The draft capex budget includes the Council’s contribution of $6.400 million only towards the Mosgiel Pool development.   The size of the Mosgiel Pool development will be dependent on funding provided from the community and third party funders.

 

Signatories

Author:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Reserves and Recreational Facilities - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

107

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure and public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Reserves and Recreational Facilities for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been engagement with the Taieri Community Facilities Trust in developing the draft budgets for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Property - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Property

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Property Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Housing

·           Commercial Property

·           Operational Property.

·      RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Property Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedule for Housing as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Property Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

Revenue

Rates

2      Rates have decreased overall in the Property Group by $212k, -5%.

External revenue

3      External revenue has increased by $59k, 0%. The increase is due to an increase in Housing rental revenue of $438k.  There are some decreases in revenue due to the vacant tenancy of the YMCA property of $275k, the expected sale of a Midland Street property of $99k and reduced operating recoveries from the Regent Theatre of $38k.

4      Work is underway to review the portfolio and progress the disposal of some properties. However, the timing and income from any potential sales is not yet known. Therefore, the 2018/19 budget is prepared on the basis that, with the exception of a Midland Street property, all existing properties remain within the portfolio.

5      There is an increase in recoveries from Dunedin Venues Management Limited for the Dunedin Centre/Town Hall complex of $79k.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

6      Personnel costs have increased by $1.475 million, 95%. This includes $1.2 million for the new structure and provision for general salary increases.

7      Full time equivalent (FTE) staff in Property has increased by 13 FTE.  This provides for the delivery of property maintenance to current service level requirements, ensuring that tenancies are appropriately managed and ensuring appropriate focus and expertise to develop and deliver forward works programmes.

Operations and maintenance

8      Operations and maintenance costs have decreased by $49k, -1%.   There are increased costs for Housing grounds maintenance of $124k, Wall Street maintenance of $76k, Tarpits dewatering costs of $78k and Treffers Road (Christchurch) maintenance of $100k.  These cost increases incorporate key maintenance work to ensure full compliance, and ensure that assets do not fail prematurely.

9      Cost reductions which offset these increases include Art Gallery maintenance $80k, Toitū maintenance $38k and Chinese Garden maintenance $54k. The reductions reflect contract efficiencies as well as appropriately targeted preventative maintenance.

Occupancy costs

10    Occupancy costs have increased by $1.690 million, 28% due to increased rates, insurance costs, building WOF costs and cleaning across the Property Group.  The increased cost has been offset by the transfer of exeloo toilets to Parks of $261k. 

Consumables and general costs

11    Consumable and general costs have increased by $811k, 252%.  This is due to increased engineering and general consultancy costs required to assess the condition of our building stock and to inform the forward works programme.  The budget also includes $200k as part of a longer term programme of asbestos surveys to comply with new regulations.


 

Fees and charges

12    The funding policy requires fees and charges for the Housing activity to be set to break even. There has been no increase in rent for the past 4 years.  It is proposed to increase the rent for all types of unit by $9 per week. Under the terms of the tenancy agreement, rental increases can only apply from 1 August 2018. 

13    Housing is considered to be affordable where tenants spend a maximum of 30% of household income on rent. The table below shows the current rent and proposed rent compared to income for super annuitants and for job seekers (based on a single separate unit).

Tenant type

DCC rent ($110.70 pw)

2017/18

DCC rent ($119.70 pw)

2018/19

Single super annuitant

28% of income

30% of income

Single job seeker (under 65)

40% of income

43% of income

        Assumes superannuation and benefits increase of 2% in 2018/19

14    Approximately 65% of our tenants are super annuitants.  Of the 35% who are jobseekers, the majority are considered to be “older persons” (over 55).

Service Levels

15    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

16    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Laura McElhone  - Group Manager - Property Services

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Property - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

114

b

Housing - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

115

c

Property - Draft Statement of Service Provision

116

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure and public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Property Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Property for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Property Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator



 

Property Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Property

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Property Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Commercial property

·           Housing

·           Operational property.

2      The total capex for the Property Group is $62.980 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Property Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Property Group includes provision for renewal projects of $52.500 million and new capital projects of $10.480 million.

4      The draft 10 year capex budget attempts to provide an estimate of a sustainable capital spend required to maintain the integrity of the portfolio as well as provide high-level estimates for planned capital projects. It is based on the available information at the time the budgets were prepared and new information is emerging as the condition of the properties is assessed. It is highly likely that the capital budget will need to be significantly increased in future years in order to maintain existing services. The quantum will only become clear once a larger proportion of the portfolio has been more thoroughly assessed.

Major projects

Property renewals

5      There is $52.500 million included in the draft capex budget for Property renewals for replacement of building subsystems including among other things roofs, HVAC equipment and electrical distribution equipment.

6      The renewal spend forecast is based on an industry standard, being 2% of building replacement value. A conservative estimate given the average age and condition of the portfolio. 2016 is used as the ‘baseline’ which is increased in an arithmetic progression through to 2020, at which point the budget for capital renewals becomes flat.

7      There is $6.500 million included in the draft capex budget for Housing renewals. It is proposed that a multi sector Mayor’s Taskforce for Housing is established in early 2018, including representatives from Council, social housing, property development and central government sectors and Kāi Tahu.  The Taskforce will consider central government’s policies on housing, explore opportunities for collaboration in the delivery of housing services and provide strategic recommendations for housing in Dunedin. Staff will report to Council on the completion of the review in May 2018.

8      There is no specific funding for refurbishing the Civic Centre and City Library.  A feasibility and business case process will inform the capital budget for this project for consideration in the next 10 year plan.

South Dunedin Community Hub

9      There is $5.250 million included in the draft capex budget for the South Dunedin Community Hub in 2020 and 2021. This project will provide for a permanent South Dunedin Community Hub, including a Council Service Centre, community spaces, service point for the Dunedin Public Libraries, free internet access, community learning and technology centre and public meeting rooms.

10    The development of the South Dunedin Community Hub will represent an increased level of service to the community.

Sammy’s Building

11    There is $5.000 million included in the draft capex budget for the Sammy’s Building in 2021 as a placeholder.  This budget will require confirmation through feasibility and business case process, the cost and funding of which is yet to be determined.

12    Any future redevelopment of the Sammy’s Building may represent an increased level of service to the community.

External Funding

13    There is no external funding for capital expenditure for the Property Group.

 

Signatories

Author:

Laura McElhone  - Group Manager - Property Services

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Property - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

123

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure and public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Property Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Property for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the budgets for the Property Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Libraries and Museums - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budgets

Department: Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Libraries and Museums Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Dunedin Public Art Gallery (DPAG)

·           Dunedin Public Libraries (Libraries)

·           Olveston

·           Otago Museum levy

·           Toitū Otago Settlers Museum (Toitū)

·           Dunedin Chinese Garden.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Libraries and Museums Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Libraries, Olveston, Toitū Otago Settlers Museum and Dunedin Chinese Garden as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Libraries and Musuems Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

2      The draft operating budget for 2018/19 provides for ‘business as usual’. Funding for City of Literature was due to end on 30 June 2018. The continuation of funding for City of Literature has been included in this draft budget.

Revenue

Rates

3      Rates have increased overall in the Museum and Libraries Group of activities by $769k, 3%.   

External revenue

4      External revenue has decreased by $80k, -4%.  The main reason for this is due to the reduced number of rental items borrowed from the Library and overdue charges.

Grants and subsidies

5      Grants have decreased by $97k, -25%.  This is due to the reduction in DPAG Society funding for acquisitions, with a corresponding reduction in capital expenditure.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

6      Personnel costs have increased by $363k, 4%.  This incorporates provision for a salary increase and additional staff for the South Dunedin Community Pop-Up.

Operations and maintenance

7      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $143k, 10%. The main increases are driven by insurance costs, South Dunedin Community Pop-Up and the Chinese Garden 10 year anniversary celebration. 

Grants and subsidies

8      The budget for the Otago Museum has been increased by $110k, 3% to $4.1 million.

Internal charges

9      Internal charges have increased by $323k, 5%.  This incorporates an increase in allocated corporate costs, which now include an allocation to Olveston (previously not budgeted) and an increase in Toitū property rental, previously classified under occupancy costs – see note 8 above..

Depreciation

10    Depreciation has decreased by $463k, -21%.

Fees and charges

11    Some fees and charges for Olveston, Dunedin Chinese Garden and Libraries have increased and others have remained the same.  A copy of the fees schedule for the Libraries and Museums Group is provided at Attachment B.

12    Some fees have been removed from the Libraries as the collection or services no longer exist (eg. compact discs and DVD player hire charge).  There is a new fee for laptop community hire charge.

Service Levels

13    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

14    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Libraries and Museums - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

130

b

Libraries and Museums - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

131

c

Libraries and Museums - Draft Statement of Service Provision

134

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Libraries and Museums Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Libraries and Museums for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

The Otago Museum and Olveston Management Committee have been involved in developing the budgets for their respective activities. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Libraries and Museums Draft 10-year Capital Budget

Department: Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Libraries and Museums Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Dunedin Public Art Gallery (DPAG)

·           Dunedin Public Libraries (Libraries)

·           Olveston

·           Toitū Otago Settlers Museum (Toitū)

·           Dunedin Chinese Garden.

 

2      The total capex for the Libraries and Museums Group is $17.027 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Libraries and Museums Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Libraries and Museums Group primarily includes provision for renewal projects of $13.861 million and some provision for new capital projects of $3.166 million.

Major Projects

Dunedin Public Art Gallery

4      DPAG renewals: $1.407 million has been included in the draft capex budget for DPAG renewals for the heating and ventilation system, goods lift, chilled water pipe replacement, exhibition lighting and security cameras.

5      DPAG acquisitions: $1.150 million across the 10 years for additions to the permanent Art Gallery collections in the form of new paintings, sculptures, photographs and moving images. $500k is rates funded, $350k is funded from gifts and donations and $300k is funded by the DPAG Society.

6      Other improvements: $454k has been included in the draft capex budget for other improvements including a new storage area in the DPAG basement, additional rack storage in the decorative arts store and minor capital renewals to building fixtures and fittings.

7      Art in public places:  $200k has been included in the draft capex budget for art installations in public places.

Dunedin Public Libraries

8      Libraries renewals: $9.116 million is included in the draft capex budget for purchasing lending and reference collection materials used by the community for information, recreation and self-education. Over the 10 year period of the 10 year plan, it is expected that fewer physical collection materials will be purchased with an increase in eBook, eAudio, eZine and online digital resources will be purchased. 

9      Heritage acquisitions: $662k across the 10 years for purchasing new heritage collection materials to support the local history and cultural heritage of Dunedin. $562k is rates funded and $100k is funded by interest on the Reed Trust funds held by Council.

10    Other renewals: There is also $545k for minor capital equipment purchases (eg. barcode scanners, library shelving, public area furniture, etc.).

Olveston

11    Olveston renewals: $353k has been included in the draft capex budgets for building maintenance/renewals and minor equipment and furniture replacements. 

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum/Dunedin Chinese Garden

12    Toitū renewals: $1.940 million has been included in the draft capex budget for Toitū renewals. The proposed replacement period will depend on the condition and expected life of the asset.  Likely replacements and renewals include the HVAC system in the Archives area, front counter, foyer video wall, exhibition IT hardware, Reveal camera system, building management system hardware, scissor lift and Genie, HVAC and building management system wall mounted sensors, Toitū gallery furniture and office, and conservation laboratory.

13    Dunedin Chinese Garden: $500k has been included in 2020 for replacing furniture and plant in the Dunedin Chinese Garden.

14    Toitū acquisitions: $500k across the 10 years for purchasing new items for the Museum collection.  The acquisitions are fully rates funded.

15    Minor capital works: $200k has been included in the draft capex budget for the replacement of minor equipment and building work.

Related capital projects

16    Capital expenditure related to the Libraries and Museums Group included in other Council budgets include:

·           Central Library Refurbishment (discussed in the Property capex budget report).

·           Mobile Library Services (included in the Governance and Support Services capex budget).

·           South Dunedin Community Hub (included in the Property capex budget).

External Funding

17    DPAG expects to receive $350k over the 10 year period from donations and $300k over the 10 year period from DPAG Society towards funding the purchase of acquisitions.

 

Signatories

Author:

Bernie Hawke - Group Manager Arts and Culture

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Libraries and Museums - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

141

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Libraries and Museums Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Libraries and Museums for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

The Otago Museum and Olveston Management Committee have been involved in developing the budgets for their respective activities. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Regulatory Services - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Customer and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Regulatory Services Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Building Services

·           Compliance Solutions (includes Alcohol Licensing, Animal Services and Environmental Health)

·           Parking Operations

·           Parking Services (enforcement).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Regulatory Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Alcohol Licensing, Animal Services, Building Services, Environmental Health, Parking Operations and Parking Services as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Regulatory Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 


 

Operating Budgets

Revenue

External Revenue

2      External revenue has increased by $1.074 million, 7%. The main increase of $633k is due to Building Services fee increases as well as introducing new fees for code of compliance certificates and amending the Building Consents Authority (BCA) levy.  Increased revenue is also budgeted from Parking Services and Parking Operations of $409k.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

3      Personnel costs have increased by $598k, 9%.  This incorporates a general salary increase and an increase in full time equivalent (FTE) staff of 4.5. 

4      FTE in Building Services have increased by 3.0 FTE.  This includes one Building Consent Officer, one Building Administration Officer as well as an additional Senior Building Inspector (recoverable by increased revenue).         

5      Parking Operations has an additional 0.5 FTE for a meter technician and provision is made for an additional Parking Enforcement Officer to provide a greater level of coverage across the city. 

Operations and maintenance

6      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $274k, 37%. The main increases are in Building Services and Compliance Solutions of $214k for increased external technical and professional advice and public liability insurance.     

Consumables and general costs

7      Consumables and general costs have increased by $125k, 12%. Increased costs in Parking Services are due to increased bank charges, court fees, paper costs and hand held meter software costs.

8      Increased costs in Building Services are due to external assessment costs for staff competency to support BCA accreditation.

Fees and charges

9      Fees and charges for activities in the Regulatory Services Group have generally been increased by 4% (with some rounding), unless set by statute or explained below.  A copy of the group fees schedule for the Regulatory Services Group is provided at Attachment B.

10    Notable exceptions in Building Services include:

a)     Proposed new fees for work related to Code of Compliance Certificate and Certificate of Acceptance based on current sector practice.  The fees range from $88 to $704 depending on the type, scale and value of the building work.  

b)     Proposed a new fee for cancelling an inspection on the same of day of $175.70.

c)     Increased fees for certificate of titles and property reports/documents for filing to cover costs for LINZ, technical assessments and administrative time.

d)     Amended the charging model for BCA levy based on current sector practice.  The flat fee of $7 has been changed to 30 cents for every $1k of building work with a minimum fee of $6.

e)     Included new fees for sealing off sewer connections which includes carriage access requests and traffic management costs, renewal of certificate for public use and earthquake-prone building infringements (set by statute).

f)     Amended the charging model for Building Compliance Certificates from an hourly rate to a fixed fee of $264.

g)     Amended the charging model for Certificate for Public Use from an hourly rate to a fixed fee of $440.

11    Exceptions of interest in Animal Services include:

a)     An increase to the rebate for neutering/spaying dogs from $6 to $10 which is likely to reduce revenue by around $20k.  It is likely this loss will be offset by a reduction in request for services and complaints about aggressive behaviour and wandering dogs. 

b)     The fee for special aid dogs has been reduced to zero.

c)     Fees and charges for second and third impounding of horses, asses, mules, cattle, deer, sheep, goats and pigs; and the third and subsequent impounding of dogs have been removed.

12    Environmental Health includes new fees for out of district verifications, as the new Food Act allows the DCC to verify national programmes out of Dunedin.

13    Parking Enforcement includes new fees for mobility exemption and 75 plus permits, and for not returning permits.

14    Fees in Parking Operations are unchanged apart from fees for leased weekly parking in parking buildings and off-street carparks which are increased by 4% (with some rounding).

15    Fees and charges for residents’ parking and construction parking areas have been transferred from Parking Services to Transport.

Service Levels

16    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

17    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

18    The proposed change in target from 90% to 60% for the ‘percentage of residents satisfied with the control of roaming dogs’ corrects an error in the current 10 year plan.  The Residents’ Opinion Survey satisfaction result for this measure has remained in the range of 60% to 65% over the past five years, and the target should reflect the level of service provided. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Adrian Blair - Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Regulatory Services Group - 2018/19 Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

149

b

Regulatory Services Group - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

150

c

Regulatory Services - Draft Statement of Service Provision

159

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services and regulatory functions in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Regulatory Services Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Regulatory Services for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Regulatory Services Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



 

Regulatory Services Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Customer and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Regulatory Services Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Compliance Solutions (includes Animal Services and Environmental Health)

·           Parking Operations

·           Parking Services (enforcement).

2      The total capex for the Regulatory Services Group is $3.650 million.

1     

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Regulatory Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for Regulatory Services Group includes provision for renewal projects of $3.560 million and a small new capital budget of $90k. 

4      The draft 10 year capex budget for Regulatory Services will maintain current service levels.  The regulatory compliance areas are primarily operational, with a relatively low level of capex required.  However these areas do have a high dependency on IT for service delivery and there has been considerable collaboration with BIS in terms of their future requirements.

Major projects

Regulatory Services

5      There is $2.450 million included in the draft capex budget for replacing on and off street parking meters. 

6      There is $920k included in the draft capex budget for replacing meters in parking building.

7      There is $280k included in the draft capex budget for replacing noise meters, electronic ticker writers and Parking Services body worn cameras, and for new Animal Services body worn cameras and radio telephone system for Animal Services.

External Funding

8      There is no external funding for capital expenditure in the Regulatory Services Group.

 

Signatories

Author:

Adrian Blair - Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Regulatory Services - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

165

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services and regulatory functions in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Regulatory Services Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Regulatory Services for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Regulatory Services Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Waste Management - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Waste Management Group and includes Waste and Environmental Solutions activities.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Waste Management Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Waste and Environmental Solutions as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Waste Management Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Revenue

Rates

2      Rates revenue has decreased by $99k, -3%. 

External revenue

3      External revenue has increased by $3.919 million, 38%. It is expected that an additional 39,000 tonnes of general waste will be disposed at the Green Island landfill due to the closure of the Fairfield landfill, resulting in $3.511 million additional revenue from disposal charges.  An additional $351k for waste levy revenue is expected due to the increased landfill tonnage. The anticipated increase in refuse bag sale price and volume adds $300k.

Internal revenue

4      Internal revenue has decreased by $157k, -14% due to operational changes. 

 

Expenditure

Personnel costs

5      Personnel costs have increased by $239k, 43%. This incorporates a general salary increase and an increase in staffing as the new configuration in the Infrastructure and Networks Group is embedded. The new structure in Waste and Environmental Solutions may further increase personnel costs, but the likely impact is unknown at this stage.

Operations and maintenance

6      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $752k, 8%. The main increase is driven from increased Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) costs at the Green Island landfill due to the increased landfill tonnage and the lifting of the subsidised rate for ETS of $960k.  Further increases are due to the increase in Envirowaste and CAA refuse bag collection of $279k, new recycling collection services for the central city area of $133k, and increased recycling service costs with Envirowaste of $186k as new properties come on to kerbside collection services.

7      The increased operations and maintenance costs have been offset by collective savings from the new Waste Management and Environmental Monitoring and Reporting contract price schedules of $655k. There is no requirement for Green Island landfill after care of $100k.

Consumables and general costs

8      Consumables and general costs have increased by $80k, 9%. This is mainly due to the increase of Ministry levies for tonnage at the Green Island landfill of $140k which is offset by external revenue. 

Fees and charges

9      Fees and charges have been categorised as ‘inclusive’ or ‘exclusive’ of ETS costs.   A copy of the fees schedule is provided at Attachment B.

10    The inclusive landfill charges include costs associated with ETS as these general waste loads contribute to landfill emissions. All waste to landfill attracts the Ministry for the Environments Waste Levy which is currently set at $10.00 per tonne, this increase is in addition to any DCC increase.

11    Exclusive landfill charges do not attract ETS costs i.e. inert materials such as rubble and 100% vegetation loads that go to composting area. Fees and charges for inert materials have been decreased in order to align with market prices as this material is beneficially used for construction and cover at the landfill.

12    Mixed and construction and demolition loads are no longer received by the landfill and the fees have been removed from the fees and charges schedule.  This is because these loads often contain materials that would attract ETS being similar in composition to general waste. There are new fees for non-hazardous tanker waste and asbestos waste.

Service Levels

13    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

14    A review of both city and residential kerbside collection services is currently underway. This review will inform the design of future collection services which will commence on 1 July 2019. The review will consider Council and community expectations and provide value for money. Potential changes in service levels may include;

a)     The introduction of organics collection (garden waste and/or food waste); and/or

b)     The introduction of a wheelie bin for the collection of colour co-mingled glass; and/or

c)     The introduction of a wheelie bin for the collection of rubbish.

15    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed at this time.

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Waste Management Group - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

172

b

Waste and Environmental Solutions - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

173

c

Waste Management Group - Draft Statement of Service Provision

175

 


SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of Waste Management primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for the Waste Management Group for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Waste Management Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Waste Management Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Waste Management Group and includes Solid Waste and Environmental Solutions activities.

2      The total capex for the Waste Management Group is $9.071 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Waste Management Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Waste Management Group includes provision for new capital projects of $6.205 million and renewal projects of $2.866 million.  It should be noted that some of the new capital projects include a component of renewals.

4      Green Island landfill’s resource consent is scheduled to expire in 2023. Provision has been made for the operating costs of securing a possible extension to this resource consent if necessary and practicable.  Capacity issues mean a new landfill or alternative waste disposal facility will be required to accommodate Dunedin’s residual waste in future, whether by Council/s, the private sector or as a joint venture.  No capital expenditure provision has been made for a new waste disposal facility.

5      A formal joint review of waste management is being undertaken with other Otago councils under section 17A of the Local Government Act 2002, and will assess regional options for the future management of waste, including possible joint venture or council controlled organisation structures.  The Solid Waste review will explore future service delivery options and will take into consideration community expectations, strategic, and economic conditions. Staff will report back to Council on completion of the review.

Major Projects

Solid Waste Renewals

6      There is $2.292 million included in the draft capex budget for Green Island Landfill Renewals.

7      There is $574k included in the draft capex budget for replacing wheelie bins, litter bins and public places recycling bins.

Green Island Landfill and Transfer Station

8      There is $2.537 million included in the draft capex budget for Green Island Landfill and Transfer Station Improvements. Work is currently underway to identify the condition of the assets at the Green Island Landfill and Transfer Station as the operational handover of the Green Island site with the new operations and maintenance contract is undertaken.

9      The draft capex budget includes provision for landfill cap improvements / composting, leachate system, health and safety improvements and landscaping.

10    Green Island Landfill and Transfer Station Improvements will enable safe recycling of a greater range of products and direct more reusable items to the reuse stores, which will reduce the costs associated with landfill disposal.

Green Island Landfill Aftercare

11    There is $2.088 million included in the draft capex budget for Green Island Landfill Aftercare. The Green Island Landfill is consented to operate until October 2023. The CAPEX budget reflects the cost associated with the closure of Green Island Landfill and not the future costs associated with landfill post closure.  The costs associated with landfill closure will come from the dedicated Landfill Aftercare Fund. The bulk of this expenditure will occur in 2023 when the consent to operate the Green Island Landfill expires. 

Landfill Gas Collection System

12    There is $760k included in the draft capex budget for improving the Landfill Gas Collection System.  The gas collection system will continue to be extended as the landfill develops, and will operate and be maintained long after Green Island landfill closure.

13    Making improvements to the landfill gas collection system will reduce Council’s Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) obligations over the medium to long term as a unique emissions factor can be applied for the collection and destruction of landfill gas.  This will provide Council and subsequently customers with less of a financial burden over time as it reduces Council’s ETS liability. These savings can then be reflected in landfill charges.

City Recycling Facilities

14    There is $360k included in the draft capex budget for building recycling facilities in the central city area in the first two years of the 10 year plan.  This project aims to give central city residents and small business operators a 24/7 option for recycling as they do not have access to kerbside collection services with the exception of cardboard.  Following on from two pilot city recycling facilities in Moray Place and Vogel Street, four more locations will be identified to build recycling facilities in other parts of the city.

15    The city recycling facilities will provide more convenient access to recycling facilities for customers and will take pressure off the current network of public places recycling bins.

Miscellaneous Projects

16    There is $200k included for the Waikouaiti Transfer Station.

17    There is $110k included for the Middlemarch Landfill and Transfer Station.

18    There is $90k included for the Forrester Park Leachate System.

19    There is $60k included for the Sawyers Bay Landfill Cap.

External Funding

20    There is no external funding for capital expenditure in the Waste Management Group.

21    External funding will be sought from the Ministry for the Environments Waste Levy Contestable Fund in the 2018/19 financial year. This money will be invested into further development opportunities, supporting greater resource recovery, including the build of a new reuse store at Waikouaiti. The community has expressed a desire to be involved in resource recovery centre operations at this site. The staged approach will support a collaborative contractor community approach to service delivery within two years of the commencement of this project.

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Waste Management - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

181

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of Waste Management primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for the Waste Management Group for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Waste Management Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Community and Planning - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budgets

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Community and Planning Group, and includes the following activities:

·           City Development

·           Community Development and Events

·           Resource Consents.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Community and Planning Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for City Planning and Community Art Gallery as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Community and Planning Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

2      The draft operating budget for 2018/19 provides for ‘business as usual’. Funding for some projects and activities included in the 2017/18 budgets for the Community and Planning Group was due to end on 30 June 2018. The continuation of funding for place-based planning and Ara Toi has been included in this draft budget.

3      There are Options Reports related to the Community and Planning Group which provide options for increased funding and improved service delivery in ecological restoration, heritage and place-based planning.

 

 

Revenue

Rates

4      Rates have increased overall in the Community and Planning Group by $190k, 2%.  

Expenditure

Personnel costs

5      Personnel costs in the Community and Planning Group have increased by $212k, 5%. This incorporates a general salary increase and an increase in full time equivalent staff (FTE) of 1.5.  Provision is made for an additional FTE in Resource Consents and a 0.5 FTE in Community Development and Events for Task Force Green subsidised volunteer supervision.

Operations and maintenance

6      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $291k, 82%.  This is primarily due to a re-categorisation of Community Development and Events expenditure.

Consumables and general costs

7      Consumables and general costs have decreased by $195k, -19%.  This is primarily due to the re-categorisation of Community Development and Events expenditure and reduced expenditure for “off” year of Masters Games.

8      The City Development budget for legal and consultancy costs has been increased by $100k for anticipated costs associated with the adoption of the second generation district plan.

Grants and subsidies

9      Grants and subsidies expenditure has increased by $96k, 3%.  This includes an increase in the biodiversity fund of $20k, an increase in arts grants of $19k and a new property arrangement grant of $40k for the Fringe Festival.

Fees and charges

10    Some of the fees and charges for activities in the Community and Planning Group have been increased, unless set by statute.  A copy of the Community and Planning Group fees schedule is provided at Attachment B.

11    Some of the deposit fees have been increased based on the current average for actual and reasonable costs.  There are new deposit fees for boundary activity notices, marginal or temporary activity notices and objections to decisions hearings. 

12    Fees for the Community Art Gallery have been increased by 4% with some rounding.

Service Levels

13    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

14    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Community and Planning - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

188

b

Community and Planning - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

189

c

Community and Planning - Draft Statement of Service Provision

194

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services and regulatory functions in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities the Community and Planning Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Community and Planning for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Community and Planning Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator



 

Community and Planning Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Community and Planning Group, and includes the following activities:

·           City Development

·           Community Development and Events.

2      The total capex for the Community and Planning Group is $3.520 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Community and Planning Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Community and Planning Group includes provision for urban design projects of $3.450 million and a small renewals budget of $70k to replace the Octagon Christmas tree. It should be noted that some of the new capital projects include a component of renewals.

4      All of the proposed projects involve a combination of maintaining existing levels of service (due to the need for renewals) and some increases in the quality of environments, which could be considered an increase over the existing level of service.

5      The capital projects included in the Community and Planning Group are developed and delivered in coordination with other council departments primarily the Transport and Parks and Recreation Groups.

Major Projects

Warehouse Precinct Upgrade

6      There is $1.400 million included in the draft capex budget for the Warehouse Precinct Upgrade in 2018/19. This will complete the capital component of Council’s Warehouse Precinct Revitalisation Plan.

7      The Warehouse Precinct Upgrade will improve service levels through amenity upgrades and improvements to footpaths, road reserves and associated infrastructure.

Street Trees and Furniture

8      There is $1.000 million included in the draft capex budget for street trees and furniture.  This will provide for street furniture (e.g., benches, bollards, etc.), urban trees and landscaping. This budget will allow a mix of larger and smaller projects, including the re-start of the centres upgrade programme with a number of Community Boards including Mosgiel and Port Chalmers having requested upgrade work in past years.

9      There is also $20k per annum included in Community and Planning’s draft operating budgets for urban trees and landscaping.

Minor Amenity Upgrades

10    There is $1.000 million included in the draft capex budget for Minor Amenity Centres Upgrades.  The aim of the Minor Amenity Upgrades is to support urban design improvements in centres outside the central city area by including additional hard and soft landscaping treatments that do not qualify for NZTA funding.

11    The series of Minor Amenity Upgrades will increase the level of service in town centres outside of the central city area.

Miscellaneous Projects

12    There is $50k included in 2019 for the Caversham BBQ/Picnic Hub – a new community asset making use of a donated structure.

13    There is $70k included in 2021 to replace the artificial Christmas tree in the Octagon.  It was originally envisaged that it be replaced in 2013 (after ten years use).

Related capital projects

14    Capital expenditure related to the Community and Planning Group included in other Council budgets include:

·           Central City Upgrade (included in the Roading and Footpaths capex budget).

·           City to Waterfront Bridge (included in the Roading and Footpaths capex budget).

·           Tertiary Precinct Upgrade (included in the Roading and Footpaths capex budget).

·           Major Centres Upgrades (included in the Roading and Footpaths capex budget).

External Funding

15    There is no external funding for capital expenditure for the Community and Planning Group.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Community and Planning - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

201

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services and regulatory functions in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities the Community and Planning Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for Community and Planning for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Community and Planning Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Economic Development - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Enterprise Dunedin

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for Economic Development, and includes the following activities:

·           Destination Dunedin

·           Economic Development

·           Dunedin i-Site Visitor Centre (Visitor Centre).

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 draft operating budget for the Economic Development Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Economic Development as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Economic Development Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

2      The draft operating budget for 2018/19 provides for ‘business as usual’. Funding for some projects and activities included in the 2017/18 budgets for the Economic Development Group was due to end on 30 June 2018. The continuation of funding for food resilience, energy plan and Ara Toi has been included in this draft budget.

3      Funding for Gigcity was included in the 2017/18 budget.  There is no specific funding for Gigcity included in the draft opex budget in line with the Chorus funding. Central Government intends to establish a Centre of Digital Excellence (CODE) in Dunedin at a cost of $10.000 million over ten years.  Staff will report to Council in 2018 when more is known as to how this may relate to future Council funding in the smart city space.

Revenue

Rates

4      Rates have increased overall in the Economic Development Group by $240k, 5%.

External revenue

5      External revenue has increased by $57k, 5%. This is partly due to increased rental and staffing recoveries from Department of Conservation and increased commissions in the Visitor Centre and Destination Dunedin contributions for trade events and marketing.

Expenditure

Personnel costs

6      Personnel costs have increased by $70k, 3%. This incorporates a provision for salary increases and a reduction in full time equivalent (FTE) staff of 0.5.

7      The net decrease in FTE is due to scheduled reductions in Economic Development of 2.0 staff for GigCity and International Relations advisor positions and increases of 0.5 FTE in Visitor Centre for a Trade and Study Host and 1.0 FTE in Economic Development for a Business Analyst position.

Operations and maintenance

8      Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $383k, 30%. This is due to increased expenditure for Study Dunedin of $67k and the Energy Plan implementation of $87k.  The remaining increase is due to a re-categorisation of expenditure lines.

Consumables and general costs

9      Consumables and general costs have decreased by $221k, -20% due to a
re-categorisation of expenditure lines between categories.

Fees and Charges

10    Fees and charges for Economic Development have not been changed. A copy of the fees schedule for Economic Development is provided at Attachment B.

11    The Council requested a review of the film fee as part of the development of the 10 year plan.  Staff reviewed the film fee structure and considers that the fee is appropriate, and discretion will be used on waiving the fee in appropriate circumstances.

Service Levels

12    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

13    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes proposed for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

 

Signatories

Author:

John Christie - Director Enterprise Dunedin

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Economic Development - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

208

b

Economic Development - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

209

c

Economic Development - Draft Statement of Service Provision

210

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities in the Economic Development Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for the Economic Development Group for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Economic Development Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Governance and Support Services - 2018/19 Draft Operating Budget

Department: Finance and Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for year one of the 10 year plan (essentially the 2018/19 Annual Plan) for the Governance and Support Services Group and includes these activities:

·           Business Information Services (BIS)

·           Civic and Administration (including Civil Defence)

·           Corporate Leadership

·           Corporate Policy

·           Council Communications and Marketing (CCM)

·           Customer Services Agency (CSA)

·           Finance

·           Fleet Operations

·           Human Resources (HR)

·           Investment Account

·           Waipori Fund

·           Warm Dunedin.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community:

i)      The draft 2018/19 operating budget for the Governance and Support Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

ii)     The draft 2018/19 fees and charges schedules for Administration Services and Information Services as shown/amended at Attachment B.

iii)    The draft statement of service provision for the Governance and Support Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment C.

 

Operating Budgets

2      The draft operating budget for 2018/19 provides for ‘business as usual’. Funding for Te Ao Tūroa Environment Strategy was due to end on 30 June 2018. The continuation of funding for Te Ao Tūroa Environment Strategy has been included in this draft budget.

Revenue

External revenue

3      External revenue has increased by $1.427 million, 12%. A breakdown is provided in the table below.

4      The increase in revenue from the Waipori Fund of $1.700 million is to reflect the inflation adjustment that is projected to occur in the 2018/19 year.  Historically, the Waipori Fund budget has only included the revenue that is distributed to the Council.

5      The Dunedin City Holdings Limited (DCHL) revenue is from interest on the shareholder advance.  It has been reduced to align to the DCHL Statement of Intent.

Internal revenue

6      Internal revenue has increased by $820k, 3%. 

 

Expenditure

Personnel costs

7      Personnel costs for the Governance and Support Services Group have reduced by $435k, -3%.  A breakdown is provided in the table below by cost and then by full time equivalent (FTE) staff number. 

8      The Governance and Support Services staff budget has increased by $1.106 million, 8%. This increase incorporates a general salary increase and an increase of 5.6 FTEs.

9      The increase in FTEs include: 2.0 FTE in the Policy Team to cover community liaison and bylaw reviews; 1.0 FTE contract management resource to support the overall Council procurement function; 1.0 FTE additional communications advisor; and 1.0 FTE to support Human Resources activity across the Council.  The remaining 0.6 FTE relates to minor changes across the remaining activities.

10    The 2017/18 budget included provision for an additional 6.0 FTE, $471k and provision for a general staff increase of $500k.  These budgets have now been allocated across the organisation. 

11    The vacancy allowance budget has been increased from $530k (equivalent to 7.0 FTEs) to $1.100 million (equivalent to 14.0 FTEs). This budget reflects savings that arise due to staff turnover and the normal delay in fillings vacancies when they arise.  The budget is increased in the 2018/19 year due to the increase in staffing levels across the organisation.

Operations and maintenance

12    Operations and maintenance costs have decreased by $147k, -3%.  This saving primarily reflects the removal of a centrally held maintenance and insurance budgets in the 2017/18 financial year. 

13    These budget changes have been partially offset by increased costs associated with the outsourcing of IT services.  These services were previously provided by the BIS department but when services were outsourced they didn’t form part of the original contract.  This cost relates to IT engineering services required as part of application upgrades.

Consumables and general costs

14    Consumables and general costs have increased by $423k, 5%. The primary reason for the increase is a centrally held allowance for professional fees for the development of the Central City Plan ($500k). 

15    The increase has been partially offset by the removal of the Otago Rural Fire District levy budget (no longer required) and audit expenses associated with the 10 year plan (only budgeted every three years).

Fees and charges

16    Fees and charges for Administration Services and Archives have not been changed. Fees for hazard information reports and residential land information memorandums have been increased by around 2.7% - 3.5% (allowing for some rounding).  A copy of the fees schedule for the Governance and Support Services Group is provided at Attachment B.

Service Levels

17    A 10 year plan must, in relation to each group of activities, include a statement of the intended levels of service provision which specifies any performance measures and targets.

18    Proposed level of service statements, measures and targets are provided at Attachment C.  Any proposed changes for the next 10 year plan are marked in red.  No significant changes have been proposed.

19    It should be noted that level of service for Civil Defence and Emergency Management is proposed to be deleted, as this activity has now transitioned to the Otago Regional Council following a service review under section 17A of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Signatories

Author:

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Tami  Sargeant  - Senior Policy Analyst

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Acting Chief Financial Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Governance and Support Services - Draft 2018/19 Operating Budget

217

b

Governance and Support Services - Draft 2018/19 Fees and Charges Schedule

218

c

Governance and Support Services – Draft Statement of Service Provision

219

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the 10 year plan operational expenditure budgets enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The Governance and Support Services Group contributes to the delivery of all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 30 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 Year Plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for the Governance and Support Services Group for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets and will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Governance and Support Services Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

PDF Creator



 


 

Governance and Support Services Draft 10-Year Capital Budget

Department: Finance and Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report includes information on the proposed 10-year capital expenditure (capex) programme for the Governance and Support Services Group and includes these activities:

·           Business Information Services (BIS)

·           Customer Services Agency

·           Fleet Operations.

2      The total capex for the Governance and Support Services Group is $34.659 million.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts for the purposes of developing the 10 Year Plan 2018-28 and consulting with the community, the draft 2018-28 capital budget for the Governance and Support Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

 

10 year capital programme

3      The draft 10 year capex budget for the Governance and Support Services Group includes provision for renewal projects of $27.509 million and new capital projects of $7.150 million.

4      The 10 year capital programme for the Governance and Support Services Group provides for the continuation of the current delivery of service for all activities, with the replacement of essential equipment for service delivery and customer service.

Major projects

IT systems

5      There is $24.063 million included in the draft capex budget to maintain existing IT systems.  This includes replacing hardware, and upgrading each of the key software applications annually.  This maintenance programme will also take into account the consolidation of multiple systems being used in different departments such as the three asset management systems and multiple collection databases.

6      In addition this budget provides funding to replace five of Council’s ten core operating systems. Three of these applications have become costly to maintain and require heavy manual intervention to operate effectively.  The core rates and regulatory system is also overdue to be reviewed for significant upgrade to cloud or full replacement.  It is intended that each of these replacements will reduce operating costs across the organisation through reduced manual intervention and streamlining of processes, improving mobility for staff and increased self-service options for public.

7      There is $6.500 million included in the draft capex budget for providing new business systems to operational staff.  This programme of work will focus on the introduction of new tools such as Business Intelligence Analysis and Reporting and modern communication tools such as video conferencing and visual equipment for presentations.

Vehicle Replacement

8      There is $3.446 million included in the draft capex budget for vehicle replacement. This budget allows for the continuation of the fleet upgrades to electric vehicles.  The Council expects to purchase two or three electrical vehicles each year at an approximate cost of $80k to $100k per annum.

Bookbus Replacement

9      There is $600k included in the draft capex budget for the Bookbus replacement in the first year of the 10 year plan.  This amount is considered adequate to provide equivalent service by utilising one or more new mobile library vehicles, operating more efficiently and reliably to a more targeted timetable.

10    In March 2017, the Council initiated a review of the mobile library services currently provided two Bookbuses operated by the Dunedin Public Libraries. The review was initiated because both vehicles are now over 26 years old with increased maintenance requirements and service disruption. There have also been significant changes in technology, customer service and usage patterns since the Bookbuses were first commissioned which could impact the current service. In addition, the current Bookbus timetable has each vehicle only operating during 40% of its potential available time, and is in need of a major revamp.

11    In terms of the vehicle replacement options, it is also intended to explore the availability of suitable electric vehicles, and potential EECA funding support, to provide a more efficient and sustainable longer term mobile library service.

External Funding

12    There is no external funding for capital expenditure for the Governance and Support Services Group.

13    Options will be investigated with regards to the Bookbus replacement project.  There may be potential EECA external funding support available.

 

Signatories

Author:

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Tami  Sargeant  - Senior Policy Analyst

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Acting Chief Financial Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Governance and Support Services - Draft 2018-28 Capital Budget

227

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the 10 year plan capital expenditure budgets enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The 10 year plan 2018-2028 capital expenditure will contribute to the delivery of all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 30 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 Year Plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budgets for the Governance and Support Services Group for inclusion in the 10 year plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The significance of the draft budgets will be considered in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in developing the draft budgets for the Governance and Support Services Group. 

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the draft budgets; and Community Boards will be involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2018-2028.

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 



Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Capital Budget Option - City to Waterfront Connection

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to present building and funding options for the construction of a central city to waterfront connection.

2      The options presented in this report for the construction of the city to waterfront connection are:

·           Substantial investment: $20 million for an architectural bridge;

·           Moderate investment: $6-10 million for a basic bridge, underpass, or additions to the existing Jetty Street bridge;

·           Current investment: no funding for a new city to waterfront connection. 

3      A total of $20 million is included in the draft capital expenditure budget for the city to waterfront connection.

4      If the Council decides on a preferred option and assesses the decision as significant, legislation requires that the preferred option and other options be consulted on though the 10 year plan consultation document.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the options presented in the report titled ‘Capital Budget Option – City to Waterfront Connection’.

b)     Decides the Council’s preferred option for inclusion in the draft 10 year plan budget.

c)     Considers whether to include the Council’s preferred option and any other options in the 10 year plan consultation document, after assessing the significance of the preferred option.   

 

BACKGROUND

5      Dunedin’s harbour is one of the city’s many great assets.  However the waterfront area closest to the central city and adjacent to the Steamer Basin is currently difficult to access.  The area generally lacks the kind of amenity for residents, visitors and businesses which now exist in other New Zealand and international cities. 

6      Directly connecting the central city and the harbour and improving the amenity around the Steamer Basin has been a focus for Dunedin residents for more than a decade and there have been a wide variety of plans during that time looking at how that might be achieved. 

7      In 2006 a bridge designed by Architecture Van Brandenburg formed part of a plan for the area.  While there was significant support for the idea of reconnecting the central city and harbour and for increasing amenity, there was also concern expressed by the Chamber of Commerce and other sectors regarding residential and commercial uses encroaching upon a key central city industrial area, and attracting commercial activity away from George Street. 

8      Eventually, a proposal focussed on the Steamer Basin and the area south of the Steamer Basin, with staging provisions to manage impacts was included in the District Plan and formed the starting point for the Harbourside zone in the Council’s 2nd Generation District Plan.

Current level of service

9      Existing links include the level-crossing at St Andrew Street, a heritage pedestrian bridge over the railway tracks behind the Railway Station and a route across Castle Street and Wharf Street via the Jetty Street road bridge.  These existing connections present a number of physical and psychological barriers, including accessibility for cyclists or mobility impaired users, delay and directness of route, and safety issues.

10    While the community generally values the harbour as a city amenity access to the wharves is restricted and there is limited access to the water for recreational use. 

11    Existing uses around the Steamer Basin are largely for storage and some offices, with the restaurant in the Customhouse building and Monarch cruises the only public uses.              

DISCUSSION

Funding rationale

12    The aim of the connection is to improve the links between the city centre and waterfront. 

13    An improved cycle connection will help recreational and commuter cyclists from the Peninsula and South Dunedin residential area access the city centre.  It will complement the Peninsula shared path once complete. 

14    An accessible pedestrian and cycle link across the rail line will also improve connectivity by overcoming issues of severance.  This will also contribute to improved safety outcomes as the conflict between modes will be reduced.

A vision to revitalise Dunedin’s waterfront 

15    Architecture Van Brandenburg has refined its earlier bridge design as part of a vision for transforming the waterfront area around the Steamer Basin.  This new vision has prompted high-level discussions with the Otago Regional Council, Port Otago, Ngai Tahu and Otago University and the Dunedin City Council.  The other parties have confirmed support in principle for the vision and expressed interest in progressing key elements. 

16    The bridge is a key element to opening up the area by creating the missing connection.  Other key elements include a public walkway around the harbour edge with new public spaces created; a hotel and cultural centre; an Antarctic marine centre and public aquarium; and offices for Port Otago.  The vision also potentially includes realigning Wharf Street and the off ramp from the Jetty Street Overbridge to create a new development site and public amenity area at the head of the Steamer Basin. 

17    There has been publicity around the vision and broad support from the communtiy for the idea.  The model of the vision, including the bridge, is currently on public display in Toitu.

18    In addition to encouraging redevelopment of the waterfront, a new or improved connection would also benefit the developing Warehouse Precinct and other land use change around the Queens Garden area. 

Strategic fit

19    The City to Waterfront connection is part of the Dunedin Strategic Cycle Network identified in the Dunedin City Integrated Transport Strategy.

20    The Spatial Plan identifies development of a safe permanent connection for pedestrians and cyclists between the central city and the Steamer Basin within its actions for implementation relating to the public realm

21    The connection is also identified in the Council’s Central City Plan as a key transformational project. 

OPTIONS

22    An initial assessment various bridge crossing options was undertaken as part of the business case process required for New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) funding.

23    This assessment did not include two potential options:

·      Discussions were previously held with KiwiRail on the possibility of reopening the level crossing at Rattray Street. KiwiRail is firm this is not an option, and as a result the focus has been on other options for providing the connection.

·      An underpass option has been explored to some degree, reviewing work previously undertaken to investigate that option and as a result not progressed further.

24    Architecture Van Brandenburg has also provided a Quantity Surveyor estimate of the construction costs for their bridge design and associated amenities. 

25    A high level peer review of these costings has been undertaken for the Transport Group by Opus.  The Opus review assessed a range of options for over ground connections including: upgrading the existing Jetty Street (Cumberland Street) overbridge. 

26    Cost estimates for the various options are shown below:

Options

Estimated cost

Likely DCC funding (subject to other funders e.g. NZTA)

Architectural bridge and amenities at Rattray Street

$20M

$14.5

Basic bridge (Rattray Street)

$10M

$4.5M

Improved connection at Jetty Street

$6M

$3M

 

27    Initial discussions have been held with the NZTA (jointly with the Otago Regional Council and Port Otago).  NZTA has confirmed it will consider contributing subject to a business case.  This work is underway and the amount is likely to be around 55% funding for a basic bridge ($5.5 million) and for an architectural bridge, and around $3 million if the work is simply improving the connection at Jetty Street. 

28    Development on the connection could commence immediately from 2018/19, beginning with work on feasibility, planning and design development.  However the development could be delayed until there is commitment from other parties to fund one of the other key elements of the waterfront vision, such as the hotel, cultural centre or public aquarium.

Option One –Substantial investment: architectural bridge  

29    This option would see the construction an architectural bridge to provide the waterfront connection.  The estimated project budget is $20 million, based on Quantity Surveyor estimates of construction costs for the bridge and associated amenities.

Advantages

·           Provides easy, direct and safe access to the waterfront for pedestrians and cyclists.

·           Creates connections between the Steamer Basin and the Central City, and Warehouse Precinct.

·           Responds to community requests for better access to the waterfront.

·           Aligns with the goals of various Council strategies by providing accessibility and new public amenities, and incorporating creative and sustainability elements.

·           Links with the cycle network, e.g. wider peninsula connections.

·           Provides a potential catalyst for economic revitalisation of Dunedin’s waterfront

·           Creates a compelling landmark to boost tourism and economic growth.

·           New open spaces and spaces within the structures offer potential to complement the Chinese Garden.

Disadvantages

·           Risk of building a bridge to an area which may not follow through with revitalisation plans.

·           Significant costs associated with the construction of the architectural bridge.

Option Two – Moderate investment: basic bridge, underpass or improvements to Jetty Street bridge

30    This option would see a moderate investment to construct a basic bridge, underpass or make improvements to the existing Jetty Street bridge.  The estimated project budget is between $6-$10 million based on the cost estimates provided by the Opus review.

Advantages

·           Provides easy, direct and safe access to the waterfront for pedestrians and cyclists.

·           Creates connections between the Steamer Basin and the Central City, and Warehouse Precinct.

·           Links with the cycle network, e.g. wider peninsula connections.

·           Responds to community requests for better access to the waterfront.

·           Aligns with the goals of various Council strategies by providing accessibility.

·           Provides a catalyst for economic revitalisation of Dunedin’s waterfront.

·           Improvements to Jetty Street bridge can be completed in a shorter timeframe than building a new bridge.

·           Lower cost option than the architectural bridge.

Disadvantages

·           Does not provide new open spaces and amenitites.

·           Limited opportunities for integrating art and creativity in infrastructure.

·           Unlikely to contribute significantly to revitalisation of the waterfront.

·           May not meet the community's expectations of better access to the waterfront.

·           Feasibility of relocating underground services for the underpass option is unknown. 

·           Jetty Street option is not on desire line for connection.

Option Three – Current investment: no new connection 

31    This option would see no allocation of funding in the draft 10 year plan for a city to waterfront connection for pedestrians and cyclists. 

Advantages

·           Budgeted cost can be excluded from the draft 10 year plan budget. 

Disadvantages

·           Identified problems of poor access and severance continue.

·           A longstanding community aspiration is not addressed. 

NEXT STEPS

32    If the Council decides to consult on this issue, the options and preferred option will be included in the 10 year plan consultation document.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and provides local infrastructure and public service and is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Creating a connection will contribute to a number of Council's strategies.  It will contribute to objectives of providing accessibility, creating safe, well-connected networks, and having a vibrant, exciting city that enables a prosperous economy.  If the structure integrates art and creativity into the design, it will also contribute to creating a vibrant and memorable city with exciting public art.  The Central City Plan lists the connection as a key transformational project.

Māori Impact Statement

Ngai Tahu has had initial discussions with Architecture Van Brandenburg and some suggested changes have been incorporated into designs to reflect local elements. 

Sustainability

The architectural bridge option is intended to incorporate sustainability design elements. 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in this report.

Significance

The matter is considered of medium to high significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy given the cost and level of public interest. 

Engagement – external

There has been engagement with key stakeholders including, Otago Regional Council, NZTA, Port Otago, University of Otago and Ngai Tahu.  A number of other groups including neighbouring landowners/occupiers: Chinese Garden Trust, KiwRail, Customhouse and Russell Lund, owner of the Loan and Mercantile building.  All have expressed support with the exception of Russell Lund who has expressed concern about the scale and location of the bridge. 

Engagement - internal

Internal activities involved include: Transportation (Group Manager), Community and Planning (Group Manager and City Development Manager) and Manager of the Chinese Garden. 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Potential risks include the construction costs exceeding the QS estimates and other stakeholders not delivering the other elements of the vision within the desired timescale. 

Conflict of Interest

There is no known conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no specific implications for Community Boards. West Harbour and Otago Peninsula Boards have an expressed interest in the wider vision for the waterfront. 

 

 


Council

11 December 2017

 

 

 

Capital Budget Option - Central City Plan

Department: Community and Planning and Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to provide options for progressing delivery of the Central City Plan over the period of the 10 year plan.

2      The options presented in this report are for road, footpath and streetscape renewals and upgrades:

·           Substantial investment: $60 million across the central city allowing consistently for very high or high quality upgrades (this is provided for in the draft budget).

·           Moderate investment: $35 million across the central city requiring a mix of high and moderate quality upgrades (this reflects the option adopted in the 2015 Long Term Plan).

·           Current investment (renewals only): $8 million across the central city, focused only on necessary renewals and reusing existing streetscape fittings.

3      The draft 10 year plan capital expenditure budget includes $60 million for Central City Plan road, footpath and streetscape renewals and upgrades.  Below-ground water infrastructure renewals in the central city are funded in relevant Three Waters budgets. 

4      If the Council decides on a preferred option and assesses the decision as significant, legislation requires that the preferred option and other options be consulted upon though the 10 year plan consultation document.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the options presented in the report titled ‘Capital Budget Option – Central City Plan.’

b)     Decides the Council’s preferred option for inclusion in the draft 10 year plan budget.

c)     Considers whether to include the Council’s preferred option and any other options in the 10 year plan consultation document, after assessing the significance of the preferred option.

 

 


 

BACKGROUND

Current level of service

5      The Dunedin Central City Plan (CCP) was adopted by the Council in 2015 to guide redevelopment of key city precincts over the next 10-15 years. 

6      The CCP informed 2015 Long Term Plan project budgets, with $37.3 million allocated from 2018/19 onwards including $2.4m in Three Waters renewals (or approximately $35 million excluding Three Waters renewals) and $8 million in New Zealand Transport Agency subsidies. 

7      The CCP responds to the need to renew the central city’s below-ground water infrastructure and improve road safety and access for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. 

8      The CCP also creates a platform for the first major streetscape improvements in more than two decades, from new paving, street furniture, lighting and public art, to create a more vibrant central city.     

9      The implementation of the Warehouse Precinct Revitalisation Plan, through projects such as the Jetty and Bond Streets upgrades, is essentially the first stage of CCP works.

DISCUSSION

Funding rationale

Project delivery

10    Four projects have been identified for delivery in the first five years of the CCP.  The four projects in order of priority are:

·           George Street (commencing at Albany Street and heading south to the Octagon);

·           Lower Stuart Street and Bath Street;

·           Princess Street and Rattray Street to State Highway 1 (SH1); and

·           Exchange Square.

11    To enable more efficient design and delivery, Princes Street and Rattray Street to SH1 and Exchange Square will become one geographically linked package.

12    The priority of the four projects has been identified based on the priority of the planned below-ground Three Waters infrastructure renewals in, or connected to, the central city. 

13    Below-ground infrastructure must be renewed to a higher standard of resilience, and provide for ongoing maintenance.  This allows below-ground access to be designed and constructed before road or footpath renewals begin.  Sound subsurface preparation will also provide a durable platform for improved streetscapes and open spaces.

14    These projects have been selected as they integrate with existing and planned uses, supporting:

·           the City to Waterfront Connection (discussed in a separate report);

·           pedestrian connections to Anzac Square and Toitu and the Warehouse Precinct;

·           heritage restorations including the Justice Precinct;

·           cycleways on State Highway 1 and around Otago Harbour;

·           Otago Regional Council’s existing bus network and new bus hub; and,

·           future Octagon improvements, including early steps such as repaving necessary to respond to immediate safety concerns (estimated at a cost of $2 million).

15    Alongside Council’s own networks, other future infrastructure investments by third parties need to be considered (e.g. investigation into the future for district heating).

16    As the Warehouse Precinct has shown, private investment in redevelopment can be encouraged by public investment in streetscape transformation. 

Urban design standards

17    Opportunity exists to apply different standards of above-ground streetscape upgrades, with a range of design, quality and cost choices. 

18    Four broad standards have been identified to provide indicative cost ranges for 10 year plan budget purposes only and are categorised as follows:

·           Very high quality upgrades estimated to cost $2,500 per square metre on average.

·           High quality upgrades estimated to cost $1,000 per square metre on average.

·           Moderate upgrades estimated to cost $500 per square metre on average.

·           Renewals (like-for-like replacements with minor improvements) estimated to cost $250 per square metre on average – not shown below.

19    Indicative costs for each of the four projects at the different standards are as follows:

 

Very high

High

Moderate

George Street, between Albany Street and Moray Place (11,260m2)

$28.2m

$11.3m

$5.6m

Lower Stuart Street (6,000m2)

$15m

$6m

$3m

Bath Street (1,500m2)

20    Exchange Square (875m2)

$3.8m

$2.2m

$1.5m

$0.9m

$0.75m

$0.44m

Princes Street between Rattray Street and Moray Place; Rattray Street to SH1 (9,000m2)

$22.5m

$9m

$4.5m

 

21    These standards could be applied consistently across the central city.  Alternatively, these standards could be applied on a project by project basis to closely reflect the primary uses the upgrades are intended to support and at a more moderate cost.  This is reflected in the difference between Options One and Two of this report. 

Timeframes and funding

22    Project planning is underway and the phasing of the work is reflected in the draft budget.  It is expected to take approximately eighteen months to complete the design framework, consultation, concept design, procurement and detailed design before construction on the first package of work can commence.

23    Funding will come from a mixture of rates and borrowing, and will be applied in conjunction with funding from external agencies such as the New Zealand Transport Agency.

24    Ongoing maintenance and depreciation costs may increase as a result of the higher level of service (estimated at 10% of capital comprising 3% maintenance and 7% depreciation) depending on options selected.