Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                             Tuesday 26 June 2018

Time:                            1.00 pm

Venue:                          Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Chris Staynes

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Damian Newell

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Cr Kate Wilson

 

 

Senior Officer                                Sue Bidrose, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer       Pam Jordan

 

 

 

Pam Jordan

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Pam.Jordan@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                    PAGE

 

1        Opening                                                                                                   4

2        Public Forum                                                                                              4

2.1   Joy Hall - Building Consent                                                                    4

3        Apologies                                                                                                  4

4        Confirmation of Agenda                                                                                4

5        Declaration of Interest                                                                                 5

6        Confirmation of Minutes                                                                              19

6.1   Ordinary Council meeting - 29 May 2018                                                 19  

Minutes of Committees

7          Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee - 11 June 2018                          20

8        Community and Culture Committee - 12 June 2018                                           21

9        Planning and Environment Committee - 12 June 2018                                        22

Minutes of Community Boards

10        Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 18 April 2018                                           23

11      Otago Peninsula Community Board - 19 April 2018                                            24

12      Strath Taieri Community Board - 19 April 2018                                                25

13      Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board - 2 May 2018                                                 26

14      West Harbour Community Board - 2 May 2018                                                 27

15      Saddle Hill Community Board - 3 May 2018                                                     28

Reports

16        Adoption of the 10 Year Plan 2018-28                                                            29

17      Setting of Rates for the 2018/19 Financial Year                                                34

18      Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy Review 2018                                       59

19      Waste Futures 2023 Project                                                                         88

20      Statements of Intent for Dunedin City Holdings Limited, Subsidiaries and Associate Companies                                                                                              97

21      Revocation of Bylaws                                                                                 98

22      Naming of Two New Roads off Hagart-Alexander Drive, Mosgiel                          108

23      Parking Survey Feedback                                                                           115

24      Traffic and Parking Bylaw Review                                                                 132               

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                            149

 

 


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

1     Opening

Dr Lux Selvanesan, Dunedin Hindu Community, will open the meeting with a prayer.

2     Public Forum

2.1  Joy Hall - Building Consent

Joy Hall wishes to address the Council on an issue with zoning which has an impact on their Building Consent.

3     Apologies

An apology has been received from Cr Aaron Hawkins.

 

That the Council:

 

Accepts the apology from Cr Aaron Hawkins.

4     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Elected Members Register of Interest

7

  



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26 June 2018

 

 

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Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.     Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a staff member and any private or other external interest they might have.

2.     Staff members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Executive Leadership Team's Interest Register.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Executive Leadership Team Register of Interest

17

  



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26 June 2018

 

 

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26 June 2018

 

 

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council meeting - 29 May 2018

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 29 May 2018 as a correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Ordinary Council meeting  held on 29 May 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Minutes of Committees

Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee - 11 June 2018

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee meeting held on 11 June 2018.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Infrastructure Services and Networks Committee held on 11 June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Community and Culture Committee - 12 June 2018

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Community and Culture Committee meeting held on 12 June 2018.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Community and Culture Committee held on 12 June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Planning and Environment Committee - 12 June 2018

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Planning and Environment Committee meeting held on 12 June 2018.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Planning and Environment Committee held on 12 June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

   


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Minutes of Community Boards

Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 18 April 2018

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting held on 18 April 2018.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Waikouaiti Coast Community Board held on 18 April 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Otago Peninsula Community Board - 19 April 2018

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Otago Peninsula Community Board meeting held on 19 April 2018.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Otago Peninsula Community Board held on 19 April 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Strath Taieri Community Board - 19 April 2018

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Strath Taieri Community Board meeting held on 19 April 2018.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Strath Taieri Community Board held on 19 April 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board - 2 May 2018

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board meeting held on 2 May 2018.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board held on 2 May 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

West Harbour Community Board - 2 May 2018

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the West Harbour Community Board meeting held on 2 May 2018

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of West Harbour Community Board held on 2 May 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Saddle Hill Community Board - 3 May 2018

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Saddle Hill Community Board meeting held on 3 May 2018.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Saddle Hill Community Board held on 3 May 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

   


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

Reports

 

Adoption of the 10 Year Plan 2018-28

Department: Community and Planning and Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      This report recommends the adoption of the final 10 year plan 2018-28 and describes changes made to the 10 year plan 2018-28 since it was approved for consultation in February 2018.

2      Audit New Zealand is currently auditing the 10 year plan 2018-28 document and will provide the Council with an ‘Independent Auditor’s report’ at the meeting.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts the revenue and financing policy, development contributions policy and rates remission and postponement policy for inclusion in the 10 year plan 2018-28.

b)     Adopts the 10 year plan 2018-28.

c)     Authorises the Council’s Chief Executive Officer, to make any minor editorial changes resulting from the final quality checks that will occur prior to the final printing of the 10 year plan 2018-28 document.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requires all local authorities to develop a 10 year plan (also known as a long term plan or LTP). The purpose of a 10 year plan is to: describe the Council’s activities; describe the community outcomes of Dunedin; provide integrated decision-making and co-ordination of resources; provide a long-term focus for the decisions and activities of the Council; and provide a basis for accountability of the local authority to the community.

4      Schedule 10 of the LGA specifies the minimum information and content that must be included in the 10 year plan, including: community outcomes that describe the strategic directions; groups of activities (describing levels of service, capital expenditure, and funding impact statement); Council controlled organisations; financial strategy; infrastructure strategy; policies; forecast financial statements; significant forecasting assumptions; and other statements.

5      The 10 year plan 2018-28 must be adopted before the commencement of the first year to which it relates (1 July 2018), and continues in force until the close of the third consecutive year to which it relates.

6      Feedback from the community on the proposals for the 10 year plan 2018-28 and consultation document was sought from 14 March to 23 April 2018. The Council met in April and May 2018 to hear submissions, deliberate and make final decisions regarding submissions and community feedback received on the 10 year plan 2018-28.

DISCUSSION

7      The final 10 year plan 2018-28 document has been developed based on the content of the consultation document and supporting documents approved by the Council on 27 February 2018. The substantive changes are:

a)     The document reflects the resolutions made by the Council during deliberations and decision making in May 2018;

b)     The financial statements have been updated to reflect a forecast year end position at 30 June 2018.  Debt is forecast to be $199 million;

c)     The capital expenditure budgets for renewals in Property and 3 Waters include an additional allowance for inflation in the 2022-28 years;

d)     The operating budget reflects updated interest expense due to the revised debt profile, additional funding for project planning and feasibility work and increased maintenance budget in the last three years of the plan due to the retention of investment properties; and

e)     The financial strategy includes additional content regarding affordability and financial resilience.

Audit of the 10 year plan 2018-28

8      The final 10 year plan 2018-28 will include an opinion from the Auditor General on the extent to which the Council has complied with the legislative purpose of a 10 year plan and the quality of the information and assumptions underlying the forecast information provided in the 10 year plan 2018-28.

9      Audit New Zealand (Audit NZ) and the Office of the Auditor General (OAG) have reviewed the changes made to the 10 year plan 2018-28 content since the audit of the consultation document and supporting documents in February 2018. Consideration has also been given to the special consultative procedure undertaken by the Council. 

10    An update on the status of the audit opinion will be given at the meeting. Audit NZ will also present an ‘Independent Auditor’s Report’ at the meeting and this report will be included in the final 10 year plan 2018-28 document. 

Final quality checks

11    To ensure high editorial standards are achieved in the final 10 year plan 2018-28, the adopted version will require a full editorial quality check. This check will be completed within the statutory timeframes. Any required editorial changes can be achieved through delegating authority to approve editorial changes to the Chief Executive.

OPTIONS

12    The Council is legislatively required to adopt the 10 year plan 2018-28 by 30 June 2018, therefore there are no options applicable to this report.

NEXT STEPS

13    Once adopted the 10 year plan 2018-28 will be subject to final quality checks, graphic designed and printed for public distribution in hard copy and on the Council’s website. A Microsoft Word copy of the 10 year plan 2018-28 will be available on the website from 1 July 2018 and will be replaced by the final graphic designed version as soon as the print files are completed.

14    Print copies of the 10 year plan 2018-28 will be available for the public by mid July 2018.

 

Signatories

Author:

Tami  Sargeant  - Senior Policy Analyst

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - General Manager Strategy and Governance

Dave Tombs - General Manager Finance and Commercial

Attachments

To follow.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the 10 year plan enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and meets the current and future needs of the Dunedin communities for good quality public services in a way that is most cost effective for households and businesses.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The 10 year plan contributes to all of the objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities; the community outcomes; and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The 10 year plan provides a mechanism for Māori to contribute to local decision-making.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability. Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report concludes the development of the 10 year plan 2018-28.

Financial considerations

The financial implications of the 10 year plan are discussed in this report.

Significance

The report concludes the 10 year plan process which required full formal consultation.

Engagement – external

The use of new, more accessible consultation materials and channels saw a high level of community engagement on this 10 year plan, with 5,661 separate items of feedback received.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the 10 year plan.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

As noted in this report, the Council is legislatively required to adopt the 10 year plan 2018-28 by 30 June 2018.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans have been considered in the development of the 10 year plan; and Community Boards are involved in the development of the 10 year plan.

 

 


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

 

Setting of Rates for the 2018/19 Financial Year

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The Council has adopted the 10 year plan 2018-28 including the Funding Impact Statement.  Council now needs to resolve to set the rates as provided for in the Funding Impact Statement for the 2018/19 year.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Set the following rates under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 on rating units in the district for the financial year commencing 1 July 2018 and ending on 30 June 2019.

1      General Rate

A general rate set under section 13 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 made on every rating unit, assessed on a differential basis as described below:

·           A rate of 0.3181 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "residential" category.

·           A rate of 0.3022 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "lifestyle" category.

·           A rate of 0.7795 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial" category.

·           A rate of 0.5567 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "residential heritage bed and breakfasts" category.

·           A rate of 0.2543 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "farmland" category.

·           A rate of 0.0600 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the Forsyth Barr Stadium category.

2      Community Services Rate

A targeted rate for community services, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           $233.50 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories.

·           $233.50 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial and Forsyth Barr Stadium" categories.

3      Kerbside Recycling Rate

A targeted rate for kerbside recycling, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           $66.30 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories.

·           $66.30 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial" category.

4      Drainage Rates

A targeted rate for drainage, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           $535.00 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·           $267.50 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·           $535.00 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial, residential institutions, schools and Forsyth Barr Stadium" categories and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·           $267.50 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial, residential institutions and schools" categories and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·           $102.25 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "church" category and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

Rating units which are not "connected" to the scheme and which are not "serviceable" will not be liable for this rate.  Drainage is a combined targeted rate for sewage disposal and stormwater.  Sewage disposal makes up 83.9% of the drainage rate, and stormwater makes up 16.1%.  Non-rateable land will not be liable for the stormwater component of the drainage targeted rate.  Rates demands for the drainage targeted rate for non-rateable land will therefore be charged at 83.9%.

5      Commercial Drainage Rates – Capital Value

A targeted rate for drainage, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           A rate of 0.2881 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial and residential institution" category and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·           A rate of 0.1441 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial" category and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·           A rate of 0.2161 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "school" category and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·           A rate of 0.1081 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "school" category and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·           A rate of 0.0225 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the Forsyth Barr Stadium category.

This rate shall not apply to properties in Karitane, Middlemarch, Seacliff, Waikouaiti and Warrington.  This rate shall not apply to churches.  Drainage is a combined targeted rate for sewage disposal and stormwater.  Sewage disposal makes up 83.9% of the drainage rate, and stormwater makes up 16.1%.  Non-rateable land will not be liable for the stormwater component of the drainage targeted rate.  Rates demands for the drainage targeted rate for non-rateable land will therefore be charged at 83.9%.

6      Water Rates

A targeted rate for water supply, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           $387.00 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of any "connected" rating unit which receives an ordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws excepting properties in Karitane, Merton, Rocklands/Pukerangi, Seacliff, Waitati, Warrington, East Taieri, West Taieri and North Taieri.

·           $193.50 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of any "serviceable"  rating unit to which connection is available to receive an ordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws excepting properties in Karitane, Merton, Rocklands/Pukerangi, Seacliff, Waitati, Warrington, East Taieri, West Taieri and North Taieri.

·           $387.00 (including GST) per unit of water being one cubic metre (viz.  1,000 litres) per day supplied at a constant rate of flow during a full 24 hour period to any "connected"  rating unit situated in Karitane, Merton, Seacliff, Waitati, Warrington, West Taieri, East Taieri or North Taieri.

·           $193.50 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of any "serviceable" rating unit situated in Waitati, Warrington, West Taieri, East Taieri or North Taieri.  This rate shall not apply to the availability of water in Merton, Karitane or Seacliff. 

7      Fire Protection Rates

A targeted rate for the provision of a fire protection service, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           A rate of 0.0800 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on all rating units in the "commercial" category.  This rate shall not apply to churches.

·           A rate of 0.0600 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on all rating units in the "residential institutions" category. 

·           A rate of 0.0090 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the Forsyth Barr Stadium category.

·           $116.10 (including GST) for each separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit within the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" category that is not receiving an ordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws.

8      Water Rates – Quantity of Water

A targeted rate for the quantity of water provided to any rating unit fitted with a water meter, being an extraordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws, set under section 19 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, according to the following scale of charges (GST inclusive):

 

Annual Meter Rental Charge

20mm nominal diameter

$148.00

25mm nominal diameter

$190.00

30mm nominal diameter

$211.00

40mm nominal diameter

$239.00

50mm nominal diameter

$484.00

80mm nominal diameter

$598.00

100mm nominal diameter

$631.00

150mm nominal diameter

$907.00

300mm nominal diameter

$1,177.00

Hydrant Standpipe

$586.00

Reconnection Fee

$397.00

Special Reading Fee

$54.00

 

Backflow Prevention Charge

Backflow Preventer Test Fee

$98.00

Incomplete Application Fee (hourly rate)

$40.00

Rescheduled Backflow Preventer Test Fee

$56.00

 

Water Charge

Merton, Rocklands, Hindon and individual farm supplied Bulk Raw Water Tariff

$0.11 per cubic metre

All other treated water per cubic metre

$1.60 per cubic metre

Disconnection of Water Supply – AWSCI to excavate

$221.00

Disconnection of Water Supply – DCC contractor to excavate

$900.00

Where the supply of a quantity of water is subject to this Quantity of Water Targeted Rate, the rating unit will not be liable for any other targeted rate for the supply of the same water.

 

9      Allanton Drainage Rate

A targeted rate for the capital contribution towards the Allanton Wastewater Collection System, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, of $411.00 (including GST) per rating unit, to every rating unit paying their contribution towards the scheme as a targeted rate over 20 years.  Liability for the rate is on the basis of the provision of the service to each rating unit.  The Allanton area is shown in the map below:

Allanton_AP map

10    Blanket Bay Drainage Rate

A targeted rate for the capital contribution towards the Blanket Bay Drainage System, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, of $636.00 (including GST) per rating unit, to every rating unit paying their contribution towards the scheme as a targeted rate over 20 years.  Liability for the rate is on the basis of the provision of the service to each rating unit.  The Blanket Bay area is shown in the map below:

Blanket Bay

11    Curles Point Drainage Rate

A targeted rate for the capital contribution towards the Curles Point Drainage System, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, of $749.00 (including GST) per rating unit, to every rating unit paying their contribution towards the scheme as a targeted rate over 20 years.  Liability for the rate is on the basis of the provision of the service to each rating unit.  The Curles Point area is shown in the map below:

Curles Point

12    Tourism/Economic Development Rate

A targeted rate for Tourism/Economic Development, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           0.0142 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial" category.

·           0.0013 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the Forsyth Barr Stadium category.

13    Warm Dunedin Targeted Rate Scheme

A targeted rate for the Warm Dunedin Targeted Rate Scheme, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, per rating unit in the Warm Dunedin Targeted Rate Scheme. 

The targeted rate scheme provides a way for homeowners to install insulation and/or clean heating.  The targeted rate covers the cost and an annual interest rate.  The interest rates have been and will be:

Rates commencing 1 July 2013 and 1 July 2014 8%

Rates commencing 1 July 2015 and 1 July 2016 8.3%

Rates commencing 1 July 2017 7.8%

Rates commencing 1 July 2018 7.2%

14    Private Street Lighting Rate

A targeted rate for the purpose of recovering the cost of private street lights, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·           $149.40 (including GST) per private street light divided by the number of separately used or inhabited parts of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential and lifestyle" categories in the private streets as identified in the schedule below.

·           $149.40 (including GST) per private street light divided by the number of rating units for all rating units in the "commercial" category in the private streets as identified in the schedule below. 

1-10

Achilles Avenue

9

Glengarry Court

1

Alton Avenue

10

Glengarry Court

2

Alton Avenue

11

Glengarry Court

2A

Alton Avenue

12

Glengarry Court

3

Alton Avenue

13

Glengarry Court

4

Alton Avenue

14

Glengarry Court

5

Alton Avenue

15

Glengarry Court

6

Alton Avenue

16

Glengarry Court

7

Alton Avenue

17

Glengarry Court

8

Alton Avenue

18

Glengarry Court

9

Alton Avenue

19

Glengarry Court

7

Angle Avenue

20

Glengarry Court

9

Angle Avenue

21

Glengarry Court

11

Angle Avenue

22

Glengarry Court

20

Angle Avenue

23

Glengarry Court

22

Angle Avenue

24

Glengarry Court

24

Angle Avenue

48

Glenross Street

43

Arawa Street

50

Glenross Street

47

Arawa Street

54

Glenross Street

17

Awa Toru Drive

56

Glenross Street

19

Awa Toru Drive

58

Glenross Street

21

Awa Toru Drive

60

Glenross Street

23

Awa Toru Drive

110

Glenross Street

25

Awa Toru Drive

114

Glenross Street

27

Awa Toru Drive

116

Glenross Street

29

Awa Toru Drive

230

Gordon Road

31

Awa Toru Drive

229

Gordon Road

33

Awa Toru Drive

34

Grandview Crescent

35

Awa Toru Drive

10

Halsey Street

37

Awa Toru Drive

1

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

39

Awa Toru Drive

2

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

41

Awa Toru Drive

3

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

43

Awa Toru Drive

4

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

60A

Balmacewen Road

5

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

60B

Balmacewen Road

6

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

62

Balmacewen Road

7

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

64

Balmacewen Road

8

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

1

Balmoral Avenue

9

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

2

Balmoral Avenue

10

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

3

Balmoral Avenue

11

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

4

Balmoral Avenue

12

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

5

Balmoral Avenue

14

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

6

Balmoral Avenue

15

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

7

Balmoral Avenue

16

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

8

Balmoral Avenue

17

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

9

Balmoral Avenue

18

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

10

Balmoral Avenue

19

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

11

Balmoral Avenue

20

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

12

Balmoral Avenue

21

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

16

Balmoral Avenue

22

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

17

Balmoral Avenue

23

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

19

Barclay Street

24

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

211

Bay View Road

25

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

211A

Bay View Road

26

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

211B

Bay View Road

4

Harold Street

1

Beaufort Street

12

Harold Street

3

Beaufort Street

70a

Hazel Avenue

119

Belford Street

70

Hazel Avenue

12

Bell Crescent

72

Hazel Avenue

14

Bell Crescent

215a

Helensburgh Road

24

Bell Crescent

217a

Helensburgh Road

26

Bell Crescent

217b

Helensburgh Road

7

Bishop Verdon Close

219

Helensburgh Road

9

Bishop Verdon Close

219a

Helensburgh Road

10

Bishop Verdon Close

219b

Helensburgh Road

11

Bishop Verdon Close

221

Helensburgh Road

12

Bishop Verdon Close

223

Helensburgh Road

8

Bonnington Street

49

Highcliff Road

8a

Bonnington Street

49A

Highcliff Road

10

Bonnington Street

51

Highcliff Road

20K

Brighton Road

57

Highcliff Road

20J

Brighton Road

295

Highcliff Road

20H

Brighton Road

297

Highcliff Road

20G

Brighton Road

313

Highcliff Road

20F

Brighton Road

315a

Highcliff Road

20E

Brighton Road

315b

Highcliff Road

20D

Brighton Road

317

Highcliff Road

20C

Brighton Road

16

Highgate

20B

Brighton Road

18

Highgate

20A

Brighton Road

20

Highgate

20

Brighton Road

34a

Highgate

34

Burgess Street

34

Highgate

36

Burgess Street

216

Highgate

38

Burgess Street

218

Highgate

40

Burgess Street

144A

Highgate

42

Burgess Street

144B

Highgate

44

Burgess Street

146

Highgate

46

Burgess Street

146A

Highgate

48

Burgess Street

148

Highgate

50

Burgess Street

11

Irmo Street

181

Burt Street

12

Irmo Street

183

Burt Street

9

Kilgour Street

185

Burt Street

11

Kilgour Street

7

Bush Road, Mosgiel

15

Kilgour Street

64

Caldwell Street

20

Kinvig Street

66

Caldwell Street

22

Kinvig Street

80

Caldwell Street

2

Koremata Street

82

Caldwell Street

4

Koremata Street

1

Campbell Lane

12

Koremata Street

4

Campbell Lane

3

Lawson Street

5

Campbell Lane

4

Leithton Close

6

Campbell Lane

6

Leithton Close

7

Campbell Lane

9

Leithton Close

8

Campbell Lane

10

Leithton Close

9

Campbell Lane

11

Leithton Close

10

Campbell Lane

14

Leithton Close

11

Campbell Lane

15

Leithton Close

12

Campbell Lane

18

Leithton Close

13

Campbell Lane

19

Leithton Close

14

Campbell Lane

21

Leithton Close

15

Campbell Lane

22

Leithton Close

30

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

23

Leithton Close

32

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

26

Leithton Close

34

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

27

Leithton Close

36

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

28

Leithton Close

22

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

29

Leithton Close

24

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

32

Leithton Close

26

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

33

Leithton Close

28

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

36

Leithton Close

150

Chapman Street

5

Leven Street

150A

Chapman Street

2

Leyton Terrace

152

Chapman Street

21-67

Lock Street

12

Clearwater Street

23a

London Street

14

Clearwater Street

25

London Street

16

Clearwater Street

1-25

London Street

18

Clearwater Street

2-25

London Street

20

Clearwater Street

3-25

London Street

22

Clearwater Street

8

Lynwood Avenue

24

Clearwater Street

10

Lynwood Avenue

26

Clearwater Street

12c

Lynwood Avenue

28

Clearwater Street

12b

Lynwood Avenue

30

Clearwater Street

12a

Lynwood Avenue

32

Clearwater Street

12

Lynwood Avenue

34

Clearwater Street

14

Lynwood Avenue

36

Clearwater Street

3

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

22

Cole Street

5

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

11

Corstorphine Road

7

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

11A

Corstorphine Road

9

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

13

Corstorphine Road

11

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

15

Corstorphine Road

13

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

17

Corstorphine Road

15

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

21

Corstorphine Road

17

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

23

Corstorphine Road

19

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

25

Corstorphine Road

210

Main South Road, Green Island

11

Craighall Crescent

340

Main South Road, Green Island

15

Craighall Crescent

380

Main South Road, Green Island

1

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

1

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

2

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

2

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

4

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

3

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

6

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

4

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

8

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

5

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

10

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

6

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

12

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

7

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

21

Davies Street

8

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

22

Davies Street

9

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

1

Devon Place

10

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

2

Devon Place

11

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

3

Devon Place

12

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

4

Devon Place

13

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

5

Devon Place

14

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

6

Devon Place

15

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

7

Devon Place

11

Malvern Street

9

Devon Place

15

Malvern Street

10

Devon Place

17a

Malvern Street

11

Devon Place

30

Marne Street

12

Devon Place

32

Marne Street

13

Devon Place

42

Marne Street

14

Devon Place

44

Marne Street

15

Devon Place

46

Marne Street

16

Devon Place

48

Marne Street

17

Devon Place

50

Marne Street

18

Devon Place

2

Meldrum Street

19

Devon Place

10

Meldrum Street

20

Devon Place

33

Melville Street

139b

Doon Street

14

Middleton Road

139a

Doon Street

16

Middleton Road

139

Doon Street

18

Middleton Road

141

Doon Street

20

Middleton Road

143

Doon Street

22

Middleton Road

145

Doon Street

24

Middleton Road

149

Doon Street

26

Middleton Road

151

Doon Street

28

Middleton Road

5

Dorset Street

30

Middleton Road

7

Dorset Street

37

Middleton Road

10

Dorset Street

37a

Middleton Road

11

Dorset Street

39

Middleton Road

12

Dorset Street

43

Middleton Road

14

Dorset Street

47a

Middleton Road

16

Dorset Street

19

Montague Street

18

Dorset Street

21

Montague Street

20

Dorset Street

23

Montague Street

21

Dorset Street

29

Moray Place

17

Duckworth Street

415

Moray Place

19

Duckworth Street

72

Newington Avenue

21

Duckworth Street

37

Norwood Street

35

Duckworth Street

41

Norwood Street

37

Duckworth Street

39

Pacific Street

39

Duckworth Street

1

Pembrey Street

39a

Duckworth Street

2

Pembrey Street

41

Duckworth Street

3

Pembrey Street

47

Duckworth Street

4

Pembrey Street

49

Duckworth Street

5

Pembrey Street

53

Duckworth Street

6

Pembrey Street

 

Dunedin Airport

7

Pembrey Street

1–31

Eastbourne Street

8

Pembrey Street

2–31

Eastbourne Street

10

Pembrey Street

3–31

Eastbourne Street

11

Pembrey Street

4–31

Eastbourne Street

264

Pine Hill Road

5–31

Eastbourne Street

264a

Pine Hill Road

6–31

Eastbourne Street

266B

Pine Hill Road

7–31

Eastbourne Street

266A

Pine Hill Road

8–31

Eastbourne Street

268A

Pine Hill Road

9–31

Eastbourne Street

268B

Pine Hill Road

10–31

Eastbourne Street

270

Pine Hill Road

11–31

Eastbourne Street

272

Pine Hill Road

12–31

Eastbourne Street

274

Pine Hill Road

13–31

Eastbourne Street

278A

Pine Hill Road

14–31

Eastbourne Street

278B

Pine Hill Road

15–31

Eastbourne Street

390

Pine Hill Road

16–31

Eastbourne Street

409

Pine Hill Road

17–31

Eastbourne Street

411

Pine Hill Road

18–31

Eastbourne Street

5

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

19–31

Eastbourne Street

6

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

20–31

Eastbourne Street

8

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

21–31

Eastbourne Street

9

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

22–31

Eastbourne Street

10

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

23–31

Eastbourne Street

11

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

24–31

Eastbourne Street

12

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

25–31

Eastbourne Street

13

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

26–31

Eastbourne Street

14

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

27–31

Eastbourne Street

15

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

28–31

Eastbourne Street

19

Queen Street

29–31

Eastbourne Street

19A

Queen Street

30–31

Eastbourne Street

223

Ravensbourne Road

31–31

Eastbourne Street

87

Riselaw Road

32–31

Eastbourne Street

89

Riselaw Road

33–31

Eastbourne Street

89a

Riselaw Road

34–31

Eastbourne Street

91

Riselaw Road

35–31

Eastbourne Street

91a

Riselaw Road

36–31

Eastbourne Street

93

Riselaw Road

37–31

Eastbourne Street

93a

Riselaw Road

38–31

Eastbourne Street

21

Rosebery Street

39–31

Eastbourne Street

16

Selkirk Street

40–31

Eastbourne Street

11

Shand Street, Green Island

41–31

Eastbourne Street

14

Sheen Street

42–31

Eastbourne Street

6

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

43–31

Eastbourne Street

8

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

46–31

Eastbourne Street

10

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

47–31

Eastbourne Street

12

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

50–31

Eastbourne Street

14

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

51–31

Eastbourne Street

16

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

8

Echovale Avenue

20

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

10

Echovale Avenue

22

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

12

Echovale Avenue

24

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

2

Elbe Street

26

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

202

Elgin Road

28

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

204

Elgin Road

1-27

St Albans Street

206

Elgin Road

2-27

St Albans Street

208

Elgin Road

3-27

St Albans Street

1

Eton Drive

4-27

St Albans Street

4

Eton Drive

5-27

St Albans Street

5

Eton Drive

6-27

St Albans Street

6

Eton Drive

7-27

St Albans Street

7

Eton Drive

8-27

St Albans Street

8

Eton Drive

9-27

St Albans Street

9

Eton Drive

10-27

St Albans Street

10

Eton Drive

11-27

St Albans Street

11

Eton Drive

12-27

St Albans Street

12

Eton Drive

13-27

St Albans Street

13

Eton Drive

4

Stanley Square

14

Eton Drive

5

Stanley Square

15

Eton Drive

6

Stanley Square

16

Eton Drive

7

Stanley Square

17

Eton Drive

8

Stanley Square

18

Eton Drive

9

Stanley Square

19

Eton Drive

10

Stanley Square

20

Eton Drive

11

Stanley Square

2

Everton Road

12

Stanley Square

3

Everton Road

365

Stuart Street

4

Everton Road

367

Stuart Street

64

Every Street

367a

Stuart Street

66

Every Street

55

Sunbury Street

68

Every Street

57

Sunbury Street

70

Every Street

59

Sunbury Street

76

Every Street

59a

Sunbury Street

7

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

67

Tahuna Road

9

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

67A

Tahuna Road

11

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

67B

Tahuna Road

13

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69

Tahuna Road

15

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69A

Tahuna Road

17

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69B

Tahuna Road

19

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69C

Tahuna Road

21

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

1

Taupo Lane

19

Ferntree Drive

2

Taupo Street

21

Ferntree Drive

1

Thomas Square

23

Ferntree Drive

2

Thomas Square

25

Ferntree Drive

3

Thomas Square

45

Forfar Street

4

Thomas Square

47

Forfar Street

5

Thomas Square

47a

Forfar Street

6

Thomas Square

49

Forfar Street

7

Thomas Square

51

Forfar Street

8

Thomas Square

53

Forfar Street

9

Thomas Square

53a

Forfar Street

4A

Totara Street, Ravensbourne

1–80

Formby Street

44

Turnbull Street

5–80

Formby Street

46

Turnbull Street

6–80

Formby Street

85A

Victoria Road

7–80

Formby Street

85B

Victoria Road

8–80

Formby Street

85C

Victoria Road

10–80

Formby Street

85D

Victoria Road

14–80

Formby Street

85G

Victoria Road

15–80

Formby Street

85H

Victoria Road

16–80

Formby Street

85I

Victoria Road

17–80

Formby Street

85J

Victoria Road

18–80

Formby Street

85K

Victoria Road

19–80

Formby Street

85L

Victoria Road

20–80

Formby Street

85M

Victoria Road

248

George Street

85N

Victoria Road

558

George Street

85O

Victoria Road

150A

Gladstone Road North

85P

Victoria Road

150B

Gladstone Road North

85Q

Victoria Road

150C

Gladstone Road North

85R

Victoria Road

150D

Gladstone Road North

146

Victoria Road

150E

Gladstone Road North

44

Waimea Avenue

152B

Gladstone Road North

46

Waimea Avenue

152C

Gladstone Road North

48

Waimea Avenue

152D

Gladstone Road North

50

Waimea Avenue

152E

Gladstone Road North

58/60

Waimea Avenue

154A

Gladstone Road North

62/64

Waimea Avenue

214

Gladstone Road North

16

Warwick Street

216

Gladstone Road North

18

Warwick Street

218

Gladstone Road North

23

Warwick Street

220

Gladstone Road North

1

Wenlock Square

222

Gladstone Road North

2

Wenlock Square

224

Gladstone Road North

3

Wenlock Square

226

Gladstone Road North

4

Wenlock Square

228

Gladstone Road North

5

Wenlock Square

230

Gladstone Road North

6

Wenlock Square

232

Gladstone Road North

7

Wenlock Square

234

Gladstone Road North

8

Wenlock Square

39

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

9

Wenlock Square

41

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

10

Wenlock Square

45

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

11

Wenlock Square

47

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

12

Wenlock Square

49

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

14

Wenlock Square

57

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

15

Wenlock Square

1

Glenfinnan Place

17

Wenlock Square

3

Glenfinnan Place

18

Wenlock Square

4

Glenfinnan Place

19

Wenlock Square

4A

Glenfinnan Place

20

Wenlock Square

5

Glenfinnan Place

21

Wenlock Square

6

Glenfinnan Place

33

Wickliffe Street

7

Glenfinnan Place

19

Woodside Terrace

8A

Glenfinnan Place

20

Woodside Terrace

8B

Glenfinnan Place

22

Woodside Terrace

9A

Glenfinnan Place

23

Woodside Terrace

9B

Glenfinnan Place

24

Woodside Terrace

10A

Glenfinnan Place

25

Woodside Terrace

10B

Glenfinnan Place

25a

Woodside Terrace

1

Glengarry Court

26

Woodside Terrace

2

Glengarry Court

27

Woodside Terrace

3

Glengarry Court

29

Woodside Terrace

4

Glengarry Court

 

 

5

Glengarry Court

 

 

6

Glengarry Court

 

 

7

Glengarry Court

 

 

8

Glengarry Court

 

 

Differential Matters and Categories

b)     Adopt the following differential categories for the 2018/19 financial year.

The differential categories are determined in accordance with the Council's land use codes.  The Council's land use codes are based on the land use codes set under the Rating Valuation Rules 2008 and are set out in Attachment A.  In addition, the Council has established categories for residential institutions, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, the Forsyth Barr Stadium, churches, and schools.

1      Differentials Based on Land Use

The Council uses this matter to:

·           Differentiate the General rate.

·           Differentiate the Community Services rate.

·           Differentiate the Kerbside Recycling rate.

·           Differentiate the Private Street Lighting rate.

·           Differentiate the Tourism/Economic Development rate.

·           Differentiate the Fire Protection rate.

The differential categories based on land use are:

·           Residential – includes all rating units used for residential purposes including single residential, multi-unit residential, multi-use residential, residential special accommodation, residential communal residence dependant on other use, residential bach/cribs, residential carparking and residential vacant land.

·           Lifestyle – includes all rating units with Council's land use codes 2, 20, 21, 22 and 29.

·           Commercial – includes all rating units with land uses not otherwise categorised as Residential, Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts, Lifestyle, Farmland or Forsyth Barr Stadium.

·           Farmland - includes all rating units used solely or principally for agricultural or horticultural or pastoral purposes.

·           Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts – includes all rating units meeting the following description:

·        Bed and breakfast establishments; and

·        Classified as commercial for rating purposes due to the number of bedrooms (greater than four); and

·        Either:

·       the majority of the establishment is at least 80 years old, or

·       the establishment has Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Registration, or

·       the establishment is a Dunedin City Council Protected Heritage Building as identified in the District Plan; and

·        The bed and breakfast owner lives at the facility.

·           Forsyth Barr Stadium – this includes land at 130 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin, Assessment 4026695, Valuation reference 27190-01403.

2      Differentials Based on Land Use and Provision or Availability of Service

The Council uses these matters to differentiate the drainage rate and the commercial drainage rate.

The differential categories based on land use are:

·           Residential – includes all rating units used for residential purposes including single residential, multi-unit residential, multi-use residential, residential special accommodation, residential communal residence dependant on other use, residential bach/cribs, residential carparking and residential vacant land.

·           Lifestyle - includes all rating units with Council's land use codes 2, 20, 21, 22 and 29.

·           Farmland - includes all rating units used solely or principally for agricultural or horticultural or pastoral purposes.

·           Commercial – includes all rating units with land uses not otherwise categorised as Residential, Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts, Lifestyle, Farmland, Residential Institutions, Forsyth Barr Stadium, Churches or Schools.

·           Forsyth Barr Stadium – this includes land at 130 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin, Assessment 4026695, Valuation reference 27190-01403.

·           Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts – includes all rating units meeting the following description:

·        Bed and breakfast establishments; and

·        Classified as commercial for rating purposes due to the number of bedrooms (greater than four); and

·        Either:

·       the majority of the establishment is at least 80 years old or

·       the establishment has Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Registration or

·       the establishment is a Dunedin City Council Protected Heritage Building as identified in the District Plan; and

·        The bed and breakfast owner lives at the facility.

·           Residential Institutions - includes only rating units with the Council's land use codes 95 and 96.

·           Churches – includes all rating units used for places of religious worship.

·           Schools - includes only rating units used for schools that do not operate for profit.

The differential categories based on provision or availability of service are:

·           Connected – any rating unit that is connected to a public sewerage drain.

·           Serviceable – any rating unit that is not connected to a public sewerage drain but is capable of being connected to the sewerage system (being a property situated within 30 metres of a public drain).

3      Differentials Based on Provision or Availability of Service

The Council uses this matter to differentiate the water rates.

The differential categories based on provision or availability of service are:

·           Connected – any rating unit that is supplied by the water supply system.

·           Serviceable – any rating unit that is not supplied but is capable of being supplied by the water supply system (being a rating unit situated within 100 metres of the nearest water supply).

Minimum Rates

c)     Approves that where the total amount of rates payable in respect of any rating unit is less than $5.00 including GST, the rates payable in respect of the rating unit shall be such amount as the Council determines but not exceeding $5.00 including GST.

Low Value Rating Units

d)     Approves that rating units with a capital value of $3,500 or less will only be charged the general rate.

Land Use Codes

e)     Approves that the land use codes attached to this report are adopted as the Council's land use codes for the purpose of the rating method.

Separately Used or Inhabited Part of a Rating Unit

f)     Adopts the following definition of a separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit:

"A separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit includes any portion inhabited or used by the owner/a person other than the owner, and who has the right to use or inhabit that portion by virtue of a tenancy, lease, licence, or other agreement.

This definition includes separately used parts, whether or not actually occupied at any particular time, which are provided by the owner for rental (or other form of occupation) on an occasional or long term basis by someone other than the owner.

For the purpose of this definition, vacant land and vacant premises offered or intended for use or habitation by a person other than the owner and usually used as such are defined as 'used'.

For the avoidance of doubt, a rating unit that has a single use or occupation is treated as having one separately used or inhabited part."

Lump Sum Contributions

g)     Approves that no lump sum contributions will be sought for any targeted rate.

Rating by Instalments

h)     Approves the following schedule of rates to be collected by the Council, payable by four instalments.

The City is divided into four areas based on Valuation Roll Numbers, as set out below:

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 3 continued

Valuation Roll Numbers:

26700

26990

26500

27550

26710

27000

26520

27560

26760

27050

26530

27600

26770

27060

26541

27610

26850

27070

26550

27760

26860

27080

26580

27770

26950

27150

26590

27780

26960

27350

26620

27790

26970

27360

26640

27811

26980

27370

26651

27821

27160

27380

26750

27822

27170

27500

26780

27823

27180

27510

27250

27831

27190

27520

27260

27841

27200

27851

27270

27871

 

27861

27280

27911

 

27880

27450

27921

 

27890

27460

27931

 

27901

27470

27941

 

28000

 

 

 

28010

 

 

 

28020

 

 

Area 4 comprises ratepayers with multiple assessments who pay on a schedule.

Due Dates for Payment of Rates

i)      Approves the due dates for all rates with the exception of water rates, which are charged based on water meter consumption, will be payable in four instalments due on the dates below:

 

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 4

Instalment 1

24/08/18

31/08/18

14/09/18

31/08/18

Instalment 2

16/11/18

30/11/18

14/12/18

30/11/18

Instalment 3

08/02/19

22/02/19

08/03/19

22/02/19

Instalment 4

03/05/19

17/05/19

31/05/19

17/05/19

Water meter invoices are sent separately from other rates at intervals depending on the quantity of water consumed.

Penalties

j)     Resolves to charge the following penalties on unpaid rates:

1      A charge of 10% of the unpaid rates instalment will be added to the amount of any instalment remaining unpaid the day after the instalment due date set out above.

2      Where a ratepayer has not paid the first instalment by the due date of that instalment, and has paid the total rates and charges in respect of the rating unit for the 2018/19 rating year by the due date of the second instalment the 10% additional charge for the first instalment shall be remitted.

3      For amounts levied in any previous financial year and which remain unpaid on 1 October 2018, 10% of that sum shall be charged, including additional charges (in any).

4      For amounts levied in any previous financial year and which remain unpaid on 1 April 2019, 10% of that sum shall be charged, including additional charges (if any).

Assessing and Recovering Rates

k)     Approves that the Chief Executive Officer, General Manager Finance and Commercial, Financial Controller and Rates and Revenue Team Leader be authorised to take all necessary steps to assess and recover the above rates.

BACKGROUND

2      The rating method for the 2018/19 year formed part of the supporting documentation made available during the community engagement period of the draft 10 year plan 2018-28.

DISCUSSION

3      The rating method for the 2018/19 year incorporates the following changes:

·       An increase in the community services targeted rate of 1.5%.

·       An increase in the Forsyth Barr Stadium differential rates of 1.5%.

Community Services Targeted Rate

4      In the 2015/16 year, the Council agreed that the community services targeted rate should be increased annually by the Local Government Cost Index (LGCI).  An allowance for the June 2017 LGCI of 1.5% increases this from $230.00 to $233.50 for the 2018/19 year. 

Forsyth Barr Stadium Differentiated Rates

5      In the 2013/14 year, the differentiated Forsyth Barr Stadium rates have been inflation adjusted annually.  For the 2018/19 year, these rates are increased by the June 2017 LGCI of 1.5%.

Limit on "Fixed" Charging

6      Section 21 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 includes a limit on certain rates.  In any one year, the Council may not collect more than 30% of its total rates revenue by way of:

·           Any uniform annual general charge.

·           Any targeted rate that is calculated as a fixed amount per rating unit or separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (and which is not used solely for water supply or sewage disposal).

7      The Council does not use a uniform annual general charge.  The relevant targeted rates for the 2018/19 year are the kerbside recycling rate, the community services rate and the drainage fixed charge.  These rates equate to 25% of total rates revenue.  

OPTIONS

8      The option provided is to set rates in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 in order to provide rates funding in the 2018/19 year in accordance with the 2018/19 budget.

NEXT STEPS

9      The Council can now set and assess the rates described in its Funding Impact Statement.

Signatories

Author:

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Financial Controller

Dave Tombs - General Manager Finance and Commercial

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Dunedin City Council Land Use Codes

56

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables the Council to collect the necessary rates funding in order to provide local infrastructure, public services and regulatory functions for the community.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

This decision fits with the strategic framework because it provides the necessary rates funding to implement the activities outlined in the 2018/19 budget.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The Council has adopted the 10 year plan 2018-28 and can now set and assess the rates described in its Funding Impact Statement.

Financial considerations

The Council has adopted the 10 year plan 2018-28 and can now set and assess the rates described in its Funding Impact Statement, for the 2018/19 year.

Significance

The decision sets the rates for the 2018/19 year as outlined in the 10 year plan 2018-28.

Engagement – external

The proposed rating method formed part of the Supporting Documentation for the 10 year plan 2018-28 consultation.

Engagement - internal

Internal engagement has occurred with staff in the relevant departments.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Legal risks were considered and appropriate advice sought.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no known implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

 

Dunedin City Council Land Use Codes

Land Use Code

Land Use Description

Differential Category

0

Multi-use: Vacant/Indeterminate

Commercial

1

Multi-use: Rural Industry

Farmland

2

Multi-use: Lifestyle

Lifestyle

3

Multi-use: Transport

Commercial

4

Multi-use: Community Services

Commercial

5

Multi-use: Recreational

Commercial

6

Multi-use: Utility Services

Commercial

7

Multi-use: Industrial

Commercial

8

Multi-use: Commercial

Commercial

9

Multi-use: Residential

Residential

10

Rural: Multi-use within Rural Industry

Farmland

11

Rural: Dairy

Farmland

12

Rural: Stock Finishing

Farmland

13

Rural: Arable Farming

Farmland

14

Rural: Store Livestock

Farmland

15

Rural: Market Gardens and Orchards

Farmland

16

Rural: Specialist Livestock

Farmland

17

Rural: Forestry

Farmland

18

Rural: Mineral Extraction

Commercial

19

Rural: Vacant

Farmland

20

Lifestyle: Multi-use within Lifestyle

Lifestyle

21

Lifestyle: Single Unit

Lifestyle

22

Lifestyle: Multi Unit

Lifestyle

29

Lifestyle: Vacant

Lifestyle

30

Transport: Multi-use within Transport

Commercial

31

Transport: Road Transport

Commercial

32

Transport: Parking

Commercial

33

Transport: Rail Transport

Commercial

34

Transport: Water Transport

Commercial

35

Transport: Air Transport

Commercial

39

Transport: Vacant

Commercial

40

Community Services: Multi-use within Community Services

Commercial

41

Community Services: Educational

Commercial

42

Community Services: Medical and Allied

Commercial

43

Community Services: Personal and Property Protection

Commercial

44

Community Services: Religious

Commercial

45

Community Services: Defence

Commercial

46

Community Services: Halls

Commercial

47

Community Services: Cemeteries and Crematoria

Commercial

49

Community Services: Vacant

Commercial

50

Recreational: Multi-use within Recreational

Commercial

51

Recreational: Entertainment

Commercial

52

Recreational: Active Indoor

Commercial

53

Recreational: Active Outdoor

Commercial

54

Recreational: Passive Indoor

Commercial

55

Recreational: Passive Outdoor

Commercial

59

Recreational: Vacant

Commercial

60

Utility Services: Multi-use within Utility Services

Commercial

61

Utility Services: Communications

Commercial

62

Utility Services: Electricity

Commercial

63

Utility Services: Gas

Commercial

64

Utility Services: Water Supply

Commercial

65

Utility Services: Sanitary

Commercial

66

Utility Services: Other

Commercial

67

Utility Services: Post Boxes

Commercial

69

Utility Services: Vacant

Commercial

70

Industrial: Multi-use within Industrial

Commercial

71

Industrial: Food, Drink and Tobacco

Commercial

72

Industrial: Textiles, Leather and Fur

Commercial

73

Industrial: Timber Products and Furniture

Commercial

74

Industrial: Building Materials Other than Timber

Commercial

75

Industrial: Engineering, Metalworking, Appliances and Machinery

Commercial

76

Industrial: Chemicals, Plastics, Rubber and Paper

Commercial

77

Industrial: Other Industriesincluding Storage

Commercial

78

Industrial: Depots, Yards

Commercial

79

Industrial: Vacant

Commercial

80

Commercial: Multi-use within Commercial

Commercial

81

Commercial: Retail

Commercial

82

Commercial: Services

Commercial

83

Commercial: Wholesale

Commercial

84

Commercial: Offices

Commercial

85

Commercial: Carparking

Commercial

89

Commercial: Vacant

Commercial

90

Residential: Multi-use within Residential

Residential

91

Residential: Single Unit excluding Bach

Residential

92

Residential: Multi Unit

Residential

93

Residential: Public CommunalUnlicensed

Commercial

94

Residential: Public CommunalLicensed

Commercial

95

Residential: Special Accommodation

Residential

96

Residential: Communal Residence Dependent on Other Use

Residential

97

Residential: Bach

Residential

98

Residential: Carparking

Residential

99

Residential: Vacant

Residential

 

 


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

 

Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy Review 2018

Department: Corporate Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      In December 2017, the Council adopted a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy which permitted all shops in Dunedin the option of trading on Easter Sunday. The Council resolved to start a review of the policy 90 days after Easter Sunday.

2      This report presents initial feedback about Easter Sunday shop trading in 2018 and recommends a Statement of Proposal be adopted as part of the special consultative procedure which must be followed under the Local Government Act (LGA).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy Statement of Proposal.

b)     Reappoints the members of the Hearings Committee as follows:

i)      Councillor Andrew Whiley (Chair)

ii)     Councillor Marie Laufiso

iii)    Councillor Kate Wilson

iv)    Councillor Damian Newell.

 

 

BACKGROUND

3      The 2016 Amendment to the Shop Trading Hours Act 1990 (the Act) allows territorial authorities to create a local policy to allow Easter Sunday shop trading in its area.  If adopted, an Easter Sunday shop trading policy means that opening to trade is permitted.

4      Without a policy, current restrictions apply i.e. on Easter Sunday only pharmacies, restaurants, souvenir shops and garden centres are able to trade.  Licensed premises (including restaurants) are also able to trade, however they are subject to restrictions imposed by the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act, limiting the sale of alcohol to people present on the premises for dining.

5      Local policies must comply with shop trading provisions in other legislation, such as opening hours or determining what types of shops may open.  Restrictions already in place pursuant to the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 are not affected by such a policy.

6      The Act acknowledges that Easter Sunday continues to be a day of significance across New Zealand and some people would prefer not work on this day.  Shop employees can refuse to work on Easter Sunday and employers must not compel or treat shop employees adversely if they refuse.

7      Likewise, an Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy does not compel businesses to open on Easter Sunday; however it gives them the option to trade should they wish to do so.

8      Mandatory opening provisions in shop leases may not be interpreted as requiring a shop to trade on Easter Sunday (unless it is the type of lease for which there is a specified exception in the Act).

9      If adopted, a Local Easter Sunday shop trading policy must be reviewed within five years. The special consultative procedure must be used to decide whether to:

a)     Amend the policy

b)     Revoke the policy

c)     Replace the policy or

d)     Continue the policy without amendment.

10    After this first review, no further reviews are required by legislation. Further reviews may be made at any time and the Council may wish to specify a review period.

11    In August 2017, following a request from the Otago Chamber of Commerce to consider the introduction of a policy in Dunedin, the Council resolved to approve a draft Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy for consultation.

12    In December 2017, the Council resolved that it:

Adopts a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy with the date of effect 1 January 2018 so that any type of shop may trade on Easter Sunday.

i)      Decides to schedule a review of the Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy to begin 90 days after Tuesday 3 April 2018.

ii)     Writes to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment requesting that advertising is undertaken to increase awareness of employers' statutory obligations for offering employees work on Easter Sunday.

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr Doug Hall).

DISCUSSION

Initial stakeholder feedback

13    In December, the Hearings Committee specified that the 2018 review canvas views of employees, employers, those who submitted in 2017 and the wider public. Following Easter Sunday 2018, there has been initial engagement with these key stakeholder groups to find out how Easter Sunday shop trading affected them. This pre-consultation is intended to inform Councillors of the impact of the policy and key issues before the special consultative procedure is used to formally review the policy.

14    Questionnaires were developed for each of the stakeholder groups: retailers, employees and the public to find out how the policy affected them on Easter Sunday 2018. Key stakeholders were contacted and asked to forward information and links through their networks. These organisations were the Otago Chamber of Commerce, the Otago Southland Employers Association, First Union, Unite and Knox Church.

15    Information and the links were made available from 30 April until 18 May. They were promoted through social media, FYI and on the DCC website. The Dunedin People’s Panel was also surveyed for feedback. Online submitters who had made submissions in September 2017 were contacted and invited to complete relevant questions.

16    See Attachment A for the full summary of feedback from stakeholders.

Retailers

17    This table summarises the feedback from retailers.

Table 1: Retailers’ summary of feedback

 

Yes

No

Unsure

Support continuation of policy

53%

40%

6%

Chose to open Easter Sunday

61%

39%

N/A

Of those opening, business benefited economically

69%

29%

3%

Of those opening, had difficulty staffing

18%

82%

N/A

Of those opening, offered a day in lieu or time and a half to staff

59%

41%

N/A

Of all respondents, will consider opening in 2019 if policy

44%

50%

8%

 

18    Issues raised by retailers in order of frequency were: retailers, employees and shoppers should have the choice of opening, working and shopping on Easter Sunday; trading should be a one-off for the Ed Sheeran concerts or other major events only; and that it impacted on family time.


 

Employees

19    This table summarises feedback from employees.

Table 2: Employees’ summary of feedback

 

Yes

No

Unsure

Support continuation of policy

26%

67%

7%

Were asked to work

60%

40%

N/A

If asked, chose to work

61%

39%

N/A

If worked, appreciated opportunity to work

32%

57%

10%

If worked, felt pressured to work if did not want to

50%

44%

6%

If worked, offered time in lieu or a day and a half

57%

40%

3%

Of all respondents, would appreciate opportunity to work in future

25%

68%

7%

 

20    Issues raised by employees in order of frequency were: it is important to protect this non trading day as it is one of 3.5 guaranteed holidays for employees; that the day is important for family, friends, health and community; that the policy should be a one-off for major events; that benefits such as time and a half and a day in lieu should be offered; that the policy should be retained to give retailers and shoppers the choice; and that they felt pressured, obligated or expected to work when they did not want to.

Public

21    This table summarises feedback from the public.

Table 3: Public summary of feedback

 

Yes

No

Unsure

Support continuation of policy

46%

45%

9%

Shopped on Easter Sunday

35%

65%

N/A

Appreciated opportunity to shop Easter Sunday

45%

45%

10%

 

22    Issues raised by the public in order of frequency were: it is important to retain the non-trading day for family, friends, health and rest; protect the day and workers’ rights; retain the policy to allow retailers and shoppers the choice to open or shop; policy is great for tourism, economy and Dunedin’s future; there is no need to shop on this day; concern for workers being pressured to work; should be a one-off for major events; the day is outdated with little significance; other countries protect their workers’ rights and holidays better; and the day should be acknowledged for its religious significance.


 

People’s Panel

23    The Dunedin People’s Panel aims to provide an opportunity for people in Dunedin to get involved with a range of Dunedin City Council issues, giving feedback by completing online surveys. The Panel ideally supplements other research, using consultation to provide public perceptions to help inform decision-making processes. Panellists are recruited to be ‘typical’ members of the public – that is they come from a range of backgrounds and have a range of involvement with the DCC. The People’s Panel is not a statistically representative sample of the Dunedin population because panellists choose to sign up although representation from a variety of groups is encouraged. The People’s Panel was invited to answer questions about Easter Sunday shop trading.

24    This table summarises feedback from the People’s Panel.

Table 4: People’s Panel summary of feedback

 

Yes

No

Unsure

Support continuation of policy

55%

38%

7%

Shopped on Easter Sunday

20%

80%

N/A

Appreciated opportunity to shop Easter Sunday

45%

44%

11%

 

25    Issues raised by People’s Panellists in order of frequency were: there is no need to shop on this day; concern for workers’ rights; it is an important day for family, recreation and rest; shops should have the choice to trade; the day no longer has religious significance; concern that workers will be pressured to work; should be for special events only; it was good and convenient to be able to shop; should acknowledge the religious significance of the day; and staff who work should get extra benefits.

Social media

26    Posts on social media prompted various discussions with key topics concern for workers’ rights, the day should be a guaranteed day off for holiday and family time, and that it was great for shopping.

Other Councils

27    At 30 May 2018, 41 councils in New Zealand have Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policies. Of these, 39 are district councils and two are city councils (Tauranga and Dunedin).

Further consultation

28    The special consultative procedure is required to review the policy and a Statement of Proposal is required as part of this process. The Statement of Proposal outlines the options of continuing the policy and of not continuing the policy and provides advantages and disadvantages for each option. It seeks specific feedback on both options – see Attachment B.

Hearings Committee

29    A Hearings Committee is required to hear feedback and deliberate on submissions. It is proposed that the Committee that heard submissions in 2017 is reappointed, given their previous involvement with this policy. Members of that Hearings Committee were:

·      Councillor Andrew Whiley (Chair)

·      Councillor Marie Laufiso

·      Councillor Kate Wilson and

·      Councillor Damian Newell.

OPTIONS

30    There are no options associated with this report as, in December 2017, the Council resolved to review the policy.

NEXT STEPS

31    If the draft Statement of Proposal is approved for consultation, the following timeline for this review is proposed:

26 June 2018

Council approves draft Statement of Proposal for consultation.

2 July – 3 August 2018

Special consultative procedure.

August

Summarise feedback and prepare report for Hearings Committee.

September

Hearings and Deliberations.

27 November 2018

Hearings Committee report to Council with recommendations.

Council decides to continue or revoke the policy.

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Anne Gray - Policy Analyst

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Summary of feedback on Easter Sunday shop trading 2018

67

b

Statement of Proposal for Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy review 2018

79

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision/report/proposal relates to providing a regulatory function and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Easter Sunday shop trading both contributes to and detracts from the standard of living and vibrant and cohesive communities priorities of the Social Wellbeing Strategy. It contributes to the business vitality and compelling destination priorities of the Economic Development Strategy.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no specific implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.

Significance

The significance of a decision relating to a Local Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy is considered medium – high in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy with regard to community interest and involvement.

Engagement – external

Pre-consultation for the 2018 policy review has involved engagement with stakeholder groups and the public as outlined in the Discussion section of the report.

Engagement - internal

Input to this report was provided by Customer & Regulatory Services, Corporate Policy and in-house legal counsel.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no identified conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no specific implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

26 June 2018

 

 

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Council

26 June 2018

 

 

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Council

26 June 2018

 

 

 

Waste Futures 2023 Project

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  

1      The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the establishment of the Waste Futures 2023 project, and to describe the project execution plan for completion of phase one of the project.

2      This report provides a high level overview of the Waste Futures 2023 project.

3      The report details a high level plan and outlines the next phases in the project and the reporting mechanisms to inform councillors. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Waste Futures 2023 Project report.

 

BACKGROUND

4      Dunedin City Council is at an important decision point for shaping the future of solid waste management in the Dunedin region. The resource consents from the Otago Regional Council for Green Island Landfill expire in October 2023. Council has a designated alternative site available; however, the original Environmental Impact Assessment of that site was completed in October 1992 and is therefore 26 years old. Current advice is that the consent, procurement and establishment process for a new Class 1 landfill could take approximately seven to eight years.

5      Several studies to investigate development arrangements and governance options for solid waste have been carried out over the last 14 years. These options have included Council Controlled Organisations, Council Controlled Trading Organisations, Private Public Partnerships, or exiting the landfill market. This work has been carried out by staff assisted by external consultants and culminated in an EOI process in 2014 and subsequent RFP ‘Contract 5471 Partnering arrangement for Solid Waste Disposal’ which concluded unsuccessfully in 2016.

6      Following the 2016 RFP process for Contract 5471 staff moved forward with the tender process for three operational contracts ‘Contract 6865 Green Island Landfill and Transfer Station Management; Contract 6863 Landfill Environmental Monitoring and Reporting; Contract 7642 Rural Skip Days and Transfer Stations Operation’ in time for commencement on 1 July 2017.

7      Due to the resource consents for Green Island Landfill expiring in October 2023 there is a need to confirm the preferred future waste operating model, including preferred option for landfill operation, as soon as possible.

DISCUSSION

8      Solid waste management and landfill operations are a key strategic priority for the Council and have high community and stakeholder interest.

9      There is no mandatory or legal requirement for local authorities to be directly involved in the provision of landfill services or the collection of waste.  However a territorial authority must promote effective and efficient waste management and minimisation within its district in accordance with section 42 of the Waste Minimisation Act 2008.

10    How waste is managed should reflect the direction of the Council’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP).  Council’s WMMP is due for review by September 2019 and will need to be developed alongside the Waste Futures Project to cover collection, waste minimisation, resource recovery, recycling, treatment and disposal, services and facilities in the Dunedin region.

11    Council must also comply with the New Zealand Waste Strategy 2010 and the following legislation:

·           Waste Minimisation Act (2008)

·           Local Government Act (2002)

·           Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act (1996)

·           Climate Change Response Act (2002)

·           Resource Management Act (1991)

·           Litter Act (1979).

12    The Council has set an aspirational zero-waste target through the WMMP 2013 and recent Council resolutions have directed investigation of enhanced waste management practice including organics collection.  Decisions on these will need to be considered as part of the WMMP review and the wider future waste operating model.

13    The operating context for waste, including waste levies and legislative requirements, is shifting with the new Government towards higher standards, meaning that Council needs to be planning for this new operating environment and ensuring that this is sustainable long term.

14    Waste recovery is challenging due to limited markets for recovered waste (e.g., glass/plastics) and competing financial incentives to dispose of waste (e.g., green waste), meaning it will be challenging to achieve the Council’s waste management aspirations of zero-waste.

15    The Green Island Landfill plays an important role in waste management. The landfill forms part of a wider interdependent system managed by both the Council and private sector that also includes collection contracts, transfer stations, landfill operations, public engagement, and waste recovery activities. 

16    Resource consents for the operation of the Green Island Landfill expire in 2023. Current advice is that it may be challenging to extend the consents or the physical scale of the landfill significantly beyond 2023, meaning alternative sites and delivery models need to be investigated along with the feasibility of extending the Green Island consents (both scale of the site and time-frame) and the enhancement of current waste minimisation practices.

17    Any extension of the Green Island Landfill consent would only be for a short period. 

18    Examples from other Councils indicate that it is likely that development of an alternative landfill disposal site to replace Green Island Landfill would take around seven years to plan, consent, and implement.  This includes significant RMA consenting process and stakeholder engagement.  Therefore it is unlikely a new disposal site would be delivered before the expiry of current landfill consents in 2023. Examples of Councils or regions that have recently worked through a similar process include:

·           Napier/Hastings;

·           Taranaki;

·           Ruapehu;

·           Queenstown; and

·           Christchurch.

19    Council’s waste collection contracts also require review by 2019 and these will need to be linked to future landfill options. Extensions to the existing contracts or interim contracts will need to be put in place until a preferred future solid waste operating model has been identified and approved for detailed investigation in 2019/20.

20    The combination of these factors presents a unique opportunity for Council to develop its preferred future strategic waste management model for the Dunedin region over the medium to long term.

OPTIONS

21    Not applicable.

waste futures 2023 project

22    The Project Execution Plan for the first part of the project has been developed, and a Project Steering Group has been established consisting of the acting General Manager Infrastructure and Networks, General Manager Strategy and Governance, and General Manager Finance and Commercial. The Project Control Group has also been established, and meeting and reporting structures have been implemented.

23    Overall project governance sits with the Council’s Infrastructure and Network Services Committee and there will be regular reports to the Committee on progress.

24    Phase one of the project will consist of six concurrent and closely interrelated workstreams:

·           Workstream 1: Project Management – Ongoing project management and governance of the programme, including procurement of professional services.

·           Workstream 2: Feasibility Analysis – Technical feasibility analysis of Green Island and alternative landfill site at Smooth Hill (see map attachment A), including service continuity and planning.

·           Workstream 3: Options Analysis and Business Case Process – Development and analysis of waste futures options, including recommendation of preferred option and associated business case development.

·           Workstream 4: Review of Waste Management and Minimisation Plan – Review of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan to ensure it is aligned with, and supports, Waste Futures 2023.

·           Workstream 5: Review Kerbside Collection – Review collection contracts to ensure they support service continuity and are aligned with, and support, Waste Futures 2023.

·           Workstream 6: Communications and Engagement – Development and implementation of a communications and engagement strategy and plan that supports Waste Futures 2023, including the review of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and review of kerbside collection services.

25    Phase one of the project is intended to be an integrated assessment of all aspects of the waste management system that are relevant to Dunedin. The project will review the strategic options available to manage solid waste and will employ the Better Business Case framework in accordance with the New Zealand Government’s Better Business Case guidelines.

26    This process provides a best practice approach to manage risk and ensure a robust assessment of options and the financial, delivery, management and environmental issues associated with this type of project.  It also ensures that the Council is well placed to seek Government investment for the project through the Provincial Growth Fund, if this is considered a viable funding source to support delivery.

27    The business case will be developed in stages, with the first stage leading to an indicative business case aimed at advising the Council of a preferred option, followed by a detailed business case aimed at a final decision on what components should comprise the entire solid waste management system operated by Council.

28    Council will require the assistance of suitably qualified professionals to assist with the development of this business case, either in whole or in part. The deliverables for the project reflect the Better Business Case framework and will be developed over the life of the project.

29    Early engagement with key stakeholders is being undertaken via targeted consultation meetings as part of the early project establishment phase. Stakeholders with a high level of interest in the project include the community, Councillors, Otago Regional Council, waste collectors, waste processors, and various council departments. Other important stakeholders include iwi, government departments, waste generators, neighbouring councils, and users of recycled products.

30    Consultation and engagement with the public is expected to take the following forms:

·           Direct engagement with key/affected stakeholders;

·           Website information, leaflets, e-mails, drop-in sessions; and

·           A public consultation process in 2018.

NEXT STEPS

31    Early engagement with project stakeholders is currently underway, and contact with potentially affected parties has been initiated. The Communication and Engagement Plan, Procurement Plan, Project Schedule, and Risk Register have been developed and will be updated during the life of the project.

32    Procurement for suitably qualified and experienced resources to complete both the feasibility studies and Better Business Case assessment is currently underway. The target date for contract award is 9 July 2018.

33    Regular reporting on the project will be through INSCOM.

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Authoriser:

Leanne Mash - General Manager Infrastructure and Networks (Acting)

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Smooth Hill Photographic Map

95

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report relates to providing local infrastructure and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

This report relates to providing a public service and it is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy