Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ten Year Plan Deliberations will be held on:

 

Date/Time:                   Monday 14 May 2018, 11.00 am

                                      Tuesday 15 May 2018, 9.00 am

                                      Wednesday 16 May 2018, 9.00 am

                                      Thursday 17 May 2018, 9.00 am

Venue:                          Edinburgh Room, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Ten Year Plan Deliberations

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Dave Cull

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Staynes

 

Members

David Benson-Pope

Rachel Elder

 

Christine Garey

Doug Hall

 

Aaron Hawkins

Marie Laufiso

 

Mike Lord

Damian Newell

 

Jim O'Malley

Conrad Stedman

 

Lee Vandervis

Andrew Whiley

 

Kate Wilson

 

 

Senior Officer                               Sue Bidrose (Chief Executive Officer)

 

Governance Support Officer      Lynne Adamson, Sharon Bodeker, Wendy Collard, Pam Jordan, Jennifer Lapham and Rebecca Murray

 

 

 

Pam Jordan

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Pam.jordan@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                   PAGE

 

1        Outline of Proceedings                                                                                4

2        Apologies                                                                                                  4

3        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                              4

4        Declaration of Interest                                                                                5

5        Confirmation of Minutes                                                                             19

5.1   Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations meeting - 9 April 2018                     19     

Part A Reports (Committee  has power to decide these matters)

6          Late Submissions                                                                                      20

7        Overview of Community Engagement on the 10 Year Plan                                22

8        Financial Strategy and Financial Policies - Summary of Community Feedback       38

9        Tracking Progress on the Key Principles - Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and Sustainability                                                                                           45

10      Partnership with Iwi                                                                                  52

11      Carbon Assessment of 10 Year Plan Proposals                                               56

12      Budget Option - Place-Based Community Grants Scheme                                112

13      Budget Option - Bridge / City to Waterfront Connection                                  118

14      Budget Option - Central City Upgrade                                                          127

15      Budget Option - Tertiary Precinct                                                               135

16      Budget Option - Mosgiel Pool                                                                     142

17      3 Waters - Summary of Community Feedback                                             149

18      Roading and Footpaths - Summary of Community Feedback                           154

19      Reserves and Recreational Facilities - Summary of Community Feedback          159

20      Property - Summary of Community Feedback                                              166

21      Libraries and Museums - Summary of Community Feedback                           170

22      Regulatory Services - Summary of Community Feedback                               176

23      Waste Management - Summary of Community Feedback                               181

24      Community and Planning - Summary of Community Feedback                         185

25      Economic Development - Summary of Community Feedback                          192

26      Governance and Support Services - Summary of Community Feedback            197

27      Adoption of 2018/19 Fees and Charges                                                       202

28      Completion of Deliberations and Decision-making                                          243            

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                           246

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

1     OUTLINE OF PROCEEDINGS

Mayor Cull to outline proceedings for meeting.

2     Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.

 

To be moved:

 

"That any resolution made in this section of the meeting, pursuant to Standing Order 3.8.18 may be subject to further discussion and decision by the meeting."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Council Register of Interests as at 9 May 2018

7

  



Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a staff member and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Staff members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Executive Leadership Team's Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for the Executive Leadership Team's Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

ELT Register of Interests as at 9 May 2018

17

  



Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

Confirmation of Minutes

Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations meeting - 9 April 2018

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations meeting held on 9 April 2018 as a correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations meeting  held on 9 April 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

     


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

Part A Reports

 

Late Submissions

Department: Civic

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      Submissions to the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan closed on Monday 23 April 2018.  Sixteen submissions have been received since the closing date.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Considers whether or not to accept the late submissions received. 

 

BACKGROUND

2      Submissions to the draft 2018-2028 Long Term Plan closed on 23 April 2018.  There were 1,839 submissions received by the close off date, and 16 submissions have been received since that time.  Please note that submissions postmarked prior to the closing date were accepted.

DISCUSSION

3      All of the late submissions received were tagged as late submissions, and have not been assigned topics.  No new topics have been introduced in the late submissions received from:

Name

Submission Number

Alex McAlpine

652059

Matthew and Katey Jenks

651995

M Morris

651993

Janet Rutherford

651383

Andrew Henderson

651380

Graham Potter

651349

Graeme and Fiona Crutchley

651270

Ben Dillon

651268

Jacqueline Gordon

651263

Brian O'Brien

651167

Arthur Didham

651165

Margaret Eastwood

651163

Anonymous

651048

Diane Kennedy

651042

 


 

 

4      New topics have been introduced in the following late submissions:

·      Kurt Bowen, NZ Institute of Surveyors (652010) – discusses a Vauxhall – Waverley Bay Upper Harbour recreation concept produced in 1989/1990.  The concept goes further than a widening of Portobello Road.

·      Fiona Jakobs (651174) - requesting a new footpath be constructed at the top of Signal Hill Road, extending to the monuments and mountain bike track. 

OPTIONS

5      Council needs to give consideration as to whether or not to accept the late submissions recieved.

6      As this is an administrative report, it is not necessary to provide a summary of considerations.

 

Signatories

Author:

Sharon Bodeker - Team Leader Civic

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Overview of community engagement on the 10 year plan

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The Council adopted an ambitious draft 10 year plan, including substantial new investments in an architectural bridge, the central city and the tertiary precinct.  At the same time the Council’s draft budgets provided for the increased costs of the day to day activities which keep the city safe and well maintained, and funded major projects to alleviate the increasing risks of flooding and improve road safety.

2      If the Council determines to do everything in the draft 10 year plan, the total capital investment in assets and infrastructure will be around $854 million over 10 years, and the total operating costs for providing day-to-day services will be around $253 million in the next financial year.  The Council will need to increase rates by 7.3% in the first year of the plan, raise debt to a maximum of $285 million over the 10 years of the plan, and identify and sell properties that are not making an appropriate return or that do not fit with the Council’s overall strategic direction.

3      Community interest in these matters and the use of new, more accessible consultation materials and channels saw a high level of community engagement on this 10 year plan, with 5,661 separate items of feedback received, with some key themes:

·           There was considerable support for investing in a bridge and upgrading the central city and tertiary precinct areas.  However the level of support for investment between the moderate or substantial options varied between the proposals.  

·           Some respondents expressed concern about the impacts of proposed rate increases, particularly for older ratepayers on fixed incomes.

·           Some respondents suggested prioritising core service roading and waters projects and a larger investment in a new Mosgiel Pool over the investments intended to improve the ‘look and feel’ of the city.

4      A summary of the community feedback received on the four options the Council consulted upon are outlined in reports.  A report on the new Mosgiel Pool is provided given the amount of community feedback the Council received on this project.

5      Other matters raised during consultation concerning specific Council activities, including requests for additional funding, are addressed in the relevant Group reports on this agenda. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the report titled ‘Overview of community engagement on the 10 year plan.’

 

 

BACKGROUND

6      The 10 year plan sets the direction for the DCC for the next 10 years. It sets out the services and activities the Council will provide, the projects we will carry out and the level of service the community can expect. The plan also includes how much we expect things to cost, how we’ll pay for them and what that means for rates and debt.

Engagement process and results

7      Engagement to enable the community to have their say occurred in a five and a half week consultation period between Wednesday 14 March and Monday 23 April 2018. Details of the engagement process are described in Attachment A.

8      A plain-English consultation document titled ‘Investing in our great small city: Te Whakatāpae I tēnei taone’ was developed to present a fair summary of, and support community engagement on, the content of the draft 10 year plan.  The community provided positive feedback about the consultation document being easy to understand and widely available. 

9      A total of 5,661 feedback items were received during the consultation period. This included 1,704 feedback forms (including 381 in hardcopy), 1,025 Toitū postcards and 2,410 social media comments.  A detailed breakdown of sources is provided in the table below:

Feedback by source

 Number received

Notes

Feedback forms

      1,704

Completed using the online form (1,323) and handwritten (381) using the consultation document form

Letters

         10

Letter addressed to Chief Executive Officer

Email

         22

Emails received at the dcc@dcc.govt.nz  and  the annual.plan@dcc.govt.nz addresses

Toitū postcards

     1,025

Postcard available at the Van Brandenburg display at Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

Event feedback

       199

Notes taken by staff and postcards completed at events

Generic feedback postcards

       120

Postcards completed at displays or during community organisation engagement activity

People's Panel survey

       151

People's Panel  membership was 1,301 as at 14 March 2018

Touchscreen

         20

150 respondents started to use the touchscreen only 20 completed

Social media

     2,410

Comments on Facebook and Twitter and responses to Twitter polls:

 

 

 

 

Social media comments:

503

Poll responses:
City to waterfront bridge: 1,200 responses
Central city upgrade: 409 responses
Tertiary precinct project: 298 responses

1,907

Total:

     5,661

Total:

2,410

 

10    Feedback comments were received on 101 topics. The 20 most commented on topics  were:

Topic

Number of Comments

Mosgiel Pool

427

Bridge / city to waterfront connection

328

Rates

261

Central city upgrade

206

Cycleways

204

Harbourside / waterfront vision

173

Tertiary precinct

117

Transport improvements

116

Public transport

81

Storm water improvements

80

Climate change adaptation and planning

79

Place-based groups

75

Transport - operational

67

LED lights and streetlights

65

Debt

64

Infrastructure strategy

64

Parks and recreation improvements

57

75+ parking fee

54

South Dunedin community hub

52

Economic development and employment

51

 

11    Attachment A provides further information about the results of consultation including a table showing all feedback topics and number of comments made sorted by topic alphabetically.

12    Feedback from all sources was recorded in the Council’s consultation database for analysis and comment by staff and consideration by the Council.

Discussion

13    As always there was a wide spectrum of community views expressed on the 10 year plan.  Some respondents supported the ambition of the 10 year plan and suggested the Council focus on ‘getting it done.’  Some respondents did not support the projects or the ambition of the plan.  Some respondents questioned the affordability of the plan and suggested a greater focus on core infrastructure services.  Some submissions questioned the deliverability of the plan.

Major projects and infrastructure

14    There was considerable support for investing in a bridge and upgrading the central city and tertiary precinct areas.  However the level of support for investment between the moderate or substantial options varied between the proposals.  

15    Some respondents suggested prioritising core service roading and waters projects and a larger investment in a new Mosgiel Pool over the investments intended to improve the ‘look and feel’ of the city. Other comments on general infrastructure supported greater emphasis on climate change responses, particularly in South Dunedin. 

16    The 10 year plan includes the Council’s draft Infrastructure Strategy, which identifies our significant infrastructure issues for the next 50 years including: renewing and replacing assets; responding to growth or decline in demand; public health and environmental outcomes; resilience to natural hazards; and levels of service.

17    Like many councils we have ageing infrastructure assets, such as water and wastewater pipes that need to be replaced and properties that must be maintained. Renewals expenditure represents 70% of the draft 10 year capital budget.

18    Other major projects are directed specifically at level of service and climate change responses, including the $35 million South Dunedin Flood Alleviation project.  Some $20 million has been set aside to make our roads and footpaths safer and more accessible, which is separate to the central city and tertiary precinct upgrades.    

19    The agenda includes detailed reports on the three capital budget options included in the consultation document including the feedback received and staff comments:

·           Bridge / city to waterfront connection

·           Central city upgrade

·           Tertiary precinct project.

20    Because of the large amount of feedback concerning a new Mosgiel Pool, a report on this matter has been provided on the agenda.

21    The Council may want to consider the phasing of capital expenditure investments as well as their quantum, with particular regard to the deliverability of all projects.  In some cases re-phasing may be required for practical reasons, for example the need to align the central city and tertiary precinct upgrades with the construction of a new Dunedin Hospital.

Affordability and funding

22    Some respondents expressed concern about the impacts of proposed rate increases, particularly for older ratepayers on fixed incomes.

23    In developing the draft Financial Strategy, the Council has taken into account rates affordability overall and the draft strategy is underpinned by an assumption that affordability will be maintained, by limiting the rate increase to 8% for the first year of the 10 year plan and an average of 5% per year across years 2 to 10.   The Council intends to keep rates as a percentage of average Dunedin household income at, or below the 5% affordability threshold identified in the 2007 Local Government Rates Enquiry.

24    The proposed rate increases are driven by significant pressure on the costs of delivering core services.  The Council’s previous limit on rates increases of 3% and debt reduction target has not provided the Council with financial headroom or capacity for greater investment or to address unexpected challenges. Rates increases equal to or lower than the local government cost index are not sustainable in the long term without cutting services.

25    Residents on low incomes will continue to be encouraged to access the rates rebate scheme offered by central government as a means of offsetting the cost of rates.

26    The draft financial strategy limits the Council debt to $285 million. This is 110.7% of the 2018/19 revenue budget. The limit is consistent with the maximum debt level forecast in the previous 10 year plan ($255 million in 2015) adjusted for inflation.  To make sure debt remains within the $285 million limit, the Council will focus on strategic investment in Dunedin, and identify and sell properties that are not making an appropriate return or that do not fit with the Council’s overall strategic direction.

27    The draft capital expenditure programme is $864 million over the 10 years of the plan. To deliver this draft programme, the Council will need to borrow an additional $75 million. As well as the $75 million debt funding, the Council would need to use operating cash flow of $726 million and asset sales of $63 million to fund it.  The Council uses debt to fund the cost of intergenerational assets over the life of those assets. Debt funding allows the financial burden of capital expenditure to be spread across a number of years.

Feedback on other matters

28    Many other matters were raised during consultation concerning specific Council activities, including requests for additional funding, and these matters are addressed in separate reports or in the relevant Group reports on this agenda. 

NEXT STEPS

29    During deliberations the Council will be considering the community’s feedback on the draft 10 year plan, options for investing in our city and deciding the final 10 year plan. 

30    As part of the development of the final 10 year plan, some budget updates will need to be made.  These will include any decisions made by Council during the deliberations process, an updated Balance Sheet forecast for the current financial year and budget reorganisations/transfers reflecting structural and reporting line changes within the organisation.   

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Summary of 10 year plan community engagement

29

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the 10 year plan enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The 10 year plan contributes to all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities; the community outcomes; and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The 10 year plan provides a mechanism for Māori to contribute to local decision-making.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the 30 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides an update on the development of the 10 year plan 2018-28.

Financial considerations

The financial implications of the draft budgets are discussed in this report, as well as the Group budget reports and options reports.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

The content of the 10 year plan is of interest to the community and this report provides feedback on the community engagement on the draft budgets and content of the 10 year plan in 2018.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets and options reports.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Refer to the group budget reports and options reports for specific risks considered in the development of the 10 year plan.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the 10 year plan; and Community Boards are involved in the development of the 10 year plan.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Financial Strategy and Financial Policies - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on the draft financial strategy and draft financial policies.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on the draft financial strategy and draft financial policies.

 

community feedback

2      There were 383 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the draft financial strategy and draft financial policies.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Draft financial strategy

3      The draft financial strategy provides a guide for the Council to consider proposals for funding and expenditure against, and provides the overall effects of those proposals on the local authority’s services, rates, debt, and investments.

Rates

4      There were 261 comments received relating to rates. Most of them did not support the proposed rate increases and expressed concern about affordability and the effect on low and fixed income earners. Twelve of the submissions supported the proposed increases. Four submissions mention how the University of Otago is rated.

5      In developing the draft financial strategy, the Council has taken into account rates affordability overall and the draft strategy is underpinned by an assumption that affordability will be maintained.  The draft strategy limits the rate increase to 8% for the first year of the 10 year plan and an average of 5% per annum across years 2 to 10.

6      Residents on low incomes will continue to be encouraged to access the rates rebate scheme offered by central government as a means of offsetting the cost of rates.

7      The proposed rate increases are driven by significant pressure on the costs of delivering core services.  The Council’s previous limit on rates increases of 3% and debt reduction target has not provided the Council with financial headroom or capacity for greater investment or to address unexpected challenges. Rates increases equal to or lower than the local government cost index are not sustainable in the long term without cutting services.

8      Some of the drivers of the proposed average rate increase of 7.3% in the first year of the 10 year plan (2019) include:

·           The need to maintain, replace and renew core, ageing infrastructure

·           The requirement to build new infrastructure to a higher standard

·           The transfer of costs from central government without funding to offset the costs

·           Increased compliance costs

·           Increased costs for property services and maintenance

·           The emerging impacts of climate change on infrastructure and the wider community

·           Increasing expectations from ratepayers.

9      There is also a need to generate a small surplus of cash.  In subsequent years, the rate increases are also driven by declining NZTA subsidies, an uninflated income from Council owned companies, the cost of servicing the increased level of debt, reduced revenue resulting from the anticipated sale of investment property as well as the need to maintain an underlying positive net surplus position.

Debt

10    There were 64 comments received relating to debt.  The majority stated that debt was too high, that the Council should continue to repay debt or were generally not comfortable with the level of debt. A small number of submissions queried the Stadium and other Council owned company debt.

11    To deliver the capital expenditure programme, the Council will need to borrow an additional $75 million. The draft capital expenditure programme is $864 million over the 10 years of the plan. As well as the $75 million debt funding, the Council will use operating cashflow of $726 million and asset sales of $63 million to fund it.  The Council uses debt to fund the cost of intergenerational assets over the life of those assets. Debt funding allows the cost of new projects to be spread across a number of years.

12    The draft financial strategy limits the Council debt to $285 million. This is 110.7% of the 2018/19 revenue budget. The limit is consistent with the maximum debt level forecast in the previous 10 year plan ($255 million in 2015) adjusted for inflation.  To make sure debt remains within the $285 million limit, the Council will focus on strategic investment in Dunedin, and will sell some assets that are not strategic including investment property located outside of Dunedin.

13    The Council reaches the unindexed debt limit in 2028.  Partially offsetting this debt in 2028 is the Waipori Fund investment of $101 million and an advance to Dunedin City Holdings Limited of $112 million.

Asset sales

14    There were 30 comments received relating to asset sales. Around a third of the submissions supported the proposed sales or supported selling properties outside of Dunedin. Another third did not support the proposal to sell property, with some concerned that profit making assets were being sold to fund projects or depreciating assets. Four submissions suggested selling Council owned companies, one did not want Council owned companies to be sold and one did not want the Taieri Gorge Railway to be sold. One submission recommended the sale of Sammy’s.

15    One of the objectives of the 10 year plan is to identify and sell properties that are not making an appropriate return or that do not fit with the Council’s overall strategic direction.  Although the budgets provide for the sale of property assets, a formal decision will be made by the Council on a case by case basis including prevailing market conditions, prior to any actual sales taking place.

Council Controlled Organisations

16    There were 16 comments received relating to Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs). Six related to the Dunedin International Airport Limited. Other submissions raised concerns with Delta, City Forests and debt. Some include suggestions for company sales, retaining services in-house, reconfiguring the company structure and undergrounding power poles.

17    The 10 year plan is for the Council only. However the Council Controlled Organisations are an important component in the Council’s draft financial strategy. While they are valuable assets in terms of their capital value, the income they generate can be used to keep down the levels of funding required from ratepayers.  In more recent years, the revenue expectations from the companies to the Council have been unrealistic. This, coupled with stadium-related debt pressure and the need for group companies to re-invest, has created a degree of financial uncertainty for the Council when trying to adopt budgets and set rates.

18    Group companies are in a rebuilding phase and investing in their own infrastructure - particularly important in the case of lines company Aurora Energy which has infrastructure that needs to be replaced. In addition, Dunedin City Holdings Limited (DCHL), which owns the companies on Council’s behalf, continues the process of building financial headroom so Council receives a steady income stream in the future.  Any volatility in group annual earnings will be absorbed by DCHL so Council can be certain about the money it will receive.

19    The 10 year plan assumes an income stream of $5.9 million per annum from the DCHL group being interest on the current shareholder advance of $112.0 million. Conservatively, no dividend income has been included in the 10 year plan.

Fees and charges – general

20    The Council proposed to increase fees and charges by 4% where possible for the first year of the 10 year plan. There were exceptions to this, for example where the fee increase is driven by cost increases. Community feedback related to specific fees is included in the relevant Group report.

Rating method

21    There were four comments received relating to the rating method. The topics raised include rates on rural land, the option of charging all properties the same amount, the community services rate, the tourism/economic development rate, residential properties used for short term accommodation and utility rates.

Rates and funding advisory panel

22    The Council established the Rates and Funding Advisory Panel to review and provide advice on matters relating to the rating method. During 2017 the Panel considered the six general rate differential categories the Council currently has in place and also changes to these differential categories over time. General rate differential information from several other Councils was provided for comparison.

23    No further changes to the general rate differentials were recommended by the Panel because the status quo was felt to be appropriate. The Panel is continuing to investigate the rateability of residential properties being used for short-term commercial accommodation.

University of Otago

24    Four submissions categorised under ‘rates’ above mention rateability of the University of Otago. Educational establishments, including universities, are categorised by the Local Government Rating Act 2002 as non-rateable. However non-rateable land is liable for certain rates including rates which are set solely for water supply, sewage disposal or refuse collection. More information on the types of property owned by the University of Otago, including how they are currently rated is provided at Attachment A.

Impact of Valuation Changes

25    Concerns have been expressed about the impact of rising property values on rating. The impact of a revaluation depends on whether the property capital value (CV) has changed by more than, or less than, the overall increase or decrease in CV by that property type.  For example, if the CV of a particular property increased by more than the overall increase, then this property would pay more rates. The next revaluation will impact on rates in the 2020/21 year. 

26    There are a number of factors that impact on rates changes for individual properties in addition to any revaluation impacts, for example the level of fixed charges, the overall rate increase and changes in the rating base.

Draft financial policies

27    As part of developing the 10 year plan, the Council reviewed the Council’s revenue and financing policy, development contributions (DCs) policy and rates remission and postponement policies (including for Māori freehold land).   There were two submissions received relating to the revised DCs policy. 

28    The submissions did not support the proposed DCs and raised concerns around the calculation and fairness/equity of the charges and that they would discourage development growth in Dunedin.

Next steps

29    The level of funding determined by the Council and/or changes to the financial strategy and financial policies will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Gavin Logie - Financial Controller

Authoriser:

Dave Tombs - General Manager Finance and Commercial

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Rating examples - University of Otago

44


 

 SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the 10 year plan enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The 10 year plan contributes to all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities; the community outcomes; and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The 10 year plan provides for a mechanism for Māori to contribute to local decision-making.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 Year Plan Deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the 10 year plan generally has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

University of Otago – rating examples

1      Educational establishments, including universities, are categorised by the Local Government Rating Act 2002 as non-rateable. Specifically, the Act categorises as non-rateable, land owned or used by, and for the purposes of ‘an institution under section 159(1) of the Education Act 1989.

2      However non-rateable land is liable for certain rates including rates which are set solely for water supply, sewage disposal or refuse collection.

3      The University of Otago owns and/or uses a large number of properties in the city and has been charged $2.8 million for rates this year.

4      Some examples of the types of property owned by the University of Otago, including how they are currently rated are shown in the table below.  Properties that are ‘non-rateable’ but pay for services are rated as ‘service charges only’ in the rateability column.

Property Category

Property Use

Rateability

Residential Institution

Hall of residence

Service Charges Only

Commercial

Records storage

Service Charges Only

Commercial

Dental School

Service Charges Only

Commercial

Café, privately operated

Fully Rated

Commercial

Used by building contractors

Fully Rated

Commercial

Division of Health Sciences

Service Charges Only

Residential

Private residence

Fully Rated

Commercial

Lecture Theatres and seminar rooms

Service Charges Only

Commercial

Executive Residence

Fully Rated

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Tracking progress on the key principles - Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and Sustainability

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report requests the Council considers adopting indicators to track progress in ensuring the two cross-cutting principles that underpin the city’s strategic framework - Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti), and sustainability - are embedded in the Council's work.

2      The report sets out the work done to develop the approach and indicators, including working with iwi on the indicators for Te Tiriti.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Adopts the proposed indicators and approach in this report, ‘Tracking progress on the key principles – Te Tiriti o Waitangi / Treaty of Waitangi and Sustainability.’

 

BACKGROUND

3      As part of the 10 year plan, the DCC has articulated key community outcomes intended to be achieved through the plan and high-level indicators to track the city’s progress against these.  The DCC is required to report the results of the outcome indicators each year in the Annual Report to show progress towards achieving the outcomes.

4      In this 10 year plan, the DCC committed to aligning these outcomes to the city’s strategic framework.  The high-level or ‘headline’ indicators for these outcomes have been simplified to support the community better in tracking the city’s progress and better embed reporting on strategic objectives.

5      The strategic framework is underpinned by two cross-cutting principles: Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi, and sustainability.  To date there have been no indicators in place for tracking progress on these principles. 

DISCUSSION

Te Tiriti o Waitangi indicators and approach

6      The potential of developing ways to track progress on the two principles was discussed at the Māori Participation Working Party.  It was agreed at this meeting a working group would be established to develop recommended indicators for Te Tiriti comprising of a number of iwi representatives, Aukaha (formerly KTkO) and DCC staff.

7      This working group met on three occasions.  After discussing the range of potential indicators and data availability, the working group agreed the following as its final recommendations:

a)     to look specifically at Māori data across the community outcome indicators be included in the 10 year plan (see Attachment A for indicators and data availability for Māori);

b)     two new indicators to measure progress on the Treaty principle be included in this 10 year plan:

i)      new indicator of Runaka satisfaction with the Māori Participation Working Party and other forms of engagement to be measured through an annual survey;

ii)     new indicator of the percentage of key DCC printed publications (such as the 10 year plan consultation document) that include Māori content and Te Reo translations (as a precursor to measuring mainstreaming of tikanga Māori more generally over time);

c)     the two new indicators be reviewed every three years as part of the 10 year plan process, to ensure they remain appropriate and work is being progressed;

d)     when the indicators included in the eight key strategies are reviewed, consideration will be given to including indicators that support the treaty principles; and,

e)     the number of Māori people invited to participate in the 2018 Quality of Life Survey has been increased, to enable high level results to be produced for Māori people living in Dunedin.

Sustainability indicator and approach

8      Reporting on the community outcome indicators proposed for the 10 year plan will show progress across the broad range of sustainability outcomes; reflecting the economic, social, environmental and cultural dimensions of sustainability.  

9      Staff also recommend that two new overarching indicators of sustainability be included in the 10 year plan, which utilise existing questions in the Residents Opinion Survey (which means a useful time series of data already exists):

i)      percentage of residents agreeing that  ‘Dunedin is a sustainable city’

ii)     percentage of residents agreeing that  ‘The DCC is a leader in encouraging the development of a sustainable city.’

OPTIONS

Option One – Recommended Option: Adopt the proposed indicators and approach

 

10    The Council decides to adopt the proposed indicators and approach to tracking progress on the strategic framework cross-cutting principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi, and sustainability as set out in the discussion section of this report.

Advantages

·           Progress on embedding the two principles into the Council's work is able to be tracked and articulated more easily.

·           Recommendations from the Te Tiriti indicators working group are endorsed.

Disadvantages

·           None identified.

Option Two – Status Quo: No indicators for the two principles are adopted

11    The Council decides not to adopt any indicators for the two principles.

Advantages

·           None identified.

Disadvantages

·           Progress on embedding the two principles into the Council's work is less easily tracked or articulated.

·           Recommendations from the Te Tiriti indicators working group are not taken forward.

NEXT STEPS

12    If the indicators and approach are adopted by the Council reporting on the two principles will be aligned in the Annual Report, commencing 2018/19.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

10 year plan community outcome indicators with key principle lens

50

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This proposal enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The wellbeing of tangata whenua and support for Māori tikanga, and ensuring sustainability, are key themes of the overall strategic framework as well as being strategic principles in themselves. 

Māori Impact Statement

This report follows close engagement with senior representatives of local Runaka and expert advisers.  

Sustainability

This report directly addresses the measurement of outcomes and perceptions around sustainability considerations.   

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report directly concerns outcomes associated with the draft 10 Year Plan and future long term plans. 

Financial considerations

If adopted the indicators will be measured and reported using existing Corporate Policy resources and mechanisms.

Significance

This report is consistent with existing Council strategies and the decision is considered to be low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. 

Engagement – external

There has been close engagement with senior representatives of local Runaka.  

Engagement - internal

There has been internal engagement with Communications and Marketing, and the proposed Te Reo indicator is supported. 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There is a risk of mistranslation of Te Reo, however this will be mitigated by the engagement of a number of identified professional translators.

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Attachment A

 
10 year plan community outcome headline indicators

With Māori and sustainability lens indicated

 

 

Lens

 

Proposed community outcome headline indicators

Māori[1]

Sustainability

Vision

 

Perception that Dunedin is a great place to live

 

Yes

 

No

Social Wellbeing

 

Percentage of residents who have experienced problems with damp or mould in their home during winter

 

Residents’ sense of community within their local neighbourhood

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

3 Waters

 

The water quality of Dunedin’s lakes and rivers using Land Air Water Aotearoa measures

 

Satisfaction with the way the DCC manages the city’s water related infrastructure

 

 

Not applicable

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Spatial Plan

 

Satisfaction with the way the city is developing in terms of its look and feel

 

Urban development capacity

 

Yes

 

Not applicable

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Economic Development

 

Growth in jobs

 

Growth in real GDP per capita

 

Ability to cover costs of everyday needs

 

Yes

 

Not applicable

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

Ara Toi

 

Percentage of residents rating Dunedin as creative

 

Percentage of residents visiting one or more cultural facility within the last twelve months

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

Yes

Integrated Transport

 

Percentage of residents who walk, jog, cycle or take public transport to work

 

Number of fatal and serious injury crashes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Te Ao Tūroa

 

City greenhouse gas emissions

 

Total area of indigenous habitat in Dunedin protected by the District Plan, DCC reserve land and land held under QEII covenants and other statute-based protective mechanisms and/or recognised as Areas of Significant Conservation Value

 

Not applicable

 

Not applicable

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

Parks  and Recreation

 

Percentage of residents who participate in physical activity  5 or more days a week

 

Percentage of residents using a park, reserve and/or open space and/or recreation facility at least once a month

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 

Yes

 

 

Yes

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Partnership with Iwi

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report responds to feedback received through the 10 year plan process from Ngai Tahu as manawhenua, tangata whenua more broadly, and other submissions relating to the DCC’s relationship with Māori.

2      The report sets out work currently underway to work in partnership with manawhenua and tangata whenua, and new activity for the Council to consider.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Partnership with Iwi report.

 

BACKGROUND

3      The DCC recognises its commitments under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and has set them into its strategic framework as a key principle that underpins all activities.

4      Feedback through the 10 year plan engagement process has highlighted potential opportunities for partnership with iwi to drive forward Dunedin’s development.

DISCUSSION

Partnership with Māori

Māori Participation Working Party

5      The Māori Participation Working Party (MPWP) was established in 2003 and a Memorandum of Understanding agreed between the DCC and manawhenua in 2006, which was reviewed in 2009. 

6      A review of the Terms of Reference (ToR) of the MPWP is currently underway and is planned to be finish by October 2018.

7      The review of the MPWP’s ToR includes a review of scope, ambition and membership, including considering elevating from a working party into a more formal partnership arrangement.  Discussion to date relating to the review has examined how the MPWP can enable more strategic, early input into city thinking and projects – particularly in light of the significant development planned within the city. Ngai Tahu Holdings addressed the Council during the 10 year plan hearings regarding their interest in continuing to grow their diversified and long-term investments throughout the South Island and the opportunities they see in Dunedin.

8      Discussion with iwi has also set in motion the development of an action plan to drive forward key activities in the three years of each 10 year plan.  This would enable key focus areas at particular points in time to be addressed.  For example, the current areas that iwi have flagged as critical are pathways for youth and addressing housing needs.

A cultural narrative for Dunedin

9      Relevant to development planned, a cultural narrative for Dunedin has been developed by Aukaha (formerly Kāi Tahu ki Otago Ltd, or KTkO) with Tahu Potiki (currently the DCC’s Kaitakawaenga or cultural advisor), for use by the DCC.  This narrative is designed to inform city decision-making and projects.

10    The cultural narrative was commissioned by the DCC as part of a wider Thematic Heritage Study. Aukaha undertook the research, holding several hui with runaka and interviewing whanau to gather the information. This information was then verified by discussion with the runaka. Tahu Potiki was engaged to pull the information gathered into themes. 

11    The next step with this work is making the narrative fully accessible, both for DCC staff and other stakeholders, and considering how the themes in the narrative can be operationalised.  Discussion to date has focused on the potential for digitizing the information.  This will be taken forward over the next six months.  The narrative will be formally presented to Council.

Ongoing and strategic engagement with all Māori

12    Early engagement with Māori on the development of the 10 year plan – with a hui held at Araiteuru marae in September 2017 – was favourably received by iwi.  Discussion following the hui, including at the MPWP, between staff and iwi has focused on the need for this type of hui to happen on a more regular basis.  The previous hui was held six years ago and it was suggested that hui be timed to ensure strategic and effective input into 10 year planning processes.  The next hui is now planned for February 2020, and they will occur every 3 years in line with 10 year plan processes.

Facilitating partnerships

13    The potential of the DCC establishing a kaumatua for the Council has been discussed.  A number of local authorities and other public sector organisations and institutions such as district health boards and universities have kaumatua.  In Dunedin, the University of Otago, Otago Polytechnic and the Southern District Health Board have established kaumatua.

14    To support the Council and DCC staff in Te Reo and tikanga Māori, the DCC is working with Aukaha and consultants Kiwa Digital to provide key information in a digital format (text and audio) that includes local dialect.  It is intended that this digital content is made publicly available.

15    The DCC now has access to several Te Reo translators familiar with the local dialect which is now included in some key Council documents – for example, it was included in the 10 year plan consultation document.

16    More comprehensive forward planning – the review of the MPWP ToR, the development of an action plan and process for updating it, and the framing of the existing cultural narrative into a useable tool – should support a stronger partnership over time.

Tracking progress

17    As part of the development of the 10 year plan, indicators to track progress on the DCC’s two cross-cutting principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi and sustainability are proposed.  A separate report is provided detailing this work and requesting Council adopt the proposed indicators.

OPTIONS

18    This report is for consideration by the Council and no options are provided.

NEXT STEPS

19    Work underway will continue to be progressed.  Any additional investment in further activating the opportunities submitted on during the 10 year plan process will be taken forward as directed by the Council.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The wellbeing of tangata whenua and support for Māori tikanga, and ensuring sustainability, are key themes of the overall strategic framework as well as being strategic principles in themselves. 

Māori Impact Statement

This report responds directly to the submissions of senior Ngai Tahu representatives in the context of the 10 Year Plan.    

Sustainability

Support for Māori tikanga is consistent with sustainability principles.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report responds directly to the submissions of senior Ngai Tahu representatives in the context of the 10 Year Plan.    

Financial considerations

No new expenditure is proposed in this report.

Significance

This report is consistent with existing Council strategies and the decision is considered to be low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. 

Engagement – external

This report responds directly to the submissions of senior Ngai Tahu representatives in the context of the 10 Year Plan.    

Engagement - internal

The MPWP interacts with a wide cross section of Council activities.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no identified conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no specific implications for Community Boards.

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Carbon assessment of 10 Year Plan proposals 

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      For the first time the Dunedin City Council has procured an initial high-level assessment of the anticipated effects on greenhouse gas emissions arising from capital and operating expenditure proposals in its draft 10 Year Plan.

2      The assessment indicates where particular proposals will potentially reduce or increase the Council’s or Dunedin’s citywide emissions, or where opportunities exist to reduce emissions through future detailed planning of capital and operating expenditure delivery (e.g. Central City Plan). 

3      The emissions assessment was undertaken by AECOM Limited. AECOM noted that a literature review confirmed that this type of carbon assessment is not yet common in New Zealand. 

4      AECOM’s report on the assessment is provided at Attachment A. The report may be of interest to the Council when considering the prioritisation of expenditure in the 10 Year Plan. 

5      AECOM has provided a number of recommendations including options to further improve the carbon assessment process.  These recommendations can be addressed in the next phase of compliance with the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy.  There are also opportunities to increase the emissions reduction potential in the draft 10 year plan, including specific transport capital expenditure project recommendations; and general suggestions for further greenhouse gas emissions reduction initiatives.

6      AECOM’s report will also be disseminated to relevant staff to encourage the consideration of emissions effects in detailed project planning phases of proposals which proceed.  The assessment may also serve as a guide to the type of data required to support future emissions assessments of future proposals. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the report titled ‘Carbon assessment of 10 Year Plan proposals.’ 

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Dunedin 10 year plan 2018-2028 carbon assessment, AECOM Limited

58

 
SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.  This report relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is embedded in a range of Council strategies and through the Council’s participation in the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy. 

 

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

 

Sustainability

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a major aspect of sustainability.

 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This emissions assessment relates to the 10 Year Plan.

 

Financial considerations

There are no immediate financial implications arising from this emissions assessment. 

 

Significance

As an assessment only, the significance of this matter is considered to be low.

 

Engagement – external

As an assessment only, there has been no external engagement.  

 

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff provided data to support the emissions assessment.

 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

 

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest.

 

Community Boards

There are no implications for community boards.

 

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Budget Option - Place-Based Community Grants Scheme

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on options for a new place-based community grants scheme.

2      The options presented in this report are:

·           Council’s preferred option of additional grant funding of up to $200k per year for three years for a new place-based community grants scheme, as included in the draft 10 year plan budget;

·           Additional grant funding of up to $300k per year for three years for a new place-based community grants scheme; and

·           An alternative level of grant funding which may be determined by the Council for a new place-based community grants scheme.

3      The draft 10 year plan budget included $200k for a new place-based community grants scheme for the first three years of the 10 year plan. 

 

1     RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on the options consulted upon regarding the place-based community grants scheme.

b)     Determines the level of funding in the final 10 year plan.

 

 

BACKGROUND

4      The Council considered a report from Community and Planning which provided options for direct funding support for place-based community groups (PBCGs) within Dunedin over the period of the 10 year plan as part of 10 year plan discussions and budgets on 11-13 December 2017, which resulted in the following resolution.

Moved (Cr Aaron Hawkins/Cr Damian Newell):

“That the Council:

a)     Notes the options presented in the report titled ‘Operating Budget Option – Investing in Place Based Community Groups.’

b)     Approves the Council’s preferred option – Option One – Substantial Investment:  Additional grant funding of up to $200k per year for three years for Place Based Community Groups for inclusion in the draft 10 year plan budget.

c)     Includes for the purpose of community engagement in the 10 year plan consultation document both the Council’s preferred option and an option of        Additional grant funding of up to $300,000 per year for three years for   Place Based Community Groups.”

Motion carried (CNL/2017/254) with Cr Vandervis recording his vote against.

5      $200k was included in the draft Community and Planning operating expenditure budget for the first three years of the 10 year plan for a new place-based community grants scheme. Criteria recognising both small and larger groups are under development. 

6      If approved, the Grants Subcommittee would oversee this fund as it does the Community Grants funds, and the fund would be administered by Community Development staff. The existing Community Grant funding of $200k would remain unchanged, as this is a separate fund to the new fund discussed in this report.

DISCUSSION

Community feedback

7      The Council sought specific feedback from the community on the level of investment and funding for the place-based community grants scheme.

8      The Council received 1,157 feedback forms where respondents had indicated their support for the place-based community grants scheme.

Support for place-based community grants scheme

Number of responses

Percentage

Supports $200k per year for a place-based community grants scheme for three years

633

55%

Supports $300k per year for a place-based community grants scheme for three years

524

45%

 

9      Overall there was positive support for the establishment of a Place Based grants scheme with a number of submitters citing the scheme would support current and future community development and strengthen community resilience. Council was commended by a range of submitters for initiation of the grants scheme which would support the delivery of Social Wellbeing Strategy community outcomes.

10    Some submitters commented that the new scheme should also support outcomes under the Council’s Te Au Tūroa and Parks and Recreation Strategy, as well as its Social Wellbeing, Ara Toi and Economic Development strategies.

11    Around a quarter of the formal written submissions made were from Place Based Community Groups (PBCGs) or people working closely with them. Submissions from these groups were mainly in favour of a $300k fund. Three submitters suggested $300k be a minimum, with two recommending $500k. These submitters also noted the need for funding to meet core needs such as salaries and operational costs.

There were comments from submitters (e.g. Chamber of Commerce) that the definition of a Place Based group was unclear and this resulted in some of this organisation’s members being unsure of their support for the fund.  Community Development staff have drafted a criteria for the proposed fund, and have invited Place Based Groups to provide feedback on this. This opportunity has had limited uptake. The draft criteria are due to be presented to the Grants Subcommittee for review in late May, and will answer many of the requests by submitters. 

12    There was a call from the PBCGs for a co-design process to develop ongoing funding.  The PBCG’s also requested that they have representation on any funding committee that would allocate the fund to community groups. Consultation with, and the opportunity for co-design of longer term sustainable funding options will be progressed by Community and Planning. The draft budget provides for the continuation of the place based advisor role, who would progress this work.

13    In relation to community representation on any funding panel, the current Grants Subcommittee which allocates funding includes community representatives and place based groups have the opportunity to nominate representatives each triennium.

14    Submitters also asked for multi-year funding. Council’s current Grants Policy does not allow for this. This is being considered under the wider review of the Policy. 

15    The Greater Green Island Network raised concerns around their eligibility for funding as part of the geographical area covered by them is supported a Community Board. One Community Board raised concerns around the new fund and one submitter suggested the proposed grant should not be supported as groups could be assisted by Community Boards. It is noted that Community Boards do not operate in all areas of the city.

OPTIONS

Option One – $200k per year for three years for a new place-based community grants scheme (currently included in the draft budget)

16    The funding proposed would establish a new place-based community grants scheme specifically for PBCGs capped at $200k per annum for three years.

Advantages

·           Establishment of the fund will provide current Place Based Community Groups (PBCGs) with more financial certainty to be able to meet the DCC’s Community Outcomes in the areas of Social Wellbeing, Arts, Economic Development, Parks and Recreation and Environment.   Currently PBCGs receive around 10% – 12% of the $200K Community Grants pool.

·           Establishment of the fund will allow for monies to be freed up within the Community Grants scheme, which will continue to support interest groups that are not geographically based in communities or neighbourhoods e.g. cultural, social service, disability etc.

Disadvantages

·           The $200K fund may not be sufficient to meet the needs of current or emerging PBCGs.

Option Two – $300k per year for three years for a new place-based community grants scheme

17    The funding proposed would establish a new place-based community grants scheme specifically for PBCGs capped at $300k per annum for three years.

Advantages

·           Establishment of the fund will provide current Place Based Community Groups (PBCGs) with more financial certainty to be able to meet the DCC’s Community Outcomes in the areas of Social Wellbeing, Arts, Economic Development, Parks and Recreation and Environment.   Currently PBCGs receive around 10% – 12% of the $200K Community Grants pool.

·           Establishment of the fund will allow for monies to be freed up within the Community Grants scheme, which will continue to support interest groups that are not geographically based in communities or neighbourhoods e.g. cultural, social service, disability etc.

Disadvantages

·           The higher funding level will result in additional costs to ratepayers.

Option Three – An alternative level of funding for a new place-based community grants scheme

18    Under this option the Council would determine the level of funding (if any) for the new place-based community grants scheme. 

19    Advantages and disadvantages would be dependent on the level of funding allocated.

NEXT STEPS

20    The level of funding determined by the Council for the new place-based community grants scheme will be included in the final 10 year plan.

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision proposal enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The work of place based community groups touch on all aspects of Council delivery and planning.

Māori Impact Statement

There is no specific reference within this report to tangata whenua, but as an interest group they could be impacted by changes in grant funding for groups which are PBCGs. In essence, the Rūnaka themselves could be seen as the largest PBCG within Dunedin.

Sustainability

There may be long term implications for PBCGs and their communities within Dunedin from this decision in terms of sustainability.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

This matter was considered to be of medium significance by the Council in December in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and was included in the consultation document and this report summarises the community feedback on this matter.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the new place-based community grants scheme has been summarised in within this report.

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff and managers from Community and Planning have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback on the place-based community grants scheme.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There is some risk that any increase in funding to PBCGs will have an impact on interest groups and the value Council holds for their work within the community.

Conflict of Interest

There is no known conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Budget Option - Bridge / City to Waterfront Connection

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on options for the construction of a bridge / city to waterfront connection (the bridge).

2      The options presented in this report are:

·           Council’s preferred option of substantial investment in an architectural bridge of $20 million (currently included in the draft budget);

·           Moderate investment in a basic bridge of $10 million; and

·           An alternative level of funding for the bridge.

3      $20 million was included in the draft 10 year plan budget. The Council may determine the level of funding in the final 10 year plan budget.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on the options consulted upon regarding the bridge / city to waterfront connection.

b)     Determines the level of funding in the final 10 year plan.   

 

BACKGROUND

4      The Council considered a report from Community and Planning which presented building and funding options for the construction of a bridge / central city to waterfront connection as part of 10 year plan discussions and budgets on 11-13 December 2017, which resulted in the following resolution.

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Conrad Stedman):

“That the Council:

a)     Notes the options presented in the report titled ‘Capital Budget Option – City to Waterfront Connection’.

b)     Approves for the purposes of community engagement in the 10 year plan consultation document - Option One: Substantial investment: architectural bridge as Council’s preferred option.

c)     Includes both the Architectural Bridge as Council’s preferred option and Option Two: The moderate investment option; basic bridge, underpass or improvements to Jetty Street bridge for the purposes of community engagement in the 10 year plan.”

Division

The Council voted by division.

For:                 Crs David Benson-Pope, Rachel Elder, Christine Garey, Doug Hall, Aaron Hawkins, Marie Laufiso, Mike Lord, Damian Newell, Jim O'Malley, Chris Staynes, Conrad Stedman, Lee Vandervis, Andrew Whiley, Kate Wilson and Mayor Dave Cull(15).

Against:    Nil

The division was declared CARRIED by 15 votes to 0.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/254)

5      The bridge is proposed in response to community feedback received since 2002, seeking improved access to the waterfront and improved public amenity in this part of the central city.

6      The architectural bridge has been designed by Dunedin architects, Architecture Van Brandenburg, and forms part of a wider vision for the revitalising of the waterfront. The bridge is envisaged as a catalyst to kick-starting the revitalisation of the area. 

7      $20 million was included in the draft Transport capital expenditure budget for the bridge connection. It is anticipated that around $5.5 million will be contributed by New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) subject to development of a satisfactory business case. If the proposal is approved, the budget provides for detailed design work and consultation in 2019 with physical work currently programmed to commence in 2020 and take three years.

8      Feedback was also received on the wider vision through the 10 year plan process and is included in the Community and Planning report.

Discussion

Community feedback

9      The Council sought specific feedback from the community on the level of investment and funding for the bridge.

10    The Council received 1,446 feedback forms where respondents had indicated their support for or against investment in the bridge. 

Support for investment in the bridge / city to waterfront connection  (Feedback form)

Number of responses

Percentage

Supports $20 million architectural bridge only

489

34%

Supports $10 million basic bridge only

476

33%

Supports $20 million and $10 million bridge

77

5%

Does not support a bridge

404

28%

 

11    A total of 1,025 postcards were completed during the consultation period which indicated support for or against investment in the bridge. The questions on the postcard mirrored those posed in the 10 Year Plan consultation document. Earlier open-ended feedback on the vision posted at Toitū is not included. 

Support for investment in the bridge / city to waterfront connection  (Postcards)

Number of responses

Percentage

Supports $20 million architectural bridge only

504

49%

Supports $10 million basic bridge only

179

17%

Supports $20 million and $10 million bridge

248

24%

Does not support a bridge

94

9%

 

12    Feedback was sought on which bridge option people preferred via a social media poll on Thursday 22 March 2018.  The poll asked which of two options people preferred in terms of a bridge; an architectural bridge or a basic bridge. The option of ‘no bridge’ was not provided.  Around 1,200 votes were received from those who opted to complete the survey: 64% voted for the ‘architectural ($20m)’; and 36% voted for the ‘basic bridge ($10m).’ Social media polls were more likely to reach people following the relevant DCC social media page, or if the poll was shared in a social media group they are part of, or if one of their ‘friends’ interacted with the poll.

13    There were 328 comments received on the bridge on feedback forms and feedback cards. Public opinion on bridge options proposed in the 10 year plan was mixed.

Support for architectural bridge

14    Many of those who supported the architectural bridge option commented on its vision and potential to stimulate development of the waterfront and encourage growth in tourism, as well as improve accessibility between the city and the harbour.

Support for basic bridge

15    Comments from those supporting a more basic bridge option included this option being more affordable, freeing up funds which could be used elsewhere. Respondents felt that an adequate and functional connection was what required but do not see the need for an architectural bridge.  Other preferred a simpler design to the architectural option, and suggested it was better suited to Dunedin. 

Lack of support for any bridge

16    Those who did not support either  bridge option commented that  there is no need for a bridge, there are other priorities for funding and that it would be a ‘bridge to nowhere’ leading to a waterfront that is cold, windy, unappealing and largely industrial.

Alternative options

17    Many commented on alternative options to those proposed. Some supported investigating other architecturally functional options.  Some supported re-opening the road across the railway. (KiwiRail have consistently advised that this is not an option). Other alternatives ranged from adding a clip-on bridge to the current vehicle bridge and building an underpass. Examples from Auckland, Wellington, New Plymouth and Durham were cited.  Reservations about the design of the architectural bridge were that it could block views and sun.

18    A range of options are being investigated as part of the better business case being developed as part of New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA)’s requirements for funding.

Cost and affordability

19    Cost and affordability were raised by many. Some did not think the city could afford it now while others were concerned about rates increases especially for those on fixed incomes. A number suggested funding should be provided by developers, investors and other key stakeholders.

20    As a noted in paragraph 7 above, the bridge would be jointly funded by DCC and NZTA. Government funding is being sought to enable infrastructure (building platform) around the Steamer Basin, with other elements of the vision intended to be developed by private investors. The waterfront vision comments are included in the Community and Planning Group report.

Other comments

21    There was a range of suggestions about bridge design, including safety, width, gradient, lighting, wheelchair access, parking and sustainable design and materials.  Some were concerned about the timing of the bridge in relation to other developments on the waterfront. Others encouraged Council to think this project through thoroughly using good process and appropriate community engagement.

Provincial Growth Fund

22    The Provincial Growth Fund which is a central government fund for infrastructure is currently available for the next three years. The government has advised there is an expectation that development be completed within that three year period.

OPTIONS

Option One – the Architecture Van Brandenburg bridge of $20 million (included in the draft budget)

23    This option would see the construction of an architectural bridge designed by Architecture Van Brandenburg, to provide the waterfront connection.  The estimated project budget is $20 million, based on Quantity Surveyor estimates of construction costs for the bridge and associated amenities.

Advantages

·           Provides easy, direct and safe access to the waterfront for pedestrians and cyclists, including links with the cycle network, e.g. Peninsula Connection.

·           Creates connections between the Steamer Basin and the Central City, and Warehouse Precinct.

·           Responds to community requests for better access to the waterfront.

·           Provides a potential catalyst for economic revitalisation of Dunedin’s waterfront.

·           Creates a compelling landmark to boost tourism and economic growth.

·           Provides match funding expected in order to secure potential government funding for the enabling infrastructure for the wider vision.

·           Sends clear message to central government that the city is contributing to realising the wider waterfront vision, which is a consideration in accessing funding from the Provincial Growth Fund.

Disadvantages

·           Risk of building a bridge to an area which may not follow through with revitalisation plans.

·           Significant costs associated with the construction and maintenance of the architectural bridge.

Option Two – basic bridge of $10 million

24    This option would see a moderate investment to construct a basic bridge. The estimated project budget is $10 million based on the cost estimates provided by the Opus review.

Advantages

·           Provides easy, direct and safe access to the waterfront for pedestrians and cyclists, including links with the cycle network, e.g. Peninsula Connection.

·           Creates connections between the Steamer Basin and the Central City, and Warehouse Precinct.

·           Responds to community requests for better access to the waterfront.

·           Potentially provides a catalyst for economic revitalisation of Dunedin’s waterfront.

·           Provides match funding required to secure potential government funding for the enabling infrastructure for the wider vision.

·           Lower cost option than the architectural bridge.

·           Potentially lower maintenance and operating costs.

Disadvantages

·           Risk that the government may be less inclined to provide up to $50 million for enabling infrastructure if the local match funding is only $10 million.

·           May not provide the compelling landmark gateway to attract tourists.

·           More limited opportunities for integrating art and creativity in infrastructure.

·           Unlikely to contribute significantly to revitalisation of the waterfront.

Option Three – Council consider a different level of funding to include in the 10 year plan

25    This option would allow Council to allocate a different level of funding or no funding in the 10 year plan for a bridge.

26    Advantages and disadvantages would be dependent on the level of funding allocated.

NEXT STEPS

27    The level of funding determined by the Council for the bridge will be included in the final 10 year plan.  The bridge design will be refined in response to community feedback and results of engineering feasibility work. If the basic bridge is the chosen option, redesign will be undertaken.

28    The Council may want to consider the phasing of the bridge, with particular regard to the deliverability following the consideration of all the capital projects and the current timeframe of the Provincial Growth Fund.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Bridge / city to waterfront connection - 10 year capital budget options

126

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The bridge / city to waterfront connection relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Creating a connection will contribute to a number of Council's strategies.  It will contribute to objectives of providing accessibility, creating safe, well-connected networks, and having a vibrant, exciting city that enables a prosperous economy.  If the structure integrates art and creativity into the design, it will also contribute to creating a vibrant and memorable city with exciting public art.  The Central City Plan lists the connection as a key transformational project.

Māori Impact Statement

Ngāi Tahu has had initial discussions with Architecture Van Brandenburg and some suggested changes have been incorporated into designs to reflect local elements. 

Sustainability

The architectural bridge option is intended to incorporate sustainability design elements. 

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in this report.

Significance

This matter was considered to be of medium- high significance by the Council in December 2017 and was included in the consultation document. This report summarises the community feedback on this matter.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the tertiary precinct project has been summarised in the report. 

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff and managers from Transport and Community and Planning have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback on the bridge

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Potential risks include the construction costs exceeding the QS estimates and other stakeholders not delivering the other elements of the vision within the desired timescale. 

Conflict of Interest

There is no known conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no specific implications for Community Boards. West Harbour and Otago Peninsula Boards have an expressed interest in the wider vision for the waterfront. 

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Budget Option - Central City Upgrade

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on options for upgrading the central city over the period of the 10 year plan.

2      The options presented in this report are:

·           Council’s preferred option of substantial investment across the central city allowing consistently for very high or high quality upgrades of $60 million (currently included in the draft budget);

·           Moderate investment across the central city requiring a mix of high and moderate quality upgrades of $35 million; and

·           Do minimum focused only on renewals.

3      $60 million was included in the draft 10 year plan budget for road, footpath and streetscape renewals and upgrades. Below-ground water infrastructure renewals in the central city are funded in Three Waters budgets. The Council may determine the level of funding in the final 10 year plan budget.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on the options consulted upon regarding the central city upgrade.

b)     Determines the level of funding in the final 10 year plan.

 

 

BACKGROUND

4      The Council considered a report from Community and Planning and Transport which provided options for upgrading the central city over the period of the 10 year plan as part of 10 year plan discussions and budgets on 11-13 December 2017, which resulted in the following resolution.

Moved (Cr Chris Staynes/Cr Kate Wilson):

“That the Council:

a)     Notes the options presented in the report.

b)     Approves the Council’s preferred option – Option One: Substantial investment: $60 million across the central city for inclusion in the draft 10 year plan budget.

c)     Includes for the purpose of community engagement in the 10 year plan consultation document both the Council’s preferred option - Option One: Substantial investment: $60 million across the central city and Option Two: Moderate investment: $35 million across the central city.”

Division

The Council voted by division.

For:                 Crs David Benson-Pope, Rachel Elder, Christine Garey, Doug Hall, Aaron Hawkins, Marie Laufiso, Damian Newell, Jim O'Malley, Chris Staynes, Conrad Stedman, Kate Wilson and Mayor Dave Cull(12).

Against:    Crs Lee Vandervis and Andrew Whiley (2).

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 2.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/254)

5      $60 million was included for the central city upgrade in the draft Transport capital expenditure budget. Project planning is underway and the phasing of the work is reflected in the draft budget. It is expected to take approximately eighteen months to complete the design framework, consultation, concept design, procurement and detailed design before construction on the first package of work can commence.

6      The Council is a member of the Local Advisory Group on the Dunedin Hospital rebuild, which provides recommendations to the Southern Partnership Group, overseeing the redevelopment of hospital services in Dunedin.  The recent announcement of the site for the Dunedin Hospital may impact on the timing of the central city upgrade.

DISCUSSION

Community feedback

7      The Council sought specific feedback from the community on the level of investment and funding for the central city upgrade.

8      The Council received 1,417 feedback forms where respondents had indicated their support for or against investment in the central city.

Support for investment in the central city upgrade

Number of responses

Percentage

Supports $60 million investment only

484

34%

Supports $35 million investment only

601

42%

Supports $60 million and $35 million investment

98

7%

Does not support investment in the central city upgrade

234

17%

 

9      Feedback was sought on which central city upgrade option people preferred via a social media poll on Thursday 29 March 2018.  Around 400 votes were received from those who opted to complete the survey: 70% voted for the ‘substantial upgrade $60m’; and 30% voted for the ‘moderate upgrade $35m’. The option of ‘no upgrade’ was not provided.  Social media polls were more likely to reach people following the relevant DCC social media page, or if the poll was shared in a social media group they are part of, or if one of their ‘friends’ interacted with the poll.

10    Public opinion on the Central City upgrade was split, with a majority of people supportive of the project. Key topics commented on are described below.

The need for the renewal

11    Many submitters supported the project, commenting that the central city was in need of an upgrade. Several submitters had concerns over the cost. It was noted that the Octagon is shabby, with dying trees and broken paving stones. The wider central city area was described as dull, poorly maintained, and car dominated – with associated pedestrian safety and accessibility issues. Many submitters considered that the renewal would bring city growth and vitality, providing modern shopping and comfortable places to live, work and socialise.

12    Several submitters considered that a decent, regular clean-up is all that is needed, rather than a full upgrade. A few submitters considered that the central city is already attractive and people friendly enough, so doesn’t need upgrading. 

Providing for pedestrians

13    Many submitters commented on the need to better provide for pedestrians, by improving accessibility, lowering speed limits, using shared spaces, or excluding motor vehicles (particularly large buses). This was to improve safety, and to allow people to relax and foster a communal feeling. Several people commented that this would also be good for tourism and bring more business into the area.

14    Many considered the Octagon should be pedestrianised, and some considered Lower Stuart, George, and Princes streets should also be pedestrianised. Many positively referenced the closure of the Octagon for the Ed Sheeran concerts.

Art, aesthetics and greenery

15    Several submitters supported art as part of the upgrade project, to help make the central city beautiful, vibrant, and engaging. Doing the “finishing off touches” was considered crucial by some, including seating, shade, and particularly greenery - plantings, trees, and pocket parks for the young and old.

Cost and affordability

16    Some submitters opposed the project because they were concerned about cost and affordability. Some did not think we could afford it now, and should pay off our debts first, while others were concerned about rates increases, especially for those on fixed incomes.

17    A few submitters did not have confidence that Council would be able to effect the necessary changes or spend the money wisely.

Other comments

18    Some submitters commented on the need to improve parking in the central city, including more mobility and drop off/pick up spaces, and removing parking from George Street. These comments will be picked up by the current consultation on parking in the City.

19    Several considered that the upgrade should extend to George Street between Albany and Frederick streets. This was described as an area of special character (near Knox Church, the dental school, and a pedestrian thoroughfare), that also needed safety, accessibility and amenity improvements. Several also noted that the upgrade should extend along Princes Street to the exchange.

20    Some submitters wanted more information, on what works would be done, what area was covered, and what the long term vision for the central city was.

21    A few submitters were concerned at the simplicity of the voting options in the consultation documents, and noted that no “option to not support the project” was given.

OPTIONS

Option One – Substantial investment in the central city upgrade of $60 million (currently included in the draft budget)

22    This option would provide for very high or high quality upgrade applied across the central city. The total estimated cost of this is around $60 million. 

Advantages

·           Fully aligns with the ambitions of the adopted Central City Plan.

·           Vary high or high quality upgrade standards could be consistently applied across the central city, to achieve a very high or high level of transformation.

·           Necessary central city infrastructure renewals projects would be completed.

·           Will encourage private investment in redevelopment.

Disadvantages

·           May not fully align and integrate with the design and timing of the Dunedin Hospital.

·           Higher capital cost and ongoing maintenance costs and depreciation will increase as a result of the higher level of service (estimated at 10% of capital comprising 3% maintenance and 7% depreciation).

Option Two – Moderate investment in the central city of $35 million

23    This option would provide for a mix of high and moderate upgrade standards across the central city. The total estimated cost of this is around $35 million.

Advantages

·           Broadly aligns with the ambitions of the adopted Central City Plan.

·           Upgrades quality would be selected on a project by project basis, to achieve a high or moderate level of transformation at a more moderate cost.

·           Necessary central city infrastructure renewals projects would be completed.

·           Likely to encourage private investment in redevelopment.

·           Lower capital and ongoing maintenance costs.

 

Disadvantages

·           May not fully align and integrate with the design and timing of the Dunedin Hospital.

Option Three – Do minimum focussed only on renewals

24    This option would see the central city upgrade focused on renewals only.  The total estimated capital cost of this option is $8 million, excluding the below ground infrastructure. 

Advantages     

·           Necessary central city infrastructure renewals projects would be completed.

·           Lower capital and ongoing maintenance costs.

Disadvantages

·           Does not align with the ambitions of the Central City Plan.

·           Unlikely to complement other Council and third party projects.

·           The aspirations of many submitters would not be met.

NEXT STEPS

25    The level of funding determined by the Council for the central city upgrade will be included in the final 10 year plan.

26    The Council may want to consider the phasing of the central city upgrade, with particular regard to the deliverability following the consideration of all the capital projects.

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Central city upgrade - 10 year capital budget options

134

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The central city upgrade relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The central city upgrade contributes to multiple objectives across the strategic framework and the ambitions of the Central City Plan.

Māori Impact Statement

Engagement with iwi will occur during design development and implementation. Early engagement has occurred on the development of a cultural narrative prior to detailed design beginning.

Sustainability

The central city upgrade will contribute to improved social, economic and environmental sustainability in the central city.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

This matter was considered to be of medium significance by the Council in December 2017  and was included in the consultation document and this report summarises the community feedback on this matter

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the central city upgrade has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff and managers from Transport and Community and Planning have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback on the central city upgrade.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

With a number of major capital works occurring across the city in the next five years, it will be important to co-ordinate with third parties and maintain communications with businesses and the public to minimise impacts.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for community boards.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

PDF Creator


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Budget Option - Tertiary Precinct

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on options for funding streetscape upgrades within the Tertiary Precinct area.

2      The options presented in this report are:

·           Council’s preferred option of substantial investment in the tertiary area of $20 million (currently included in the draft budget);

·           Moderate investment in the tertiary area of $11.3 million; and

·           Do minimum focused only on renewals.

3      $20 million was included in the draft 10 year plan budget. The Council may determine the level of funding in the final 10 year plan budget.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on the options consulted upon regarding the Tertiary Precinct.

b)     Determines the level of funding in the final 10 year plan.

 

BACKGROUND

4      The Council considered a report from Transport which provided options for funding renewals and/or streetscape upgrades within the Tertiary Precinct area as part of 10 year plan discussions and budgets on 11-13 December 2017, which resulted in the following resolution.

Moved (Cr Kate Wilson/Cr Chris Staynes):

“That the Council:

a)     Notes the options presented in the report titled ‘Capital Budget Option – Tertiary Precinct Upgrade’.

b)     Approves the Council’s preferred option – Substantial investment: $20 million for renewals and streetscape improvements across the Tertiary Precinct area for inclusion in the draft 10 year plan budget.

c)     Includes for the purpose of community engagement in the 10 year plan consultation document both the Council’s preferred option and option 2 – moderate investment $11.3 million.”

Division

The Council voted by division.

For:                 Crs David Benson-Pope, Rachel Elder, Christine Garey, Doug Hall, Aaron Hawkins, Marie Laufiso, Mike Lord, Damian Newell, Jim O'Malley, Chris Staynes, Conrad Stedman, Andrew Whiley, Kate Wilson and Mayor Dave Cull(14).

Against:    Cr Lee Vandervis (1).

The division was declared CARRIED by 14 votes to 1.

Motion carried (CNL/2017/254)

5      $20 million was included in the draft Transport capital expenditure budget for the Tertiary Precinct Upgrade and work is currently programmed to commence in 2020 and take four years.

6      Detailed design work and consultation is scheduled to occur in 2019.  Discussions on the final order of works will be held with the tertiary partners following a decision on funding. The order of works is likely to be heavily influenced by the priorities for service renewals in the area.

DISCUSSION

Community feedback

7      The Council sought specific feedback from the community on the level of investment and funding for the tertiary precinct.

8      The Council received 1,406 feedback forms where respondents had indicated their support for or against investment in the tertiary precinct.

Support for investment in the tertiary precinct

Number of responses

Percentage

Supports $20 million investment only

314

22%

Supports $11.3 million investment only

657

47%

Supports $20 million and $11.3 million investment

58

4%

Does not support investment in the tertiary precinct

377

27%

 

9      Feedback was sought on which tertiary upgrade option people preferred via a social media poll on Wednesday 11 April 2018.  Around 300 votes were received from those who opted to complete the survey: 55% voted for the ‘substantial ($20m)’; and 45% voted for the ‘moderate ($11.3m)’. The option of ‘no upgrade’ was not provided.  Social media polls were more likely to reach people following the relevant DCC social media page, or if the poll was shared in a social media group they are part of, or if one of their ‘friends’ interacted with the poll.

10    Submitters did not agree about whose responsibility it was to fund improvements within the Tertiary Precinct.  Submitters may have been unsure of the scope of the project which is focussed on streetscape improvements and not campus improvements. Many submitters commented that the tertiary institutions were wealthy institutions, received financial assistance or had their own sources of funding.  These submitters generally agreed that the funding improvements should either be left to the tertiary institutions or that it was important the university and polytechnic contributed to the costs of any improvements.  Some comments were made about other community entities also being deserving, or that the city had a number of more urgent and important areas to concentrate investment.

11    Others acknowledged the tertiary institutions were an important sector and an ‘asset’ for Dunedin, and that some investment should be made.  Comments in support of investment noted that the campuses of the tertiary institutions were already attractive and that some investment would complement what had already been spent on the area by the institutions.

12    Many submitters were concerned about the risk of substantial investment in an area where poor student behaviour resulted in public property damage.  Many considered the area was not respected, with broken glass, rubbish and street untidiness, and that investment would be wasted or ongoing repairs and maintenance costs would increase. 

13    Other submitters who expressed concerns about the level of investment also mentioned the appearance and condition of student flats in the area.  They questioned investing in the look and feel of an area poorly maintained by property owners, when other areas of the city would benefit from safety and accessibility upgrades, and look and feel improvements.  Others suggested that improving the quality of the student accommodation was more of a priority than improving the streetscape.

14    Safety and accessibility issues were specifically mentioned in regard to the significant number of pedestrians moving around the area, and risks associated with the main arterial roads that bound the tertiary precinct.  Submitters commented on the importance of improving connections to the central city and new hospital site.

OPTIONS

Option One – Substantial investment in the tertiary area of $20 million (currently included in the draft budget)

15    This would see the tertiary precinct project focused on streetscape amenity improvements across the tertiary area. The estimated project budget is $20 million.

Advantages

·           Would achieve all objectives of the Tertiary Precinct Improvement Project.

·           Service levels would be generally improved across the areas included in the construction programme. The increased service levels would be delivered through amenity upgrades and improvements to footpaths and associated infrastructure.

Disadvantages

·           Higher capital cost and ongoing maintenance costs.

Option Two – Moderate investment in the tertiary area of $11.3 million

16    This option would see the tertiary precinct project focused on improved streetscape amenity on four core streets with renewals across the wider area. The estimated project budget is $11.3 million.

Advantages

·           Would achieve most of the objectives of the Tertiary Precinct Improvement Project.

·           Service levels would be maintained on some streets and improved on the four core streets. The increased service levels would be delivered through amenity upgrades and improvements to footpaths and associated infrastructure.

·           Lower capital and ongoing maintenance costs.

Disadvantages

·           Upgrades would not be of the highest level of service.

Option Three – Do minimum focussed only on renewals

17    This option would see the tertiary precinct project focused only on renewals. The estimated project budget is $4 million.

Advantages

·           Service levels would be maintained and there would be minor improvements made to the tertiary precinct area.

·           Lower capital and ongoing maintenance costs.

Disadvantages

·           Is unlikely to achieve the objectives of the Tertiary Precinct Improvement Project.

Next steps

18    The level of funding determined by the Council for the tertiary precinct project will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

19    The Council may want to consider the phasing of the tertiary precinct project, with particular regard to the deliverability following the consideration of all the capital projects.

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Tertiary precinct - 10 year capital budget options

141

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The tertiary precinct project relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The tertiary improvement project contributes to multiple objectives across the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

Engagement with iwi will occur during the design process.

Sustainability

This project will contribute to improved social and environmental sustainability in the tertiary precinct project.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

This matter was considered to be of medium significance by the Council in December 2017 and was included in the consultation document and this report summarises the community feedback on this matter.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the tertiary precinct project has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff and managers from Transport and Community and Planning have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback on the tertiary precinct project.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The tertiary precinct project does not occur within a community board area.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Budget Option - Mosgiel Pool

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on Council financial contribution to the proposed new swimming pool in Mosgiel (Mosgiel Pool).

2      The Council is working with the Taieri Community Facilities Trust to establish the size, specifications and associated capital and operational costs of Mosgiel Pool. This work includes establishing the potential financial contributions to the project of both The Trust and Council.

3      The options presented in this report are:

·           The Council provides the financial contribution to Mosgiel Pool as included in the draft 10 year plan;

·           The Council considers a greater level of financial contribution to Mosgiel Pool; and

·           An alternative level of funding for Mosgiel Pool.

4      $6.4 million was included in the draft 10 year plan budget as the Council’s contribution to Mosgiel Pool.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on the Mosgiel Pool.

b)     Determines the level of funding in the final 10 year plan.

 

 

BACKGROUND

5      After considering Long Term Plan (LTP) submissions in May 2015, the Council resolved:

a)     That the Council agrees to:

(i)    Support in principle the development of a new aquatic facility for Dunedin in Mosgiel.

(ii)   Fund up to $300,000 from the 2015 underspend to progress:

a.     geotechnical investigations and designation of a site

b.     development of design and capital and operating budgets

c.     liaison and communication of progress.

(iii)   Approve an interest free loan of $50,000 to the Trust for operational costs to be repaid from early fundraising once the Council confirms a decision to proceed.

(iv)   Acknowledge the substantial progress the Trust has made in developing the proposal and thank them for their contribution completing the first part of the proposal.

(v)   Request that staff and the Trust work on the development of a new MoU to be presented to the Community and Environment Committee at a later date for ratification.

b)     That Council includes in the LTP a placeholder of $6 million in 2018-19 for new aquatic facilities in Mosgiel, noting that staff would:

(i)    Work closely with the Trust.

(ii)   Report back concept design options and costs by 30 October 2015.

(iii)   Report back developed design options and costs by 30 April 2016.

(c)    That Council confirms that the capital expenditure on new aquatic facilities in Mosgiel is subject to the Trust achieving a fundraising target of $7.5 million and final Council approval of the project.

6      Since the 2015 meeting, the Council has continued to work with the Taieri Community Facilities Trust (the Trust) to establish the pool’s size, location, specification and associated capital and operational costs. This work includes establishing the Council’s and Trust’s potential financial contributions towards the project. 

7      $6.4 million was included in the draft 10-year plan budget for Mosgiel Pool in the draft Reserves and Recreational Facilities capital expenditure budget. ($6.4 million for the DCC contribution). Information on the proposed funding for the Mosgiel Pool was included in the consultation document.

DISCUSSION

8      There were 427 comments received on Mosgiel Pool on feedback forms and feedback cards.

9      The majority of the comments received requested that the Council provide a greater level of financial contribution to Mosgiel Pool than the $6.4 million allocated in the draft 10 year plan.

10    The reasons for the requests for a greater level of funding from the Council included the following views:

·           There is a need for the existing pool facilities to be upgraded to accommodate the growing Mosgiel population;

·           The Council has an obligation to replace the existing pool and its facilities, which are past the end of their asset life;

·           $6.4 million is an insufficient level of investment for the Council to replace the existing pool facilities;

·           The community’s role is to raise funds for enhancements and upgrades to the current pool facilities, including facilities for young families and the older person.

 

 

 

Design options and build costs for Mosgiel Pool

11    The Council is currently working with the Trust to establish the Mosgiel Pool’s size, specifications, associated capital and operational costs.

12    Two design options for the Mosgiel Pool have been developed to date. A modest upgrade of the existing Mosgiel Pool facilities, including a 25m x 6 lane pool and a toddler pool has been costed at $8.3 million.

13    A substantial upgrade of the existing Mosgiel Pool facilities that provides additional facilities over and above those currently provided, including a 25m x 8 lane pool, a dedicated learn to swim pool, a leisure space and spa, and a hydrotherapy pool  has been costed at $11.5 million.

Additional associated project costs

14    The costs above are for the design and construction of the pool facility only.

15    Council staff have undertaken an initial exercise to cost additional associated project costs and it is estimated that these would total $2.5 million. This cost would apply to both the modest upgrade and the substantial upgrade design options. They include costs relating to:

·      The decommissioning of the existing pool;

·      Demolition of the existing building and site clearance;

·      Earthworks and connections to existing city network utilities infrastructure; including water connection;

·      All works outside the building footprint such as car parking, pathways, planting, and lighting in Memorial Park;

·      Upgrade to road infrastructure and associated intersections/entrances;

·      Changes to sportsfield configuration and lights;

·      Relocation of Mosgiel Camping Ground and associated remedial work to the site;

·      Costs associated with statutory consents and approvals for the pool;

·      Design fees and costs associated with statutory consents and approvals for these exclusions;

·      An allowance for a 10% contingency, appropriate to the size and complexity of the project.

Operational expenditure

16    The associated increase in operational costs resulting from the improved level of service at Mosgiel Pool is included in the draft 10 year plan. It is anticipated that the increased income from the pool will offset these operational costs.

Option One – Council provides a financial contribution to Mosgiel Pool as included in the draft 10 year plan

17    This option would see the Council contribute $6.4 million to the Mosgiel Pool redevelopment.

Advantages

·           Reflects the Council’s financial contribution to the new Mosgiel Pool as included in the draft 10 year plan.

Disadvantages

·           This option doesn’t reflect the 10 year plan community feedback received on Mosgiel Pool;

·           The Council is dependent on the Trust’s financial contribution and willingness to fundraise, in order to provide a modest upgrade to the existing Mosgiel Pool facility i.e. 25m x 6 lane pool and toddler pool;

·           This option will not provide the additional water spaces, expected by the community and the Trust, including a 25m x 8 lane pool, a dedicated learn to swim pool, a leisure space and spa, and a hydrotherapy pool;

·           There is no budget allowance to deliver the additional associated project costs, including demolition of existing building, associated work to Memorial Park and surrounds and costs associated with the removal of the Mosgiel Camping Ground.

Option Two – Council provides a greater level of financial contribution to Mosgiel Pool

18    This option would see the Council contribute $10.8 million to the Mosgiel Pool redevelopment (modest upgrade of $8.3 million plus the additional associated project costs of $2.5 million).

Advantages

·           This option reflects the 10 year plan community feedback received on the Mosgiel Pool for the Council to provide a greater level of funding to the new Mosgiel Pool;

·           It allows sufficient budget for the Council to provide a modest upgrade to the existing Mosgiel Pool facility i.e. 25m x 6 lane pool and toddler pool and to deliver the additional associated project costs, including demolition of existing building, associated work to Memorial Park and surrounds and costs associated with the removal of the Mosgiel Camping Ground;

·           This option enables the Trust’s financial contribution to the project to provide the additional water spaces, expected by the community, including a 25m x 8 lane pool, a dedicated learn to swim pool, a leisure space and spa, and a hydrotherapy pool.

Disadvantages

·           This option does not reflect the Council’s financial contribution to the new Mosgiel Pool as included in the draft 10 year plan.

Option Three – Council consider a different level of funding

19    This option would allow Council to allocate a different level of funding or no funding in the 10 year plan for the Mosgiel Pool.

20    Advantages and disadvantages would be dependent on the level of funding allocated.

NEXT STEPS

21    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Mosgiel Pool will be included in the final 10 year plan.

22    The Council will continue to liaise with The Trust to understand the timeline and phasing of the project as it develops.

23    The Council may want to consider the phasing of the Mosgiel Pool, with particular regard to the deliverability following the consideration of all the capital projects.

 

Signatories

Author:

Robert West - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Mosgiel Pool - Draft 10 year plan capital expenditure profile

148

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The Mosgiel Pool relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The provision of a new aquatic facility in Mosgiel is relevant to a number of Council's strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Engagement with iwi will occur during design development and implementation.

Sustainability

The development of new community infrastructure in Mosgiel supports social sustainability and sustainability principles will be considered in the developed design and operation of the facility.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The matter is considered to be of medium significance. 

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Mosgiel Pool has been summarised in the report. Partnership with the Taieri Community Facilities Trust is ongoing.

Engagement - internal

Relevant staff and managers from Parks and Recreation; and Community and Planning have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback on the Mosgiel Pool.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no risks associated with this decision.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

This project is within the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board area.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

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Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

3 Waters - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: 3 Waters

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the 3 Waters Group, which includes the following activities.

·           Water supply

·           Sewerage and sewage (wastewater)

·           Stormwater.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the 3 Waters Group.

 

community feedback

2      There were 149 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the 3 Waters Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Storm water improvements

3      There were 80 comments relating to storm water improvements.  There is $77.3 million included in the draft capital budget for storm water improvements and renewals, including $35 million for the South Dunedin flood alleviation project.

4      The submissions supported spending on stormwater improvements in South Dunedin and Mosgiel, some noted regular consultation is essential and a few noted the lack of investment to date and the limited action since June 2015 flooding.

5      A number of submissions noted the improvement of clearing mudtanks and sweeping street gutters and thanked the DCC. Staff will continue to investigate sustainable drainage systems and the use of permeable green spaces; review stormwater networks as a whole including overland flows between catchments; and work closely with Transport to address localized stormwater flooding issues. In parallel, staff are also working with consultants to plan mitigating options of stormwater flooding and meet the correct level of service standard.

6      Staff will follow up on operational matters with relevant submitters around particular areas of concern with flooding and storm water issues (eg. Surrey Street).

Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plant

7      There were 26 comments relating to the Green Island Wastewater Treatment Plan (GIWWTP).  There is $44 million included in the draft capex budget for the GIWWTP upgrade, including $2 million of renewals in 2022.

8      There was borad support for the GIWWTP upgrade and some requests for something to be done in the short term to help Surrey Street area. One submitter requested spending to improve Mosgiel Wastewater Treatment Plant.

3 waters – improvements

9      There were 26 comments relating to improvements in 3 Waters.

10    Generally most points raised in the submissions are included in the draft 10 year plan. Overall there was support on spending to improve stormwater infrastructure and to focus spend on basic services (e.g. 3 Waters) over other services. There was some emphasis on the need to improve 3 Waters services urgently.

11    Waikouaiti Coast Community Board and some residents mention dissatisfaction with the lower level of service for 3 Waters in their area compared to urban Dunedin and there was some mention of eventual need for a sewerage system for Waitati.

3 waters - operational

12    There were 11 comments relating to operational 3 Waters matters. 

13    Generally everything raised in the submissions is included in the draft 10 year plan. Staff will follow up with the relevant submitters through the usual procedures.

14    One submission referred to reinstating UV treatment at Mt Grand and Southern Water Treatment Plants. This decision was made to save costs and balanced against the New Zealand Drinking Water Standards 2008 and found to be a safe approach. Drinking water standards will likely be reviewed soon, a review of UV treatment at those named plants can be made with a recommendation to Council.

15    One submission mentioned a substandard water supply in Waitati. Waitati is a small rural community and is serviced by restricted water supply. The community is remote and low density when compared with most of the Dunedin urban area. To service rural communities, a longer length of pipe per property is required with results in a greater cost per property. A restricted supply means that pipe diameters can be reduced, which reduces the infrastructure cost per property to a figure more aligned with the city. There is currently no plan to review Dunedin’s restricted schemes. Installing adequate private plumbing helps to ensure that a customer experience is similar to urban properties.

Drinking water safety

16    There were five comments relating to drinking water safety.

17    Submissions generally support supplying quality drinking water. Several submissions reference no longer fluoridating drinking water. Fluoride is added to the water to reduce tooth decay. The decision to add fluoride to the water is based on recommendations from the Ministry of Health. The Health (Fluoridation of Drinking Water) Amendment Bill proposes to enable District Health Boards to make decisions and give directions about the fluoridation of local government drinking water supplies in their areas. No changes are planned to Dunedin’s existing fluoridation arrangements until the Bill has progressed through the full parliamentary process and is either passed into law or fails.

Coastal erosion

18    One submission raised specific concerns around coastal erosion at St Clair and St Kilda. Funding is allocated in year one of the draft 10 year plan to develop a plan to manage the St Clair/St Kilda frontage.

Next steps

19    The level of funding determined by the Council for the 3 Waters Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Tom Dyer - Group Manager 3 Waters

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the 3 Waters Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

The draft budgets provide for ongoing improvements to water quality and water management.  There is iwi engagement on a case-by-case basis as projects are developed and implemented.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the 3 Waters budgets will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the 3 Waters Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Roading and Footpaths - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Roading and Footpaths Group.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Roading and Footpaths Group.

 

Community feedback

2      There were 635 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Roading and Footpaths Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Cycleways

3      There were 204 comments relating to cycleways.  There is $23 million included in the draft capital budget for the Dunedin Urban Cycleways programme.

4      Submitters were mixed in their support for cycleways. Key concerns related to cost and cycle numbers. Many submissions commented that improved cycle safety should not compromise the safety of pedestrians. The network will be planned and developed using increasingly available national guidance provided by NZTA and international best practise. This guidance has regard to the range of cyclist abilities and bicycle capacity, including the increasing use of electric bikes.

5      Submitters made positive comments on the development of the harbour circuit, and asked that future network development extend to the city’s outer suburbs, including the tunnels. Transport will continue to work with the Tunnels Trust as they progress the re-opening of the Chain Hills Tunnel and Caversham Tunnel, as well as working with Otago Central Rail Trail Trust and Clutha Gold Trail Trust.

6      The Council also continues to work with NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) in its development of the SH88 shared path. Comments relating to the SH88 shared path (St Leonards to Port Chalmers) and comments relating to the SH1 one-way pair cycle lanes will be referred to NZTA.

Transport improvements and safety

7      There were 152 comments relating to transport improvements.  For the purposes of reporting, this category includes general transport improvements (116); and safety improvements (36). There is $161 million for transport renewals across the ten years in the draft capital budget. There is also $2 million included each year for investment in minor improvements, including safety improvements.

8      Some submissions raised concerns around some footpaths in Dunedin. The draft 10 year plan includes $27 million for footpaths renewals to ensure they are maintained in satisfactory condition.

9      Some submissions raised concerns around traffic congestion. Certain areas of Dunedin experience short term periods of congestion at particular times during the day. Overall staff are broadly satisfied that the existing Transport network is able to cope with current and future demand.

10    Maintenance budgets are considered appropriate to maintain the level of service across transport assets.

Public transport

11    There were 81 comments relating to public transport. There is no specific funding included in the draft budgets for public transport as the Council is not responsible for the delivery of public transport in Dunedin.

12    DCC staff work with Otago Regional Council (ORC) on the provision of bus stops on the road network to ensure they are in safe and appropriate locations. All other Public Transport related matters are the responsibility of ORC and submissions will be referred to them.

Transport - operational

13    There were 67 comments relating to operational transport matters. 

14    Submissions raised a number of maintenance issues and suggestions, such as particular intersection concerns, pedestrian safety, seawalls, preventative maintenance to deal with storm surge, and sycamore trees. All of the matters raised will be reviewed by staff and prioritised for action as appropriate.

LED lights and streetlights

15    There were 65 comments relating to LED lights and streetlights. There is $12 million included in the draft capital budget for the LED streetlights project.

16    Public opinion was heavily in favour of the renewal of streetlights. Some expressed concern about the possible adverse effects of LEDs, particularly the higher kelvin luminaires with high proportions of blue light. Effects referred to included night sky, amenity, glare and health effects. Amber LED lights were requested by some submitters to address night sky impacts.

17    Transport has planned this renewal carefully to ensure the project delivers on its wider aims, and takes up the opportunities that LED technology offers. Roll out of the luminaires is anticipated to begin at the end of 2018 or the start of 2019. Any delay to the project would delay a realisation in the maintenance and energy cost savings from installing LEDs.  Transport will report to the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee (ISNCOM) as planning progresses and will seek final approval from ISNCOM prior to the roll out of the LED streetlights project.

Peninsula connection

18    There were 44 comments relating to Peninsula connection. There is $44 million included in the draft capital budget for the Peninsula connection.

19    Submissions generally supported the delivery of the Peninsula connection project. Project funding is included in the draft 10 year plan and funding has been secured from NZTA. A contract for the section from Turnbulls Bay to Portobello has been awarded and work has started.  Further sections will be awarded subject to funding being committed during this 10 year plan.

Major centre upgrades

20    There were 22 comments relating to major centre upgrades. There is $8.5 million included in the draft capital budget for the major centre upgrades.

21    Submissions supported investment in Dunedin’s major centres and in destinations that people visit, including Green Island, Mosgiel, Port Chalmers, St Clair, Portobello and South Dunedin. Staff respond to individual requests for safety, accessibility and amenity upgrades within Dunedin’s commercial centres. Whenever possible, staff take a planned, coordinated approach to these requests to make best use of operational budgets, including working with NZTA when upgrade requests relate to the State Highway network.

Next steps

22    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Roading and Footpaths Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

23    The Council may want to consider the phasing of the Transport projects, with particular regard to the deliverability following the consideration of all the capital projects.

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Roading and Footpaths Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the Roading and Footpaths budgets will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Roading and Footpaths Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Reserves and Recreational Facilities - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group, and includes the following activities.

·           Aquatic Services

·           Dunedin Botanic Garden

·           Cemeteries and Crematorium (Cemeteries)

·           Parks and Reserves (Parks).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the funding requests from the Dunedin Wildlife Hospital, Mountain Bike Otago, West Harbour Community Board, Corstorphine Community Hub, Friends of the Botanic Garden and Predator Free Dunedin.

b)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group.

 

Funding requests

2      The following requests for funding were received from organisations, and are currently not included in the draft budgets. As a guide, an addition of $138k of operating expenditure would add approximately 0.1% to the 7.3% average rate increase proposed in the first year of the draft 10 year plan.

Summary of request

Amount sought in 2018/19

Dunedin Wildlife Hospital (643785): Request support for the Wildlife Hospital Dunedin for staff salary and consumables with two funding options.

 

Option 1: base level investment (salary only).

$57k

Option 2: salary and consumables.

$77k

Mountain Bike Otago (645395): Mountain bike facilities - Want financial assistance for Signal Hill developments.

 

Providing a toilet and drinking water at carpark.

$100k to $150k

DCC assist in the development of new tracks on Signal Hill Reserve - Many councils around NZ now commit an annual amount to the development of mountain biking trails.

$20k to $40k

DCC assist in the development of public dirt jumps.

Not specified.

West Harbour Community Board (644324): Port Chalmers Streetscape - would like council to set aside appropriate funding for a significant upgrade of the streetscape / urban outlook of the historical centre (George Street) in Port Chalmers. Funding in the 2019/20 or 2020/21 financial year with a smaller amount available earlier for investigation and planning.

Not specified.

Harbour cycleway/public toilet - Seeking provision of a toilet near cycleway at St Leonards in 19/20 or 20/21 budgets.

 Not specified.

Continuation of sycamore removal programme.

$40k

Corstorphine Community Hub (644938): Requests support for a community garden. They have been able to secure another area but require support to help establish it.  Requests the Council to consider not charging rents for use of reserves.

Not specified.

 

Friends of the Botanic Garden (646908): Botanic Garden teaching resources - No teaching programme since 2008. Seeking funding for full time curriculum based teacher.

$120k

Predator Free Dunedin (650550): Seek one-off funding of $250k in 2018/19 for projects to achieve predator free status over 30,000 hectares in and around Dunedin.  This contribution is intended to assist in leveraging the maximum funding from the Government’s Predator Free 2050 initiative.

$250k

Seeking additional funding of $120k per annum for five years for funding personnel, operational equipment and hardware.

$120k

community feedback

3      There were 271 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Parks and recreation improvements

4      There were 97 comments relating to parks and recreation improvements. For the purposes of reporting, this category includes general parks and recreation improvements (57); playgrounds (17); tracks and trails (12); and sportsfields and facilities (11). There is $36.6 million included in the draft capital budget for parks and recreation improvements and renewals.

5      A wide variety of submissions requesting improved maintenance of existing facilities and new innovative facilities. Improved management and prioritisation of current assets is a priority work project for Parks and Recreation services in 2018/19. Improvement suggestions align well with Council's Parks and Recreation Strategy objectives, goals, and priorities, and will be considered as part of the implementation of the strategy.

6      There was specific support for investment in playgrounds, including upgrades to existing playgrounds and new playgrounds in Dunedin. There is $6.7 million included in the draft capital budget for renewing playground assets.

7      There were specific support for the development and maintenance of tracks and trails around Dunedin.  There is $500k included in the draft capital budget for upgrading track assets to ensure the network is safe and accessible.

Wildlife Hospital Dunedin

8      There were 40 comments relating to the Wildlife Hospital Dunedin.  There is no specific funding included in the draft budgets for this project.

9      The submissions support the Wildlife Hospital, and refer to the benefits from the initiative including: the educational and employment opportunities; links to the Wildlife Capital of New Zealand; and safeguarding the endangered species to future-proof the local economy through ecotourism.

10    The Dunedin Botanic Garden has offered an empty aviary for rehabilitating small native bush birds and this should not impose any extra costs to the Council, as it would be funded by supporters of the Hospital.

Parks and recreation – operational

11    There were 36 comments relating to operational parks and recreation matters.  For the purposes of reporting, this category includes general parks and recreational operational requests (20); parks and reserves (10); grants and support (5); and community gardens (1).

12    Submissions generally supported investment in maintenance of parks and reserves infrastructure. There was a wide variety of submissions requesting improved maintenance of current facilities, and an increase in facilities. Suggestions will be considered as part of Parks and Recreation capital and renewals programme of work.

13    Parks and Recreation Services will follow up on operational matters with relevant submitters around particular areas of concern (eg. community gardens, use of Tahuna Park for car shows).

Aquatic facilities

14    There were 22 comments relating to aquatic facilities. There is $23 million included in the draft capital budget for aquatic services improvements and renewals, including $7.7 million for Mosgiel Pool ($6.4 million for the DCC contribution and $1.3 million for renewals).

15    Several submissions requested consideration be given to extend community pool season. Community pool seasons have been extended in recent years due to community requests, and Aquatic services will continue to review and look at opportunities. Several submissions supported aquatic service improvements and renewals.

Public toilets

16    There were 20 comments relating to public toilets. 

17    Submissions requested increasing public toilet facilities across the city. Parks and Recreation Services will undertake a review of public toilet services during 2018/19.

Biodiversity

18    There were 20 comments relating to biodiversity.

19    Submissions were concerned about the biodiversity in Dunedin and requested that the Council consider more investment to support a variety of biodiversity projects.

Freedom camping

20    There were 17 comments relating to freedom camping.

21    Submitters were split in their views of freedom camping, but there was general consensus that there was inadequate infrastructure across the city to support freedom camping, and concerns that the bylaw was not being enforced. A review of the last season will occur in July 2018 and options for improving the management of freedom camping for the 2018-2019 season will be considered.

Pest control / predator free

22    There were ten comments relating to predator free and pest control.

23    All submissions were supportive and appreciative of Council's active participation and partnership with pest control initiatives and supportive of joint work with local pest control and predator free organisations. 

24    One submitter queried why the Council ceased undertaking scientific evaluation and research into the effectiveness of the weed and pest control in the Town Belt. Parks and Recreation Services will review the research initiative in the 2018/19 year.

Logan Park

25    There were nine comments relating to Logan Park.  There is no specific funding for Logan Park in the draft capital budget. There is a broader review of the wider parks network including Logan Park and a report will be provided to the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee.

Next steps

26    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Robert West - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Property - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Property

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Property Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Commercial property

·           Community housing

·           Operational property.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Property Group.

 

community feedback

2      There were 48 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Property Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Community housing

3      There were 23 comments received relating to community/social housing.  There is $6.5 million included in the draft capital budget for Housing renewals.

4      Submissions requested more social housing in Dunedin and improvements to the current social housing stock.

5      A Mayoral Task Force has been established on housing to address the need for emergency, social and affordable housing. Subject to the outcome of the Mayoral Taskforce on Housing, a strategic plan will be developed to ensure community/social housing is appropriate. A trial on two units is currently underway to test the most cost effective/capital options for improving safety, energy efficiency, and reduce to tenant power consumption.

Community housing rents

6      There were nine comments received relating to rents for community housing.  The draft 10 year plan proposed increasing the rent for all types of community housing units by $9 per week. The rent for units had not been increased for four years.

7      Submissions that did not support the increase in rent were concerned about the affordability for the tenants. Some submissions supported the increase and one submission suggested that smaller annual increases would be preferable to a nine dollar increase in one year.

8      The Council’s funding policy currently requires fees and charges for the Housing activity to be set to break even and there has been no increase in rent for the past four years.

Property – improvements

9      There were nine comments received relating to property improvements. There is $46 million included in the draft capital budget for commercial and operational renewals.

10    Property are working with Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority to improve the energy efficiency of the operational property and are investigating developing some properties (e.g Sammy's and Edgar Centre). The suggestions will be considered as part of Property’s capital and renewals programme of work. 

Property - operational

11    There were seven comments received relating to operational property matters.  Most of these are operational matters and will be considered as part of Property’s capital and renewals programme of work.

Next steps

12    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Property Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Property Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Property Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Libraries and Museums - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Libraries and Museums Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Dunedin Public Art Gallery (DPAG)

·           Dunedin Public Libraries (Libraries)

·           Olveston

·           Toitū Otago Settlers Museum (Toitū)

·           Dunedin Chinese Garden.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the funding requests from the Otago Museum, Mayfair Theatre Charitable Trust and Gasworks Museum.

b)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Libraries and Museums Group

 

Funding requests

2      The following requests for funding were received from organisations, and are currently not included in the draft budgets.  As a guide, an addition of $138k of operating expenditure would add approximately 0.1% to the 7.3% average rate increase proposed in the first year of the draft 10 year plan.

Summary of request

Amount sought 2018/19

Otago Museum (644809): Museum has $16.6 million development programme planned over the next 10 years. Contribution to capital development programme of $1.9 million over 10 years sought (to match amount allocated to Toitū).

Unclear.

Mayfair Theatre Charitable Trust (645154): Assistance to remediate issues with building especially the roof. The roof needs to be replaced and is asbestos. Other aspects that need attention are disabled access, more toilets, seismic strengthening (the building requires only a little work to bring it up to 85% of code) fire protection, but does require some other work to improve back of stage facilities.

$200k minimum

Gasworks Museum (649616): Completion of seismic strengthening and restoration of the buildings; ongoing maintenance, including an allocation for ongoing operating costs; and advice and assistance from Toitū.

Not specified.

community feedback

3      There were 142 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Libraries and Museums Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

South Dunedin community hub

4      There were 52 comments relating to the South Dunedin community hub.  There is $5.25 million included in the draft Property capital budget in 2020 and 2021 for the South Dunedin community hub.

5      Submissions were mixed in supporting the establishment of a permanent library in South Dunedin.  Most of the submissions were in favour of the development of the permanent South Dunedin community hub. Some suggestions for the location included the Gasworks Museum, South City Mall and some suggested splitting the hub across two locations.

6      Reasons for not supporting the hub development included that it was not needed, that the cost is too high, and concerns around the water table in the area.

Sammy’s

7      There were 24 comments relating to Sammy’s. There is $5 million included in the draft Property capital budget in year 3 of the 10 year plan (2021).

8      Most of the submissions opposed the investment in Sammy’s. A submission has been received from the Fortune Theatre Trust proposing the development of Sammy’s into a community centre for the performing arts. The submission suggested that the new facility should have flexible performance spaces with associated catering and retail spaces providing opportunities for earning income to support the centre’s cultural programme. The Fortune Theatre Trust is proposing a role for itself in helping to plan, develop and programme the developed facility.

9      Discussions are underway with Creative New Zealand about funding a feasibility study considering the options for the future of performing arts in Dunedin. This is likely to include consideration of the suitability or otherwise of Sammy’s to be used as a performing arts hub. The proposed capex budget of $5 million for redevelopment of Sammy’s is a placeholder which will require confirmation through feasibility and business case process.

10    Staff have regular connections with performing arts venues and organisations in the city and a strategic piece of work to map the current performing arts environment is planned for 2018/19. This work will look at how the needs of arts organisations and facilities are best met whilst balancing newer demands on the same funding pools.

11    Staff will report to the Council on the next steps for Sammy’s once the performing arts infrastructure review has been undertaken. Council may want to consider bringing the capital allocation forward to year 2 of the 10 year plan (2020) to enable any potential actions on the needs identified from the review. 

Bookbus

12    There were 17 comments relating to the book bus or mobile library services.  There is $600k included in the draft Governance and Support Services capital budget for the Bookbus replacement in the first year of the 10 year plan (2019). 

13    Submissions supported the replacement of the current Bookbus vehicles and the value of the service particularly the elderly and young children. Some submissions advocated the expansion of the Bookbus service.

14    In terms of the vehicle replacement options, staff are investigating the availability of suitable electric vehicles, and potential EECA funding support, to provide a more efficient and sustainable longer term mobile library service.

Libraries

15    There were 17 comments relating to libraries. 

16    Submissions requested increased opening hours at the City and Mosgiel libraries, particularly on weekends. The draft 10 year plan does not currently include provision for resourcing these increased opening hours.

17    Submissions also supported an upgrade to the City Library and increased funding for libraries. Some submitters expressed concern at the withdrawal of older, less used book collections.

Public art

18    There were 17 comments relating to public art.  There is $200k included in the draft capital budget for art installations in public places.  The Art and Creativity in Infrastructure Policy also requires that original artwork or creativity components are considered and integrated within above ground infrastructure projects

19    Submissions generally supported public art in Dunedin.  The Public Art Framework is currently being rolled out. The first phase of the Framework allows the public to have an input into the strategic approach for a future public art programme.

Ara Toi Otepoti – arts and culture strategy

20    There were 13 comments received relating to Ara Toi Otepoti – Dunedin’s arts and culture strategy. 

21    Submissions generally supported more investment in arts and culture funding and there were a number of requests for increased arts funding to support groups across the city (local museums, commitment to Toi Māori and art projects).

Dunedin Public Art Gallery

22    There were seven comments relating to the Dunedin Public Art Gallery.  There is $1 million included in the draft budget for rates funded DPAG art works acquisitions.

23    Submitters were split in their support for the increase in rates funding for DPAG art works acquisitions.  

Otago Museum

24    There were six comments received relating to the Otago Museum, including a funding request from the Otago Museum.  The Council may wish to request that the Otago Museum further develops the capital expenditure programme, along with funding options.  This could be considered by the Council during the development of the next Annual Plan 2019/20 as the current request lacks the necessary detail.

City of Literature

25    There were three comments relating to the city of literature.  Submitters were proud of Dunedin’s UNESCO City of Literature status.

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum

26    There were two comments relating to Toitū.  The draft Toitū Otago Settlers Museum budget takes into account efficiencies and savings to deliver a more cost effective service to ratepayers. The Museum’s Strategic Plan aims to reduce the ratepayer contribution by earning more external revenue.

Gasworks Museum

27    There was one comment received relating to the Gasworks Museum.  The budget for the Gasworks includes maintenance, rates, building WOF, insurance and depreciation. However, there is no operational component currently budgeted. Toitū staff are pleased to continue to provide support to the Gasworks Museum.

Mayfair Theatre

28    There was one comment received relating to the Mayfair Theatre.  The Mayfair Theatre has made a specific request to work more closely with Council. In 2016/17 Council funded an independent contractor to work with the Theatre to create a development plan that addresses current issues, and identifies future opportunities. Arts Advisors have regular connections with the Mayfair which include supporting the theatre to make progress on the plan.

Next steps

29    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Libraries and Museums Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Nick Dixon - Group Manager Ara Toi

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Libraries and Museums Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Libraries and Museums Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Regulatory Services - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Customer and Regulatory Services

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Regulatory Services Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Building Services

·           Compliance Solutions (includes Alcohol Licensing, Animal Services and Environmental Health)

·           Parking Operations

·           Parking Services (enforcement).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Regulatory Services Group.

 

community feedback

2      There were 105 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Regulatory Services Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

75+ parking fee

3      There were 54 comments relating to proposed fees for 75 plus permits. The proposed fee for 75 plus permits has been removed from the 10 year plan.

Mobility parking fee

4      There were 17 comments relating to proposed fees for mobility exemption permits.  The proposed fee for mobility exemption permits has been removed from the 10 year plan.

Parking services

5      There were 14 comments received relating to parking services.  A number of these related to the provision and availability of parking and were referred to Transportation as relevant to the proposed work on the Parking Strategy.  Reference was also made to the level of enforcement in suburban and outlying areas of the city.

6      Parking Services are currently recruiting new staff, including one additional FTE and once these new officers have completed their training there will be an increased focus on enforcement in outlying areas.

Dog control

7      There were 11 comments relating to dog control. 

8      In 2016, the Dog Control Bylaw was reviewed and widely consulted with the community. It is envisaged that the next review of this bylaw will be within three to five years.

9      Any surplus funds from dog registrations at the end of each financial year are used in accordance with the Dog Control Act 1996 for facilities and services relating to dogs. Dog park maintenance is undertaken on a regular basis and improvements carried out in response to customer feedback.

10    One comment related to the provision of dog exercise areas.  There are many places in the city where people can exercise their dogs including six dog parks (two with separate areas for small dogs), a number of tracks, reserves, beaches and other public areas.

Cat management

11    There were five comments relating to cat management.  Councils do not have statutory powers to protect native birdlife from feral or domestic cats. The DCC submitted a remit to Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) in 2017 to ask the Government to give councils powers to enact bylaws and have regulatory powers for cat control. LGNZ are now in discussion with Government.

Building services fee

12    There was two comments received relating to fees referring to ‘understanding charging fees for code compliance certificates’ and to ‘more conservative fees for people wanting to make their houses more energy efficient’. In recent times, Building Services has granted exemptions for the retro fitting of wall insulation for existing buildings. Additionally the Council does not charge processing fees for solar heating installation building consents (although Government fees are still applicable).

Noise control

13    There was one comment relating to noise control.  This is an operational matter and has been referred to the Environmental Health team to investigate.

Parking operations

14    There was one comment relating to parking operations, in regard to the accommodation of electric vehicles in the city.  The submitter requested that the Council provide for additional electrical vehicle (EV) rapid charging spaces. The Council is aware of a commercial operator planning to put in up to three new rapid chargers at various locations around Dunedin. Parking operations has undertaken work to improve the access to the existing rapid charger in the Filleul Street car park, and is investigating options for increasing the provision for EV parking immediately surrounding the present charger, which may include a review of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw.

Next steps

15    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Regulatory Services Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Adrian Blair - Group Manager Customer and Regulatory Services

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services and regulatory functions in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Regulatory Services Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Regulatory Services Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Waste Management - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Waste Management Group and includes Solid Waste and Environmental Solutions activities.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Waste Management Group.

 

community feedback

2      There were 102 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Waste Management Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Waste and Environmental Solutions - operational

3      There were 25 comments relating to operational waste and environmental solutions matters. 

4      Some submissions raised operational issues and concerns around waste services (e.g. rubbish dumping in particular areas).  Waste and environmental solutions will follow up with the relevant submitters through the usual procedures.

Waste minimisation

5      There were 24 comments relating to minimising waste. 

6      Submissions generally encouraged the Council to investigate opportunities for waste minimisation and some suggested particular initiatives and projects. The DCC Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) is currently under review, and will consider the possible expansion of services to include food organics, garden organics, e-waste, or other waste streams as appropriate. The WMMP also outlines the DCC's commitment to education, engagement, and collaboration in building local capability with regards to waste minimisation. The revised WMMP will be subject to a separate consultation process in early 2019.

Waste and environmental solutions - improvements

7      There were 22 comments relating to waste and environmental solutions improvements. 

8      Submissions suggested some improvements for waste and environmental solutions.  Staff will consider the suggested improvements as part of the review of the WMMP.

Kerbside collection

9      There were 17 comments relating to kerbside collection services. 

10    Some submissions requested that the Council consider collecting green waste, food waste; and the use of wheelie bins for general waste.  The WMMP review will consider the possible expansion of services to include food organics, garden organics, e-waste, or other waste streams as appropriate. This review will be used to inform the tender process for new kerbside collection contracts, and will be subject to a separate consultation process in early 2019.

Landfills

11    There were 14 comments relating to landfills and the Green Island Landfill. 

12    Some of the submissions commented on the high fees for landfills and other submissions commented on the Green Island Landfill.  Changes in the fees and charges for waste disposal at landfill have primarily been driven by increased Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) charges due to increased landfill tonnages and the lifting of the subsidised rate for ETS. Fees and charges have been categorised as ‘inclusive’ or ‘exclusive’ of ETS costs. The inclusive landfill charges include costs associated with ETS as these general waste loads contribute to landfill emissions.

13    A full schedule of fees is included in the ‘Adoption of 2018/19 Fees and Charges’ Report, separately on the agenda.  All waste to landfill attracts the Ministry for the Environments Waste Levy which is currently set at $10.00 per tonne, this increase is in addition to any DCC increase. Exclusive landfill charges do not attract ETS costs i.e. inert materials such as rubble and 100% vegetation loads that go to composting area. Fees and charges for inert materials have been decreased in order to align with market prices as this material is beneficially used for construction and cover at the landfill. Mixed and construction and demolition loads are no longer received by the landfill and the fees have been removed from the fees and charges schedule. This is because these loads often contain materials that would attract ETS being similar in composition to general waste. There are new fees for non-hazardous tanker waste and asbestos waste.

Next steps

14    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Waste Management Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Waste Management Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy – the Roading and Footpaths budgets will be an input into both of these documents.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Waste Management Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Community and Planning - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Community and Planning Group, and includes the following activities:

·           City development

·           Community development and events

·           Resource consents.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the funding requests including: the Refugee Resettlement Programme; ring-fencing of $95,000 from the city service /city project fund to support professional theatre activity within the city; and increasing the funding for events and festivals of $50,000 per annum.

b)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Community and Planning Group.

 

Funding requests

2      The following requests for funding were received, and are currently not included in the draft budgets. As a guide, an addition of $138k of operating expenditure would add approximately 0.1% to the 7.3% average rate increase proposed in the first year of the draft 10 year plan.

Organisation/s

Amount sought in 2018/19

Refugee resettlement programme (644613): Continued support for translation, interpreters, assistance with finding employment, establishing a base for the programme to operate from and staff to assist refugees with social integration.

Funding to improve access to Arabic interpreters is most important. Total requirement is $480K per annum, although the council is not being asked for all of this.  However the DCC should take a central role in coordination and be willing to step up if other funding sources fail.

The submitters ask that $200K be added to Community and Planning budget to support the Refugee Support Programme.

$200k

community feedback

3      There were 307 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Community and Planning Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Waterfront vision

4      There were 173 comments relating to the waterfront vision. 

5      Submissions generally supported the waterfront vision and commented on the opportunities for economic, tourism, and recreational growth. They commented on the forward-thinking vision, connection between city and harbour and the positive public space and development it would provide.

6      There was some concern about the cost and affordability of the vision. The funding of the implementation of the vision, is addressed in the report on the City to Waterfront Bridge connection. It is intended to be met by private investment, with central government funding being sought for the enabling infrastructure. 

7      Others questioned whether the area is suitable for development of this scale given: the cold windy environment; that the wharves are built on reclaimed land; and in light of predicted sea level rise. Concern was also raised about the development taking business from existing retailers and businesses in the CBD and that development could push the industrial sector out of the waterfront area.

8      Several submissions were concerned about the design of the harbour vision and some suggested that the design does not suit Dunedin’s character and heritage.

Urban development and design

9      There were 41 comments relating to urban development and design. 

10    A wide range of areas were proposed for urban design improvements in the central city, warehouse precinct, waterfront exchange square, Port Chalmers, Green Island and South Dunedin. Some submissions suggested that more destinations and social hubs like St Clair should be created.

11    Other comments were focused on how areas should be designed and ideas included: use Gothic revival style in designs; more pedestrian only areas along George Street / Octagon; to focus design on residents over visitors; no more pavers as not suitable for wheelchairs; and more historic style rather than modern design.

12    Submissions also recommended that the Council includes good community engagement in design.  Kāi Tahu sees itself as both a partner and participant in the development of the city, and would like to see local Rūnaka culture, including the Te Reo language and a shared narrative informing urban development and design.

Community development – grants and support

13    There were 20 comments relating to community development grants and support. 

14    There were a number of requests for increased community and arts funding to support groups across the city.  Current funding provided to the community and arts groups every year includes:

·           $1.8 million via rates relief and grants (community , city service / city project, small projects, neighbourhood matching, home insulation, landfill and community arts grants)

·           $540K to support community, premier and major events

·           $180K in Electricity Consumer grants to mitigate fuel poverty

·           Council also administers the Creative Communities and Puaka Matariki grants funds which account for $100K per year.

15    All current grant funds are oversubscribed, some by 100%.

16    In 2016/17 and 2017/18, the Council granted the Fortune Theatre $95k from the City Service/City Project fund. With the recent closure of the Fortune Theatre, the Council may want to consider ring fencing $95k from the City Service/City Project fund to “support professional theatre activity within the city” in 2018/19. The process around allocating the ring fenced funding would need to be determined.

Heritage

17    There were 19 comments relating to heritage. 

18    Submissions generally supported protecting heritage in Dunedin and some requested an increase to the Dunedin Heritage Fund. Particular areas of interest included heritage buildings South of Octagon Exchange / Lower Rattray; Cargill’s Castle; the cable car project; and establishing a Residential Heritage Steering Group.

19    One submitter was concerned that heritage protection limited the reuse of buildings and that concern around the appearance of heritage buildings needed to be balanced with their economic future.

Community development

20    There were 18 comments relating to community development. 

21    Submissions raised a range of matters including homelessness within Dunedin; social supports; disability and accessibility issues; communication with the South Dunedin community; youth engagement; links between migrants and the welcoming and retention of these migrants; and the Welcoming Communities pilot from MBIE.

22    Community Development staff work with other Council departments to ensure that the needs of all ‘vulnerable” groups e.g. migrants, youth, older people, people with disabilities, people on low incomes are considered in Council planning and services.

District Plan and resource management

23    There were 13 comments received relating to the District Plan and Resource Management Act. 

24    Submissions commented on a range of planning matters including: development being built on raised platforms in flood prone areas; support for tiny houses, co-op housing and similar in plan rules; preventing demolition by neglect and improving heritage buildings; quality of student housing; protecting high class soils from suburban expansions; and climate change.  Some of the submissions relate to operational matters and have been noted by staff.

25    The proposed second generation District Plan was notified in 2015, hearings have been held and decisions are scheduled to be released in September 2018.

Housing - general

26    There were 11 comments relating to housing. 

27    Submissions highlighted the needs of homeless people within the city and the need for affordable rental housing.

28    The Council has recognised the need for increased numbers of social, emergency, healthy and affordable housing within the city. Through the Mayor's Taskforce for Housing long term options for housing to achieve the city's community outcomes related to housing, will be considered. Recommendations will then be made by this cross-sector group to Council and other key stakeholders within the housing sector.

Events

29    There were six comments relating to events. 

30    Submitters supported more concerts at the Forsyth Barr Stadium, more places to host events around the city, and more festivals and events. Pasifika representatives requested an event that reflects their culture and Community Development and Events staff have offered to meet with them to discuss this further. The Council’s recently adopted Festivals and Events Plan 2018 – 2023 sets out the way in which the DCC and other stakeholders will enhance events within the city.

31    Public consultation on the Festivals and Events Plan 2018 – 2023 resulted in a number of requests for increased funding within this area.  Event organisers cited concerns around grants not keeping pace with the rising costs of organising quality festivals and events which showcase Dunedin.  DCC grant funding for festivals and events has only increased through CPI in the past five years.  However, costs for event organisers in wages, venue hire, and technical expertise have increased well beyond this. A review of the Grants Policy 2015 is currently underway and this feedback will be included within the review.

32    Festivals and events organisers requested multi-year grant funding.  The Community and Culture Committee adopted the Festivals and Events Plan 2018-2023 on 17 April 2018, where it was agreed that staff would prepare a request for additional funding as part of the 10 year plan deliberations. As a result, staff now recommend that the Council consider increasing the grant funding for events by $50k per annum.  Funding would be spread across the three contestable events areas: premier ($10k), major community ($30k) and local events ($10k).

Warehouse Precinct

33    There were three comments relating to the Warehouse Precinct.  There is $1.4 million included in the draft Community and Planning capital budget for Warehouse Precinct upgrades in the first year of the 10 year plan.

34    Two submissions supported investment in the inner city area and places like the warehouse precinct/waterfront, and creating good transport links to get people there and more high density housing in these areas.  One submission questioned investment in Vogel Street and suggested Lower Rattray Street should be a priority, but with improvements paid for by property owners.

Youth engagement

35    There were three comments relating to youth engagement. 

36    The need to engage with young people is noted and endorsed. The Dunedin Youth Council took an active role in supporting engagement for the 10 year plan. Both this group and the Youth Action Committee are keen to continue to engage with young people on behalf of Council and represent the youth voice to staff and Councillors. Members of both groups and Community Development staff have been involved in developing a Youth Vision and Charter with wider community organisations. A report on this will be provided to Council within the next few months.

Next steps

37    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Community and Planning Group will be included in the final 10 year plan.

 

Signatories

Author:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services and regulatory functions in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The activities of the Community and Planning Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 year plan deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Community and Planning Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Economic Development - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Enterprise Dunedin and Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Economic Development Group, and includes the following activities:

·           Destination Dunedin

·           Economic Development

·           Dunedin i-Site Visitor Centre (Visitor Centre).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Economic Development Group.

 

community feedback

2      There were 121 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Economic Development Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Economic development and employment

3      There were 51 comments relating to economic development and employment.

4      The majority of the submissions support the vision of the Economic Development Strategy (EDS).  There was a balanced split between increasing investment in economic development and managing and prioritised spending and planning for the 10 years.

5      Submitters were keen to see job growth and increased support for businesses and ease of doing business in Dunedin. A number of the submitters identified and endorsed Councils reinvestment into projects to attract and retain skills and talent; especially the younger generation.  Common themes with the submissions included the need to ensure cultural diversity in terms of people and experiences, and the value of Dunedin’s natural national environments and heritage.

6      A submission was received from the Digital Community Trust advising the Council to put in place a strategy for Dunedin to become a 'small smart city,’ creating a unique blend of innovation, lifestyle and growth that becomes part of the Dunedin Brand.

7      A number of Enterprise Dunedin actions are underway, including supporting business innovation through collaboration in education, health technologies, niche manufacturing and engineering, start up business, ICT and creative industries, energy, food resilience and tourism). 

8      Enterprise Dunedin is involved in a wide range of projects including:

·           Delivering the Regional Business Partnership to improve companies growth prospects ideally for exporting;

·           Working with other councils in the Otago Region around facilitating projects which fit the Regional Growth Fund criteria administered through MBIE;

·           Facilitating the Vocational Pathways workstream initially focussed on connecting schools, tertiary and businesses in the creative industries;

·           Assisting companies in connecting migrants to the most appropriate support;

·           Working with the Grow Dunedin Partnership and Council to determine priorities, resourcing and delivery regarding the EDS and associated projects; and

·           Working with the Digital Communities Trust and smart city initiatives.

Tourism

9      There were 32 comments relating to tourism.

10    Overall the submissions support tourism, with some proposing a focus to attract high value international visitors. The most common themes were around ensuring the infrastructure has the capacity to support tourism (eg. accommodation, roading improvements and city beautification), and that impacts of tourism on the environment are sustainable.

11    The Dunedin Destination Plan outlines how the city proposes to market and manage Dunedin as a compelling destination. It sets out how Dunedin can attract new visitors, students, migrants, workers and investors, and how the Council can coordinate with other strategic areas to manage the city’s infrastructure capacity.

Food resilience

12    There were 17 comments relating to food resilience. 

13    Most of the submissions support food resilience, with some focussing on local food as a key to building local identity and enabling residents and local businesses to make more conscious food decisions.

14    Funding for the Good Food Dunedin Coordinator and project costs have been included in the draft 10 ten year plan operating budgets.

Energy plan

15    There were 14 comments relating to the delivery of the Energy Plan. 

16    Submitters were generally supportive of the Energy Plan’s objectives and recommended increased funding for the Energy Plan. The topics most frequently raised by submitters were around electric vehicle infrastructure and developing a new low-carbon district energy system for Dunedin.

17    The delivery of the Energy Plan is included in the Enterprise Dunedin team’s resourcing. Current priorities and actions are focussed on developing a city energy scheme and electric vehicles. The Energy Plan Coordinator will work with the Grow Dunedin Partnership and Council to determine priorities, resourcing and delivery regarding the Energy Plan.

City marketing and promotion

18    There were six comments relating to city marketing and promotion.

19    Overall submitters are supportive of city marketing and promotion. The Dunedin Destination Plan outlines how the city proposes to market and manage Dunedin as a compelling destination. The plan includes action areas that will be used to inform specific activities moving forward.

Sister cities

20    There was one comment relating to sister cities which recommended Dunedin can develop further cultural diversity by strengthening ties with Argentina and Chile. 

Next steps

21    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Economic Development Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

22    A review of Enterprise Dunedin is underway and will inform the future work programme.

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

John Christie - Director Enterprise Dunedin 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Economic Development Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 Year Plan Deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Economic Development Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Governance and Support Services - Summary of Community Feedback

Department: Finance and Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to summarise the community feedback received on projects and plans related to the Governance and Support Services Group, and includes these activities:

·           Business Information Services (BIS)

·           Civic and Administration (including Civil Defence)

·           Corporate Leadership

·           Corporate Policy

·           Council Communications and Marketing (CCM)

·           Customer Services Agency (CSA)

·           Finance

·           Fleet Operations

·           Human Resources

·           Investment Account

·           Waipori Fund

·           Warm Dunedin.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the feedback from the community on projects and plans related to the Governance and Support Services Group.

 

community feedback

2      There were 132 submissions/comments specifically tagged to projects and plans related to the Governance and support Services Group.  There may have been more references on these topics included in other submissions, and therefore the number of comments for each topic is indicative only and this report provides a general summary of the community feedback received.

Climate change adaptation and planning

3      There were 79 comments received relating to climate change adaptation and planning.

4      Most submissions on climate issues raised the need to deal with sea level rise and wider climate change impacts.

5      The DCC has been working on climate change adaptation for several years and the current focus of this work is South Dunedin, which faces significant impacts. The DCC is also exploring tracking and monitoring of climate change related costs and planning for improvements in infrastructure to better cope with related events such as flooding. Council will be presented with a report for consideration that provides a high level carbon impact assessment of the projects and budgets in the 10 year plan.

Collaboration and partnerships

6      There were 11 comments received relating to collaboration and partnerships. 

7      The ongoing partnership of stakeholders, like the Department of Conservation and the University of Otago, is critical when it comes to delivering on key city strategic goals and initiatives like those set out in Te Ao Tūroa. Also critical is ensuring the voices of particular groups like youth and disabilities are heard.

8      Partnership with iwi is dealt with in a separate report to the 10 year plan deliberations.

DCC communications, marketing and promotion

9      There were 11 comments received relating to DCC communications, marketing and promotion.

10    Many of the comments are operational. Some submissions requested that the Council incorporate more Māori Tikanga with road signs, place names, and art and making stories about the city, both Maori and European more visible. Council Communications and Marketing (CCM) is working in conjunction with Parks and Recreation Services and others to add and restore our heritage signs and this work is ongoing.

11    Some submissions requested improved accessiblity for the deaf, including captioning of all videos and having a sign language interpreter available at all Council and committee meetings. The DCC website is already set up with the recommended large print option, high contrast text and read speaker read aloud capability. CCM has provided two sign language interpreted videos, but to do so for every meeting is not currently funded and captioning accurately is difficult and time consuming. One of the difficulties in Dunedin is there are only two qualified NZSL interpreters available.

Staff – operational

12    There were nine comments received relating to operational staff matters.

Sustainability

13    There were seven comments received relating to sustainability.

14    The DCC has sustainability as one of two key principles underpinning the city's strategic framework. The strategic framework contains strategic goals, including for the environment and transport, that relate to creating a more sustainable and resilient city. The DCC is also working on climate change adaptation and mitigation, with a current focus on South Dunedin and looking at options for alleviating flood and sea level rise issues.

Elected members

15    There were seven comments received relating to elected members. Submissions included reference to the relationship between governance and management, training for Community Board members and transparency.

Dunedin hospital

16    There were five comments received which supported the Dunedin hospital rebuild. Submissions included reference to utilising local labour in the rebuild; ensuring there is adequate hospital parking; and that the Council should prioritise working with the Government on the hospital rebuild.

Emergency management

17    There were two comments received relating to emergency management. The comments will be forwarded to Civil Defence Emergency Management, as this function is now managed at the regional level by the Otago Regional Council (ORC).

Archives

18    There was one comment received relating to archives management which requested that the Council consider a joint archive storage facility with the ORC.

19    The DCC is looking to identify and progress both an interim solution to better protect the archives in the short term, and a longer term options that secure our civic, cultural and arts assets. While these assets are not at immediate risk, weather events that impact on the city mean this issue is being addressed as a priority.

Next steps

20    The level of funding determined by the Council for the Governance and Support Services Group will be included in the final 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Gavin Logie - Financial Controller

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Governance and Support Services Group contributes to the delivery of all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

Major issues and implications for sustainability will be discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

10 year plan/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

These considerations are the subject of the report.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The report informs 10 Year Plan Deliberations and a full formal consultation has been undertaken.

Engagement – external

Community feedback on the Governance and Support Services Group has been summarised in the report.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the analysis of the community feedback.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards may be interested in this report.

 

 


Ten Year Plan Hearings/Deliberations

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Adoption of 2018/19 Fees and Charges

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The schedule of fees and charges for the 2018/19 financial year is presented to the Council for adoption.

2      Fees and charges are presented for adoption in advance of th