Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Annual Plan Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                                    Monday 31 January 2022

Time:                                                   9.00 am

Venue:                                                Via Audio Visual Link

 

Sandy Graham

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council Annual Plan

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Aaron Hawkins

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Christine Garey

 

 

Members

Cr Sophie Barker

Cr David Benson-Pope

 

Cr Rachel Elder

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Carmen Houlahan

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Jim O'Malley

 

Cr Jules Radich

Cr Chris Staynes

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Steve Walker

 

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

 

Senior Officer                                               Sandy Graham, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer                  Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

Lynne Adamson

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Lynne.Adamson@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

The meeting will be streamed on the Council’s You Tube Page:

Monday - https://youtu.be/iR2cIwGbfqg; Tuesday - https://youtu.be/vZ4qI5uH2Q4 and

Wednesday - https://youtu.be/HU1kOGLYFM8

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Council Annual Plan

31 January 2022

 

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                                                                         PAGE

 

1             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                              4

2             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                    4

3             Confirmation of Agenda                                                                                                                                        4

4             Declaration of Interest                                                                                                                                           5      

Part A Reports (Annual Plan Hearings/Deliberations  has power to decide these matters)

5             CEO Overview Report - Annual Plan 2022/23                                                                                             18

6             Annual Plan Budget Update - Reserves and Recreational Facilities                                                    28

7             Options for a sports hub at Logan Park                                                                                                         40

8             Destination Playspaces Options Report                                                                                                        47

9             Proposal for the development of a covered winter cricket training facility                                     76

10           Annual Plan Budget Update - Waste Management                                                                                  83

11           Kerbside Collection - Update on pay as you throw technology                                                            91

12           Funding Options - Kerbside Collection Service                                                                                         101

13           Annual Plan Budget Update - Regulatory Services                                                                                  108

14           Annual Plan Budget Update - Property Services                                                                                      123

15           Proposed New DCC Community Housing Policy 2022                                                                           130

16           Sims Building                                                                                                                                                         151

17           Annual Plan Budget Update - 3 Waters                                                                                                      158

18           Annual Plan Budget Update - Roading and Footpaths                                                                          165

19           Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme                                                                                                       171

20           Annual Plan Budget Update - Galleries, Libraries and Museums                                                       187

21           Annual Plan Budget Update - Community and Planning                                                                      194

22           Additional Support for Task Force Green                                                                                                   202

23           Annual Plan Budget Update - Economic Development                                                                         208

24           2022-23 Rating Method                                                                                                                                    214

25           Assistance to Ratepayers on Limited or Fixed Incomes                                                                        223

26           Proposed Event Road Closures for February 2022                                                                                  236            

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                                                                     246

 

 


 

1          Public Forum

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

2          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

3          Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.         Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

2.         Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

1.          

3.         Staff members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable.

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

c)     Notes the Executive Leadership Team Members’ Interests.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Councillor Register of Interest

6

b

ELT Register of Interest

16

  


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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31 January 2022

 

Part A Reports

 

CEO Overview Report - Annual Plan 2022/23

Department: Executive Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the budgets to be included in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan (“the draft Plan”).  The draft Plan for 2022/23 is an update of year two of the 10 year plan 2021-31.

2          This report highlights the budget challenges the DCC faces with the uncertainty of COVID-19 and its impacts. While savings have been found across the board, this is largely offset by the inflationary pressures faced when procuring goods and services and operating the business. The budget approach has also needed to balance the costs associated with the planned work programme against the resources it takes to deliver this work.

3          At the completion of this work, the draft budgets propose a rate rise of 6.5% for 2022/23 which is lower than the 7.0% provided for in year two of the 10 year plan.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the DCC overall as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Notes that any resolution made in this meeting related to the 2022/23 Annual Plan reports may be subject to further discussions and decision by the meeting.

 

BACKGROUND

4          The Local Government Act 2002 (the Act) provides that Council must prepare and adopt an annual plan for each financial year.  Section 95 (5) sets out the purpose of an annual plan as follows:

The purpose of an annual plan is to –

(a)      Contain the proposed annual budget and funding impact statement for the year to which the annual plan relates; and

(b)      Identify any variation from the financial statements and funding impact statement included in the local authority’s long-term plan in respect of the year; and

(c)       Provide integrated decision making and co-ordination of the resources of the local authority; and

(d)      Contribute to the accountability of the local authority to the community.

5          The draft Plan for 2022/23 is an update of year two of the 10 year plan.  Budgets for the 2022/23 year have been reviewed and budget update reports for each activity of Council have been prepared for consideration at this meeting.  If Council chooses to do everything included in the draft budgets, the overall rate increase for the 2022/23 year will be 6.5%, compared to a 7.0% rate increase provided for in the 10 year plan.

DISCUSSION

6          This has been a challenging budget process with pressures from increasing inflation, a high level of growth and associated building activity in the city, increases in depreciation expense due to the revaluation of assets, and an extensive work programme that has incorporated a number of new initiatives introduced through the 10 year plan.

7          In developing the draft budgets, the approach taken has involved a review of all costs and included initial reviews of service delivery options in some areas.  Insourcing options have been examined with a view to achieving efficiencies and increasing organisational resilience. This includes beginning work to reduce the reliance on consultants while recognising that there will always be a need for specialist services. 

8          The budget incorporates a range of savings with additional savings still required to achieve a balanced budget.  Further savings in contracted services and consultancy are being worked through and the outcome reported in May 2022. 

9          While year 2 of the 10 year plan provided for a 7.0% rates increase and an inflation assumption ranging from 1.7% to 3.5%, the draft budget has a proposed rate increase of 6.5% with no proposed decreases to levels of service.

10        In line with an early engagement approach, staff have worked with a range of submitters and organisations about various initiatives suggested by the community.  This has resulted in some items being included in the draft budgets - most notably, an allowance has been provided for the Otago Museum to accommodate payment of the living wage and the property budget reprioritised to allow for the remediation of the Sims building site. 

11        Council has asked staff to prepare a number of option reports as part of the development of the draft Plan, and these are also presented at this meeting.  Reports provide updates on issues including how to fund the new kerbside recycling service, options for a destination playground, the Community Housing Policy, a Sims building update and options for a sports hub at Logan Park. 

Significant forecasting assumptions

12        The uncertainty that COVID-19 presents continues to be challenging.  The move to the “Red” level in the Covid-19 Protection Framework will impact on our staff, our community, and the services that Council delivers.  The effects will be both social and economic and create challenges across the board. The draft budgets attempt to account for some of this uncertainty.

13        The 10 year plan sets out a number of significant forecasting assumptions that have been used in the development of the draft annual plan.  Some relate to growth, inflation and COVID-19. 

14        Revenue budgets have been prepared in line with the 10 year plan. There is however, a level of uncertainty about the level of external income that will actually be received, given the current COVID-19 situation. 

15        Inflation has increased to its highest level since around 2010, with annual inflation in the September 2021 quarter being 4.9%.  Actual inflation rates are higher than those assumed in the preparation of the 10 year plan, resulting in additional operating costs being incorporated into draft budgets. 

Capital budget

16        In terms of the capital budgets, good progress has been made against the 10 year plan capital programme, and this has been reported regularly to Council.  Supply chain disruptions and the move to “Red” are likely to impact on the timing of some projects when compared to the timetable in the 10 year plan.

17        Capital budget updates for 2022/23 are underway and will incorporate the impacts of timing delays that may be experienced over the next six months and will be presented at the May 2022 deliberations meeting, when more information is known.

18        There is one report, the Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme, that asks Council to consider changes to the capital programme.

Operating budgets

19        The draft operating budget for 2022/23 provides for the day-to-day running of all the activities and services the DCC provides such as core water and roading infrastructure, waste management, parks, pools, libraries, galleries and museums. The draft budget includes operating expenditure of $341.090 million (refer to Attachment A).

20        The proposed rate increase of 6.5% delivers a balanced budget. The draft budget provides a net surplus of $8.480 million.

21        Each of the DCC’s groups of activities have updated year two of their draft operating budgets as provided for in the 10 year plan. The key changes in funding sources and expected costs of delivery are explained in the group operating budget reports.

Revenue

22        The draft operating budget for 2022/23 shows overall rates revenue increasing by $11.643 million, which is 6.5% higher than 2021/22, but lower than the rate increase of 7.0% provided for in the 10 year plan.

23        At the end of 2021 Council indicated to Dunedin City Holdings Limited (DCHL) in the Letter of Expectation, that among other things, it intended to develop an Investment Plan and review the Dividend Policy.  Initial work on the plan and early discussions with DCHL indicate that the first dividend is likely in 2022/23. This reflects the positive work undertaken in recent years and is the first return on the capital investment that has been applied to the companies. The exact level of the dividend is unknown, but the budgets allow for a conversative figure of $5.500 million in 2022/23.  An update will be presented to the May 2022 deliberations meeting after work on both the investment plan and dividend policy have been progressed.

24        External revenue has increased by $7.257 million, 9.8%. The main changes to external revenue are:

·        Governance and Support Services group – an increase of $5.894 million reflecting a $5.500 million dividend from Dunedin City Holdings Limited.

·        Regulatory Services – an increase of $1.593 million primarily related to Building Services reflecting an increase in building consenting activity.

·        Community and Planning group – a decrease of $475k reflecting the removal of ICC’s contribution towards the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 (ICC WCC 2022) and Masters Games cost recoveries included in the 2021/22 budget.

25        Fees and charges are discussed separately in the group budget reports.

Expenditure

26        The draft budget provides for an increase of $3.604 million, 5.2% in personnel costs, incorporating an increase of 36.3 full time equivalent (FTE) staff.  The increase in staff numbers is to respond to the growth and associated building activity in the city, meeting the needs of businesses and the community, and delivering on a number of new initiatives.  An increase in the vacancy allowance of $1.500 million has been included.

27        The increase in staff numbers primarily relates to:

·    Responding to the demands for building and other consents so as not to cause any delay in enabling that growth: Building Services has budgeted for an additional 9 FTEs that will be fully funded by fees and charges, and Resource Consents has budgeted for 3 FTEs that will be partially funded by fees and charges.

·    In order to reduce reliance on contractors and create capacity and resilience: increase of 5 FTEs for project management / procurement, to enable more efficient project delivery and insourcing. 

·    Following Council’s decision to implement a new kerbside recycling service, waste management has budgeted for an additional 4.8 FTEs (4 fixed term) to manage the new kerbside collection contract and implement other waste futures work. 

·    The development of aquatic services including the new Mosgiel Pool: 4.5 FTEs are a reinstatement of staff for the new Mosgiel Pool, and for administrative support at Moana Pool.

·    To meet rostering obligations: Galleries, libraries and museums has budgeted for an additional 4.2 FTEs primarily as visitor hosts and technical specialists for the Art Gallery and Toitū.  

·    To deliver on the zero carbon initiatives and Maori Partnerships: Corporate Policy has budgeted for an additional 1.8 FTEs.  

28        A vacancy allowance is once again provided for in the budget to recognise that in an organisation of this size, we will always carry vacancies. It has been increased this year in part to recognise what will be recruitment challenges and in part to reflect actual savings that have been achieved in recent years. This allowance is managed centrally and sits in the Governance Group.

29        Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $5.140 million, 7.6%. The main changes are due to:

·        3 Waters – an increase of $2.338 million primarily related to sludge removal and disposal from the Tahuna wastewater treatment plant ($1.197 million). Previously this was an internal cost paid to the Green Island Landfill ($752k). Other changes reflect increases in maintenance and chemicals.

·        Property – an increase of $1.442 million mainly relates to increased compliance work, additional maintenance and cost increases.

·        Waste Management – an increase of $958k relates primarily to increases in costs associated with operating the Green Island Landfill.

·        Governance and Support Services group – a reduction of $1.500 million reflecting required savings. 

30        Occupancy and property-related costs such as rates and insurance have increased by $684k, 2.5%.

31        Consumables and general costs have decreased by $584k, -2.4%. The main changes are due to:

·        Governance and Support Services group – a reduction of $456k reflecting required savings of $1.000 million. Increases include BIS contract costs and providing services for the local body election.

·        Community and Planning group – a decrease of $244k reflecting the removal of funding for the ICC WCC 2022 included in the 2020/21 budget.

32        Grants and subsidies expenditure has increased by $467k, 4.6%, primarily reflecting year two of the 10 year plan.  Work has been undertaken with the Otago Museum, and in addition to the 10 year plan grant provision for the Otago Museum, the budget has increased to allow the Otago Museum to pay the living wage to its staff, in line with DCC policy.

33        Depreciation has increased by $9.077 million, 11.9% reflecting the impact of the latest revaluations as well as the capital expenditure programme, however more work is needed to finalise the depreciation budget.

34        Interest expense has increased by $799k, 8.0% reflecting the predicted increase in debt funding required to support the planned capital expenditure programme.  The 10 year plan interest assumption of 2.85% is still applicable for the 2022/23 financial year.  There is still upward pressure on interest rates, but Dunedin City Treasury Limited continues to manage this risk through interest rate hedging, sourcing both short and long term funding and managing overall cash on hand.

3 Waters Strategic Work Programme

35        A report presenting possible options to enable delivery of the 3 Waters Strategic Work Programme, which considers the transition to a new 3 Waters entity, is being developed.  As there is a level of uncertainty about any Government funding that may be available to progress the transitional work, the report will be presented to Council at its deliberations meeting in May 2022, when further information is known. 

Revenue Policy for Community Housing

36        At its meeting on 31 May 2021, Council requested that a review of the Revenue and Financing Policy for Community Housing be undertaken to inform the 2022/23 Annual Plan.

37        Rental fees for community housing are proposed to increase by between 3.6% - 4.2%, being between $4 - $8 per unit per week. This would achieve compliance with the current revenue policy - 90% of the operating cost funded from rents, and 10% from rates, before providing for any increase in depreciation.  The increase in fees would take effect from 1 August 2022.  Once the depreciation expense has been confirmed, staff will provide an update on compliance with the revenue policy.

38        A review of the Revenue Policy for community housing has not yet been undertaken but will be completed following the completion of work on the depreciation expense. 

Performing Arts

39        On 31 May 2021 a report that summarised feedback received during the 10 Year Plan consultation on the development of a performing arts venue was presented for Council consideration. Council resolved that staff re-engage with the performing arts community in relation to venue options and report back as part of this annual plan process.

40        From October to December 2021 staff met with representatives from existing performing arts venues, organisations, and individual practitioners. Staff asked for their feedback about proposed options for a performing arts venue. The engagement process has highlighted a number of priority areas, issues and opportunities that require further time to explore and analyse. 

41        A separate report for this has not been prepared for this meeting as conversations with the performing arts community are ongoing and there are no budgetary implications for this Annual Plan.  An update report will be presented to the Community and Culture Committee in February 2022.  The current 10 year plan capital budget of $17.1 million is unchanged. 

Engagement

42        Under section 82 (2A) of the Act, Council is not required to consult on the draft Plan if it doesn’t include significant or material differences from year two of the Council’s 10 year plan 2021-31 (10 year plan). 

43        The draft Plan does not include any significant or material differences to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Council is therefore not required to undertake any formal engagement. 

44        Following decisions made at this meeting, a report will be presented to the February 2022 Council meeting outlining options for engagement.  The report will include recommendations that any engagement on the draft Plan includes pre-engagement on the next 10 year plan (2024-34).

45        This report has been delayed until February 2022 to better assess the implications of the current red traffic light settings and determine what might be the best options for engagement given the Omicron situation.  In all likelihood our ability to hold face to face engagement will be extremely limited, and the report will look to a range of other options. 

 

 

Signatories

Author:

Gavin Logie - Chief Financial Officer

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Draft operating budget 2022/23

27

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Group Activities contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The draft budgets continue to support the principles of sustainability and financial resilience, as outlined in the 10 year plan, most notably in the Infrastructure Strategy and in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides draft budget information for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

A report on options for engagement will be presented to Council in February 2022. 

Engagement - internal

Staff from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets and reports.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Reserves and Recreational Facilities

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        Aquatic Services

·        Botanic Garden

·        Cemeteries and Crematorium

·        Parks and Recreation

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities  Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Reserves and Recreational Facilities as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for the Group has increased by $2.293 million, 7.2%, reflecting increased costs noted below including the new Mosgiel pool which will be operational in the latter half of the year.

External Revenue

4          External revenue has increased $198k, 3.7% and reflects a general 3% increase in fees and charges across most activities.  The budget also includes the reinstatement of revenue from the Mosgiel pool.

Grants and Subsidies Capital

5          Grants and Subsidies capital revenue decreased $4.000 million reflecting the grant from Taieri Facilities Trust towards the new Mosgiel pool which was a one-off budget in 2021/22.

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

6          Personnel costs have increased by $468k, 5.7% across the Group.  Aquatic Services costs have increased $356k including staffing requirements for the new Mosgiel Pool facility.

Operations and Maintenance

7          Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $127k, 0.9%. 

8          Reserves costs have increased $154k due to an increase in the trees and reserves maintenance contract.

9          An increase of $250k in coastal planning work, including geobag (sand sausages), dune and beach maintenance.

10        Service level agreement costs have reduced by $370k due to the removal of the Property Arrangement Grant to High Performance Sport.  This is offset by a corresponding reduction in budgeted rent revenue in the Property budget.

Occupancy Costs

11        Occupancy costs have increased by $214k and include the planned rate increase for the Group’s properties, and the reinstatement costs associated with the new Mosgiel pool (energy, rates, and water charges).

Grants and Subsidies

12        Grants and subsidies have decreased by $174k.  A one-off grant for $187k in 2021/22 for the Dunedin North Intermediate school pool has been removed.

Depreciation

13        Depreciation has increased by $1.310 million, an estimate based on the latest asset revaluation, along with the commissioning of the new Mosgiel pool.

Interest

14        Interest expense has increased by $491k, reflecting the capital expenditure programme including completion of the new Mosgiel pool.

FEES and charges

15        Fees and charges for Reserves and Recreational Facilities have generally been increased by 3% (with some rounding), including sportsgrounds, swimming pool charges and cemetery and crematorium charges.

16        New fees have been introduced for a variety of classes for the Swim School and half-season passes for Port Chalmers and St Clair pools.

 

Signatories

Author:

Scott MacLean - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Reserves and recreational facilities draft budget for 2022/23

33

b

Reserves and recreational facilities draft fees and charges for 2022/23

34

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Options for a sports hub at Logan Park

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

1          This report responds to a Council resolution requesting options for the establishment of a sports administration hub at Logan Park and summarises the associated work with Sport Otago, Tennis Otago, the Otago Polytechnic, and other stakeholders to date.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Requests staff prioritise the development of a Reserve Management Plan for Logan Park in order to inform the potential development of a sports hub

 

BACKGROUND

2          Council, at its meeting of 31 May 2021 resolved:

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Council:

 

Requests staff work with Sport Otago, Otago Polytechnic, Tennis Otago and other stakeholders on options for a sports hub facility at Logan Park and report back in time for the 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2021/116)

 

3          This report responds to that resolution.

DISCUSSION

4          Logan Park is utilised for a variety of organised and informal sports and occasional cultural events.  It is situated adjacent to the University of Otago Oval, Forsyth Barr Stadium and near the Otago Polytechnic and the University of Otago.  It features permanent features such as two multi-sport artificial turf playing surfaces and artificial hockey turfs. 

5          Although separate parks, stakeholders often refer to the University of Otago Oval as being situated at Logan Park.  This is broadly the area bounded by Butts Road, Harbour Terrace and Union Street.

6          The Logan Park reserve is used seven days a week for competition sport, training, informal recreation, and occasional events.  Demand for bookable playing space is high throughout the year.

What is a Sports Hub?

7          Sports hubs are places where either multiple sports are played, or sport and recreations is administered, or both.  Sports hubs can be indoors or outdoors or a combination and some have other amenities such as cafés and bars. 

8          Sport New Zealand promote sports and recreational hubs, sometimes called a “Sportsville”.  The model sees clubs and community groups combine resources, use the same facilities, work together to share costs and services, and develop new ideas.

9          The following are examples of New Zealand sports hubs or Sportsvilles.  Each accommodates a range of sport, recreation and leisure activities at one site, covering both indoor and outdoor activities.  They are also home to a number of sports clubs of varying codes and each promotes collaboration.

a)         Papatoetoe Sports Centre Sportsville – Mission Statement: “To provide world class community facilities and services that maximise participation in sport, recreation and leisure”. 

b)        Moutere Hills Community Centre Sportsville, Upper Moutere – Mission Statement: “To provide and promote recreational, social and cultural services by providing an accessible and affordable Centre for use by the Tasman region at large”.

c)         The Elmwood Club Sportsville, Christchurch – Objective Statement: “To provide and promote sport, recreation and wellbeing to the affiliated clubs and to the local community”.

d)        Fraser Park Sportsville, Lower Hutt – Purpose Statement: “... to create sports communities that make it easier for clubs to attract new members, offer new programmes and control operational costs by pooling resources”. 

10        Some of the above examples provide specific space and facilities for sports administration and all provide for shared services.  There are governance structures (i.e. Charitable Trusts or Boards) in place and a mix of funding models.  All of them provide space for sports and recreation clubrooms, change facilities and other related amenities.  Councils are not the operating body for any of the examples above.

Sports Hub at Logan Park – Stakeholder Feedback

11        Some of the major institutional stakeholders associated with Logan Park were engaged between July and August 2021 to establish what they viewed as their priorities in a sports hub.  The key points of those discussions are summarised in the following table: 

Stakeholder

Summary of needs

Tennis Otago

·      Lounge area for competition use, with bar or café facility.

·      Changing rooms and toilets.

·      Office space for two or three permanent desks.

·      A minimum of two covered courts adjacent to a hub, for coaching.

·      Carparking.

Sport Otago

·      Would like more office space. 

·      Sporting organisations are looking to move and expand, putting pressure on for a sports hub that can accommodate their needs.

·      Carparking.

Otago Polytechnic

·      Space for group fitness classes.

·      Exercise and health related teaching space.

·      Massage rooms.

·      Office space.

·      Hydrotherapy pool.

·      Carparking.

Otago Hockey

·      Prefer refurbishment of the existing building that overlooks hockey courts.

·      Interested in office space in shared facility.

·      Carparking.

Unipol

·      Interested in having access to any multisport surfaces, may have interest in a building itself.

12        Prior discussions with Football South and Cricket Otago have indicated a preference for additional administration space (to allow for shared services) and improved and additional change facilities.  Football South have also indicated a need for equipment storage close to the artificial turf.

13        Discussions are yet to be held with other key stakeholders.  These include Otago Rugby, Athletics and sporting and cultural event organisers such as Dunedin Venues Management Limited.

14        None of the stakeholders engaged to date indicated a need to provide for clubrooms outside of their focus sport.

Logan Park Hub Sites

15        Most of the greenspace at Logan Park is designated as playing surface.  There is some greenspace below Butts Road/Dundas Street, adjacent to the tennis courts that is not utilised for sports.

16        Tennis Otago has proposed a hub site within the current footprint of the site they occupy as part of a tennis development.

17        Without sacrificing greenspace at Logan Park, it is unlikely a built facility would be large enough to accommodate indoor sports and recreation space and administrative space.

18        If the primary purpose of a sports hub is administrative, it would not necessarily need to be situated on or adjacent to sports fields, nor would it necessitate a new build.  An existing building could be used at another location.

19        The University of Otago grandstand has been identified as earthquake prone.  One of the seismic strengthening options provides for an additional 900 m2 of indoor floor space, spread over several levels.

20        If the preference was to provide for an administrative hub in the wider Logan Park area, consideration could be given to how the nearby University of Otago Oval grandstand and associated office space is configured and utilised as part of the seismic strengthening project.

21        Further discussions with Sport Otago have confirmed its primary preference is for DCC to prepare a management plan for the wider Logan Park area, that guides current and future use and development of the reserve to allow for informed decisions and a cohesive, integrated use of Logan Park and surrounds.

22        Parks and Recreation Services (PARS) staff are currently undertaking a review of sports facilities in Dunedin.  Feedback from stakeholders through the development of this review is that the highest priority is for more indoor sports playing facilities.  The sport identified as most in need of suitable indoor facilities is gymnastics.  The majority of stakeholders also indicated a preference for easing pressure on Logan Park by spreading sport and facilities out to other locations around the city.

23        Logan Park does not currently have a specific Reserve Management Plan (RMP).  Individual RMP’s are developed where reserves have unique values that require a greater degree of management than provisions covered in the Reserves – General Policies.  RMP’s provide guidance on future development of reserves and consider the needs of the community as a whole.

24        Logan Park has been identified by staff as a reserve that would benefit from having a specific RMP given the high use and high demand of the reserve.  It would be sensible to consider the wider area and include the adjacent University of Otago Oval and associated grounds within a single RMP.

OPTIONS

Option One – Prioritise the development of a Reserve Management Plan for Logan Park in order to inform the potential development of a sports hub (Recommended option)

25        It is clear from consultation and the past development plan work that there are a variety of needs for Logan Park as a key city reserve. The prioritisation and development of a Reserve Management Plan and the completion of Sports Facilities Review will ensure Council makes the best investment decisions. The development of a Reserve Management Plan would be prioritised to inform investment decisions – including a potential sports hub – in time for the next 10 Year Plan. 

Advantages

·        Provide a clear management plan to inform investment decisions are made on the provision of new sports facilities or other developments at Logan Park.

·        Allows time for engagement with stakeholders to fully identify needs.

·        Allows time to assess the potential opportunity created by the seismic strengthening of the University of Otago Oval grandstand.

·        Allows time to identify budgetary implications.

Disadvantages

·        Some sporting organisations will continue to operate with no shared service or facility model.

Option Two – Establish a sports administration hub at Logan Park in the absence of an Reserve Management Plan

Advantages

·        Some sports organisations will be able to share facilities.

·        The building could provide for new change facilities and storage for sports codes.

Disadvantages

·        Would potentially not align with the outcomes sought in a Logan Park Reserve Management Plan.

·        Would potentially not align with the findings and priorities of the draft Sports Facilities Review.

·        Limited time to consider opportunity created by the seismic strengthening of the University of Otago Oval grandstand.

·        May compromise greenspace.

·        Does not provide for indoor sports playing space.

NEXT STEPS

26        If Council choses to prioritise a Reserve Management Plan for Logan Park, engagement will be undertaken with major stakeholders. The RMP will determine an integrated approach for the management of a key city asset.  A revised list of RMPs and regular updates on progress will be provided to the appropriate Committee. 

27        Staff will complete the Sports Facilities Review will and report back to Council on its findings.

28        Staff will report back in time for the next 10 Year Plan on options with budget implications.

 

Signatories

Author:

Scott MacLean - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

RMP’s consider how reserves are managed and takes into account the community’s needs, balanced against the unique values of the reserve.  Social wellbeing is an important consideration in RMP’s and helps guide reserve development enhancing opportunities to improve social wellbeing.  Development of RMP’s is also a fundamental part of the Parks and Recreation Strategy.

Māori Impact Statement

Māori would be engaged throughout the drafting of an RMP.  Cultural values would be incorporated and guide future management of the Reserve.

Sustainability

The development of RMPs contribute to the sustainability of reserves.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report is in response to submissions to the LTP regarding a sports administration hub facility at Logan Park.  No budget has been provided in the current 10 Year Plan for the establishment of a sports administration hub at Logan Park.

Financial considerations

Development of an RMP for Logan Park would be prioritised and undertaken within existing                                                                                                       budgets.

Significance

This decision is considered low in terms of the Council's Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

Staff have engaged with Sport Otago, Otago Polytechnic, Tennis Otago, Otago Hockey, Squash Otago, University Squash Club and Unipol through the preparation of this report. Further engagement is required to fully understand the needs of Logan Park users. 

Engagement - internal

Internal engagement has been with relevant Parks and Recreation staff.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Logan Park is adjacent to the West Harbour Community Board area boundary.  All Community Boards may have an interest in this decision.

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Destination Playspaces Options Report

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report responds to a Council resolution requesting options for the development of a new destination playspace.

2          The report also provides a destination playspace and provision assessment for Dunedin, which includes relevant New Zealand example projects and associated costs.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the options for Destination Playspaces.

 

BACKGROUND

3          Council, at its meeting of 31 May 2021 resolved:

 

Moved (Mayor Aaron Hawkins/Cr David Benson-Pope):

That the Council:

a)         Supports, in principle, the development of a new destination playground; and

 

b)          Requests an options report in time for consideration as part of the Draft Annual Plan 2022-2023.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2021/130) with Cr Andrew Whiley recording his vote against

 

4          This report responds to that resolution.

DISCUSSION

5          Prior to considering what would be required in a new destination playspace if one were to be developed, it was important to understand what was already provided for in Dunedin and what investment options Council has.

6          Staff commissioned consultants Bespoke Landscape Architects (BLA) to undertake a destination playspace provision assessment for Dunedin and provide relevant New Zealand examples of destination playspace investment (Attachment A).

7          Destination playspaces are broadly accepted in the recreational industry as having supporting infrastructure, features, and amenities such as (but not limited to): large gathering spaces, picnic and BBQ facilities, toilets (with baby change facilities), built and natural shade areas, drinking fountains and a variety of park furniture.  They typically include at least one large multi-play centrepiece feature.

8          Based on this definition, Dunedin has three playspaces with a mix of these features: Marlow Park, Woodhaugh Gardens and Mosgiel Memorial Gardens and all three are managed as destination playspaces.

9          BLA’s assessment of Dunedin’s destination playspaces showed some deficiencies in providing for current play trends such as inclusive play, adventure and natural play, age-appropriate play, self-directed/challenging play, and accessibility.

10        Their assessment of Marlow Park found that while serviced by facilities and amenities, the play equipment is scattered and the use of space inefficient.  The equipment provides for a baseline level of play experience for those aged 0 – 14 but that significant improvements could be made to improve multiple use, connected and self-directed play, in addition to providing for the older demographic of 10 – 14+ years of age.  The equipment at Marlow Park is considered old and outdated compared to modern standards.

11        Woodhaugh Gardens was found to provide a basic level of service but requires investment to provide meaningful destination-level provision across all age ranges and play value attributes.  Accessibility is limited due to lack of all-weather surfaces and inclusive play elements that encourage social interaction are lacking.

12        Mosgiel Memorial Park was shown to provide a good range of equipment and level of service, but the layout is scattered and is an inefficient use of space which limits the park’s ability to reach its maximum potential.  The layout provides challenges for caregivers supervising several children of varying ages.  BLA suggest that significant improvements could be made to improve multiple use, connected and self-directed play.

13        BLA’s report shows a good distribution of existing destination playspaces in Dunedin (shown at Attachment B) covering the main catchment areas of the city.

14        The assessment showed that the layout at all three playspaces does not support contiguous play and does not provide for easy parent/caregiver observation of children at play.

Green-Fields Investment

15        Establishing a new destination playspace at a green-fields site would potentially require investment in supporting infrastructure such as toilets, BBQ’s, paths, fences, and water supply.  This would result in higher site establishment costs than an existing site that already has all or some of that supporting infrastructure.

16        A suitable site would need to be identified.  Ideally the site would be flat, easily accessible, be on or close to public transport routes and have sufficient carparking available.

17        The destination playspace map (Attachment B) indicates that the development of a new “green-fields” destination playspace would service areas already provided for, or within a short commute of existing destination playspace.

18        Based on BLA’s level-of-provision assessment and the catchment distribution of existing destination playspaces, investment in a new, fourth destination playspace is not the recommended investment option at this time.  On that basis staff considered what the various upgrade options were for the existing destination playspaces.

19        There are three options for Council to consider: investment in one destination playspace, invest in all three destination playspaces or create a new destination playspace.

20        Investment in one or more existing playspaces would address the deficiencies identified by the BLA report. Some existing equipment could be retained at all three destination playspaces; for example, Marlow Park is colloquially known as the “Dinosaur Park”, so that is a piece of equipment that could be retained and refurbished. Spreading investment across all three sites may attract localised community fundraising.

21        Each of the three-existing destination playspaces offer a unique setting, being coastal (Marlow Park), woodland (Woodhaugh Gardens) and suburban (Mosgiel).  There is an opportunity to create three different ‘destination’ experiences working with the unique settings of each.

Indicative costs

22        Establishing destination playspaces typically attract high capital cost.

23        The BLA report includes several New Zealand examples of destination playspace development projects, ranging from large scale to small scale and associated levels of investment for reference.

24        The per-metre development costs for four relative projects across New Zealand range from $411 per m2 (Avalon Playspace, Wellington 2016) to $923 per m2 (Kopupaka Playspace, Auckland 2021).

25        Christchurch’s Margaret Mahy playspace was completed in 2015.  It covers an area of 6,000 m2 and had a construction cost of $4 million (playground construction only).

26        A more recent example is Auckland’s Kopupaka playspace.  This was completed in 2021, cost $6 million ($923 per m2) and covers an area of 6,500 m2.  This was a green-fields development.

27        For reference, Mosgiel Memorial Park playground occupies an area of 5,500 m2, Woodhaugh Gardens playground occupies an area of 4,300 m2, and Marlow Park playground occupies an area of 3,500 m2 (with an additional 5,700 m2 of open/greenspace and hard surface “learn-to-ride” amenity). 

28        The current 10-year plan includes budgets for minor renewal and upgrade work at each of the three destination playspaces. However, in order to raise the quality of the facilities to an appropriate standard an estimated total capital investment of $4 to $6 million spread across the three destination playspaces would be required.  Any increased operational costs are difficult to quantify at this stage without knowing the type of play equipment or facilities.

OPTIONS

Option One – Spread investment across all three existing destination playspaces

29        The destination playspace and provision assessment shows that each of the existing destination playspaces have some deficiencies in providing for current play trends, accessibility and that some equipment is outdated and old.

30        However, with investment each of the three-existing destination playspaces provide an opportunity to create three different ‘destination’ experiences working with the unique settings of each.

Advantages

·        All existing destination playspaces are upgraded to provide for current trends in play and accessibility.

·        Outdated and old equipment is replaced at all three locations.

·        Each main city catchment area receives investment in a destination playspace.

Disadvantages

·        No disadvantages identified.

Option Two – Invest in one existing destination playspace

Advantages

·        The scale of investment is focussed on one site so allows for greater provision of equipment and play experience in a single location than would be possible by spreading investment.

Disadvantages

·        Deficiencies in play provision and accessibility already identified is not remedied at all three locations. 

Option Three – Develop a new “green-fields” destination playspace

Advantages

·        The community is provided with a new destination playspace at a new location.

Disadvantages

·        Deficiencies in play provision and accessibility already identified are not remedied at any of the three existing destination playspaces. 

NEXT STEPS

31        The Play Space Plan 2021 requires consultation with the community regarding the development of playspaces.

32        The next steps will be informed by the particular option chosen by Council.

33        If Council choses to invest in all three playspaces, consultation will be undertaken to understand community views including the relative development priorities of each playspace. If Council choses to invest in one playspace or in a new green-fields development, staff will consult on these options.

34        The consultation results will be presented back to Council. This would include a costed plan and a proposed staging of the investment.

35        Staff will continue to implement the Play Space Plan 2021.

 

Signatories

Author:

Scott MacLean - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Bespoke Landscape Architects Destination Playspace Assessment

54

b

Destination playspace distribution map

75

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the social well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

This decision relates to providing a public service that is considered good-quality and cost-effective.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Providing Destination Playgrounds aligns with the Parks and Recreation Strategy. It also promotes community well-being and provides an opportunity to include art in infrastructure.

Māori Impact Statement

Equitable access for all will be included in any playspace upgrade.  Māori will be engaged to provide input into accessibility and cultural play value.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.  Sustainable solutions will be included as part of any procurement of new playground assets.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Depending on the decision of Council, investing in destination playground will have budget implications.

Financial considerations

Capital and the associated increased operational budget for investment in destination playgrounds is not currently provided for in the 10 Year Plan.

Significance

This decision is considered low in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

Consultation would be required with the community in line with the Play Spaces Plan 2021.

Engagement - internal

Relevant teams will be engaged throughout any development of destination playgrounds.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Mosgiel Memorial Park is within the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board area.  All Community Boards may be interested in the outcome of this decision.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Proposal for the development of a covered winter cricket training facility

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The Otago Cricket Association submitted to Council’s 2021/31 10 Year Plan.  The submission sought permission to construct a winter training facility on Council land.

2          Council, at its meeting of 31 May 2021 requested staff continue to work with the Otago Cricket Association and provide an options report for consideration as part of the Annual Plan.

3          This report summarises work with the Otago Cricket Association to date.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the report and ongoing positive discussions with the Otago Cricket Association regarding the development of a covered winter cricket training facility.

b)     Notes that a number of sites were assessed, and Tonga Park is the Otago Cricket Association’s preferred location.

c)     Notes that further consultation needs to be undertaken with affected parties if Tonga Park is progressed as the preferred site.

d)     Notes that the proposed development and its ongoing maintenance will come at no cost to Council.

 

BACKGROUND

4          The Otago Cricket Association (OCA) submitted to Council’s 2021/31 10 Year Plan.  The submission sought permission to construct a covered winter cricket training facility.  Tahuna Park was identified in OCA’s submission as the preferred site.

5          Council, at its meeting of 31 May 2021 resolved:

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr Rachel Elder):

That the Council:

Notes that staff would continue to work with Otago Cricket to investigate a permanent greenhouse that supported covered outdoor training pitches for year round use, and would provide a report on options to Council by December 2021.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2021/125)

 

6          This report provides an update on the work that has occurred with OCA since May 2021.

Discussion

7          Following the 2021/31 10 Year Plan deliberations, staff worked with OCA and identified several sites for consideration: Tahuna Park, Seddon Park, Opoho Park, Walton Park, Bayfield Park and Tonga Park.

8          In order for the facility to meet its needs, OCA outlined the factors to consider when assessing each site.  These included:

·        Distance of travel and ease of transport to the site for players and visiting international teams.

·        Access to toilet and change facilities.

·        Proximity to current infrastructure, including water supply and 3-phase power.

·        Site security.

·        Impact on current ground use.

·        Position to the sun in winter months.

9          Staff worked closely with OCA on assessments of the various sites that were identified initially, and Tonga Park was the site that best met all criteria and is OCA’s preferred site.

Stakeholder Considerations

10        Tonga Park is currently used for cricket during the summer season and is the home base of the Carisbrook Cricket Club.  OCA have engaged with the Club who are supportive in-principle for the development to proceed at Tonga Park.

11        During the winter months, Tonga Park is used for football and is the home base of the Caversham Football Club.  There may be some minor impact to winter sports fields, such as field boundaries which the Caversham Football Club has been made aware of.  The Club is supportive in principle for the development to proceed. 

12        There are existing cricket practice nets adjacent to the Queens High School boundary.  OCA has proposed to reposition those nets elsewhere at Tonga Park.  This would be in consultation with the other formal users of the park. 

13        The footprint of the proposed facility is relatively small, and any loss of amenity will be minor. Any loss will be offset by improvements planned by OCA who has indicated that over time it will look to invest in the existing built facilities (club rooms, toilets and change facilities) which will benefit the clubs that utilise them currently and the community.

14        The proposed facility will be owned, managed, and maintained by OCA.  Furthermore, OCA has confirmed there will be no capital or ongoing operational cost to Council.  Council will continue to own the land.

15        OCA will control access to the proposed facility, and it will not be accessible to the public. However, the facility will support pathway development and performance cricketers and will also be utilised by New Zealand national teams, international visiting teams, and representative domestic teams.

Regulatory Matters

16        The proposed facility measures 19.2 metres wide, by 65 metres long with a total footprint of 1,248 m2.  The facility will house nine cricket training wickets at each end and 25 metre central grass run-ups. 

17        A building of that size exceeds the permitted activity allowance for new buildings within land designated as recreation in the District Plan will require a resource consent.

18        OCA will be responsible for obtaining all necessary consents, including consultation with affected parties and any service connections required.

19        OCA are aware that Tonga Park is low lying and prone to flooding.  The proposed site is adjacent to a groundwater monitoring bore owned and managed by the Otago Regional Council (ORC).  Consultation will need to be carried out with the ORC regarding this.

20        Tonga Park is Council-owned freehold land and is not subject to the Reserves Act 1977. 

21        Should agreement be reached with affected parties, and all necessary consents be obtained for this development, a lease agreement authorised under the Local Government Act 2002 for the footprint of the development, will be drafted between Council and OCA for the use of part of Tonga Park.  The CEO has the delegation to execute such a lease.  This is consistent with several sport and recreation club facilities in Dunedin, where the clubs own the buildings and Council own the land the buildings are sited (e.g. Green Island Rugby Football Club building at Miller Park and the Dogs New Zealand facility at Forrester Park).

Options

22        While Council requested an options report, after working closely with OCA and jointly assessing several sites, Tonga Park appears to be most appropriate site to progress further. Staff and OCA consider Tonga Park presents the best location for the facility. The proposed site will provide a high-quality ‘Cricket Centre of Excellence’ for the city at no cost to Council. 

Next Steps

23        Staff will continue to work with OCA, liaise with other stakeholders and progress Tonga Park as the preferred location for a covered winter cricket training facility.

24        OCA will attend to the regulatory matters, including obtaining all necessary consents and affected party consultation.

25        Staff will provide progress updates to Infrastructure Services Committee.

 

Signatories

Author:

Scott MacLean - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Tonga Park Cricket Training Facility Proposed Site

82

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the social and cultural wellbeing of communities in the present and for the future by supporting sport and recreation.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The development of pathway and performance cricketers supports the sport of cricket in Dunedin and aligns with the aims and objectives of the Parks and Recreation Strategy 2017.  This proposal contributes to social wellbeing through sport.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for Māori.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy/Infrastructure Strategy

The Otago Cricket Association’s proposal comes at no cost to Council.

Financial considerations

The Otago Cricket Association’s proposal comes at no cost to Council.

Significance

This decision is considered low in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

To date staff have worked with the Otago Cricket Association and Caversham Football Club.

Engagement - internal

Staff have engaged with City Planning staff.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.  The footprint of the proposed development if to proceed at Tonga Park, will be administered by way of a lease authorised under the Local Government Act 2002.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no known implications for Community Boards.

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Waste Management

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Waste Management Group. 

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Waste Management Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Waste Management as shown/amended at Attachment B.

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for the Group has increased by $1.709m, 36.8%.  This increased funding reflects declining volumes through the Green Island landfill.

External Revenue

4          External revenue has increased by $18k.  This is made up of an increase in Waste Levy revenue of $188k from Ministry for the Environment (MfE), offset by a decrease in Green Island landfill revenue due to a reduction in tonnage of waste going to the landfill. 

Internal Revenue

5          Internal revenue has decreased by $800k primarily due to Tahuna wastewater treatment plant now diverting sludge to an external provider as Green Island Landfill no longer has capacity for sludge waste.

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

6          Personnel costs have increased $393k, 45.6%.  This is largely due to additional resources for a fixed term of two years, to set up and implement the new kerbside collection services. 

Operations and Maintenance

7          Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $958k, 9.0%.  This is largely due to increases at the Green Island landfill for ETS of $442k and the landfill management contract $238k.

8          Waste Strategy costs have increased by $158k to deliver additional education and strategic programmes. Project areas include kerbside recycling checks, tyre recycling, zero-waste promotional activities, workshops and e-recycling. These costs are funded by the Waste Levy that Council receives from MfE. 

9          The cost of servicing community recycling facilities has increased by $90k due to new recycling hubs.

Depreciation

10        Depreciation has increased by $322k, 55.3%. This is due to capital expenditure at the Green Island landfill.

Interest

11        Interest has increased by $419k. This relates to debt funding required for the planned capital expenditure programme including work on the landfills and recycling programmes. 

FEES and charges

12        Fees and charges have been categorised as ‘inclusive’ or ‘exclusive’ of Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) costs. The landfill charges include costs associated with ETS as these general waste loads contribute to landfill emissions. ETS charges have increased from $37.50 to $51.50 per tonne.  Changes to fees and charges due to ETS increases range from 4.1% to 25%.

13        All waste to landfill attracts the Ministry for the Environment Waste Levy, which is currently set at $20 per tonne but is rising to $30 per tonne on 1 July 2022. In response to corrective actions contained in a ‘Disposal Facility Waste Disposal Levy Audit Report’ conducted by the Ministry for the Environment in November 2021, the Waste Levy is now being applied to material used for daily cover at the landfill.  Changes to fees and charges due to waste levy expansion range from 4.7% to 700%.

14        Where there has been no cost increase, fees and charges have been held at current rates.

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Authoriser:

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Waste management draft budget for 2022/23

88

b

Waste management draft fees and charges for 2022/23

89

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of Waste Management primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Waste Management Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Waste Management Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and management from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Kerbside Collection - Update on pay as you throw technology

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report updates Council on the development of Pay As You Throw technology (PAYT) as part of the 2022-23 Annual Plan process.  

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the report ‘Kerbside collection – update on pay as you throw technology’.

 

BACKGROUND

2          During the 10 year plan 2021-31 meeting of Wednesday 27 January 2021, Council considered a report from Waste and Environmental Solutions outlining funding options for future kerbside collection services.  At that meeting Council resolved to adopt targeted rates funding for kerbside collection bins, plus an opt-in garden waste bin funded via fees and charges, as the preferred funding source to be used for delivering kerbside collection services (CNL/2021/017).

3          Council also requested that staff provide two additional reports:

Moved (Mayor Aaron Hawkins/Cr Christine Garey):

That the Council:

a)        Requests, in time for the next Annual Plan 2022-23, a report outlining options for both flat and progressive targeted rates for the kerbside collection service.

 

b)        Ask staff to report back on the development of Pay as You Throw technology, as part of each Annual Plan process.

Motion carried (CNL/2021/018)

4          This report responds to part (b) and provides an update on the development of PAYT technology.

DISCUSSION

5          In the 10 year plan 2021-31 report ‘Kerbside Collection Funding Options’ staff identified PAYT as an alternative funding option that could be applied to general waste or green waste kerbside collections. This option would allow residents to only pay for bin collections when needed.

6          As PAYT had not been proven at scale in New Zealand this option was not recommended due to uncertainty over the costs and practicality of implementation. The report identified that developments in technology may make the implementation of a PAYT system possible in the future.

7          PAYT can be seen as a method to incentivise reducing household waste, which aligns with the objectives in the DCC Waste Minimisation and Management Plan 2020.

8          Alternatively, PAYT can be seen as penalising larger or lower-income families with less ability to change their purchasing habits, and may encourage cost avoidance behaviour such as increased illegal dumping.

9          There are currently two PAYT options available for kerbside collection bins. These are:

a)         Automated Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags which allow a collection vehicle to identify each bin during collection. This information is then used to determine the associated property for billing purposes, and;

b)        Prepaid tags that are attached to a bin when it is placed at the kerbside for collection. These tags are then removed during the collection process.

10        RFID tags are widely used in several countries to identify bins and verify that bins have been collected; however, due to a relatively high error rate (10 – 15%) of identifying and/or validating the RFID tag, they are currently not commonly used as a method of charging for services. As such, a PAYT system is currently likely to involve a prepaid tag or similar prepaid system to cover the cost of collection and disposal.

11        In August 2020, the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) released a report titled ‘Recommendations for standardisation of kerbside collections in Aotearoa’. This report includes a recommendation that:

·        Rates funded refuse collections, or the use of bylaws to limit the provision of 240-litre wheelie bins by the private sector, is shown to reduce residual rubbish and reduce contamination in recycling.

The Auckland Council Experience

12        In researching for this report, staff contacted Auckland Council who were undertaking a detailed analysis of funding options for kerbside collection services, including PAYT.

13        Due to amalgamation in 2010, Auckland was unique in having a rates funded refuse service covering approximately 55% of the city, with a mixture of PAYT options covering the remaining 45%. This situation has allowed Auckland Council to directly compare these funding options side by side, including a trial of automated RFID technology.

14        The PAYT options used in Auckland City are:

a)         Pre-paid plastic bags

b)        Prepaid tags on kerbside bins

c)         Automated RFID tags on kerbside bins

15        The Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 committed to implementing a region wide PAYT charging system across Auckland.  The commitment was based on international evidence,which at the time indicated a ‘polluter-pays’ system would drive greater household waste minimisation behaviour and create a financial incentive to save money by reducing waste.

16        Auckland Council has subsequently evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of both rates funded and PAYT kerbside collection services. A report on the results of this evaluation was presented to their Finance and Performance Committee on 8 December 2021 (https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2021/12/FIN_20211208_AGN_10873_AT_EXTRA_WEB.htm, item 12, ‘Annual Budget 2022/2023: Kerbside refuse charging policy review’). The executive summary of the Auckland Council evaluation is included with this report as Attachment A.

17        The report compared three funding options for kerbside refuse collections:

a)         region wide PAYT

b)        region wide rates-funded

c)         continuation of the hybrid model (PAYT and rates-funded services).

18        Contrary to expectations, the Auckland Council analysis found no significant difference in refuse volumes between PAYT areas and rates funded areas of the city. The results also indicated that limiting the volume available for general waste is more effective than different funding methodologies for reducing waste volumes. The analysis also included a review of refuse per capita across other New Zealand territorial authorities, which also showed little correlation between waste volumes and funding methods.

19        The Auckland Council report also cites evidence from other NZ cities and overseas that shows that positive waste minimisation outcomes can be more effectively achieved by focussing on:

·        increasing access to diversion services

·        community education programmes

·        reducing the bin volume or collection frequency for refuse to encourage the use of diversion services

20        Following the analysis of funding options for kerbside collection, the Auckland Council approved public consultation during 2022/2023 Annual Plan to move all of the Auckland region to a rate funded refuse collection service.

21        The primary findings in support of this approach were that a rates-funded service:

·        achieves the best waste minimisation outcomes, as it enables greater influence over the domestic waste stream

·        is the most cost-effective, lowest risk, and most financially resilient for the Council to deliver

·        provides Auckland Council with the greatest opportunity to respond to the climate emergency and meet the commitments set out in Auckland’s Climate Plan by reducing and mitigating emissions

·        delivers the greatest certainty for Aucklanders by enabling Auckland Council to provide a universally available, equitably priced service across the region regardless of location or income.

Application of the Auckland Experience to Dunedin

22        The kerbside collections approach adopted by Council is strongly aligned to the Auckland experience, which concluded that limiting the volume available for general waste and increasing access to diversion services supports improved waste minimisation outcomes.

23        The new kerbside services for Dunedin include a limitation on the size and frequency of kerbside waste bins (140 Litre bin collected fortnightly), plus the addition of a food waste container that is collected weekly, for food waste to be beneficially reused as compost.

24        The DCC Waste Minimisation and Management Plan 2020 and the Waste Futures programme, aims to increase the scope and availability of waste diversion services through expanding resource recovery infrastructure.  This includes the development of a modern Resource Recovery Park at Green Island Transfer Station, including the development of a construction and demolition waste sorting facility.  

25        These new services and facilities will be supported by increased education campaigns to ensure residents are aware of the methods and services available to them for reducing household waste.

26        Based on the Auckland experience and their analysis, staff believe that Dunedin’s expanded kerbside collection service will deliver a cost effective and equitable service and achieve Council’s strategic objectives from the Waste Minimisation and Management Plan of enabling recycling and resource recovery, and reducing waste to landfill. The Waste Futures programme will also help reduce Council’s net carbon emissions from waste to zero by 2030.

27        The recent Auckland experience has demonstrated that a PAYT system is unlikely to help achieve Council’s strategic objectives, will lead to higher costs, may create social inequity, and is unlikely to affect waste minimisation objectives. For these reasons staff do not recommend any further investigation of PAYT at this time.

OPTIONS

28        As this is an update report, no options are presented.

NEXT STEPS

29        Development of additional waste diversion options and facilities via the Waste Futures programme will continue to be progressed.

30        The procurement of increased levels of service for kerbside collections (Four Bins plus one – separate food and green waste collection) will continue.

31        Staff will consider a range of options that may deliver broader waste minimisation outcomes, including regulatory tools, which could be included in a future Waste Minimisation and Management Plan and/or Bylaw. 

32        Staff will continue to monitor any developments in PAYT technology and will report back to Council if this becomes a practicable option aligned to Council’s strategic goals.

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Authoriser:

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Exective Summary: Auckland Council Refuse Collection Advise

98

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the economic well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The increased levels of service for kerbside collections contributes to the Environment Strategy by ensuring effective reduction and management of solid waste to achieve the goals set out in its Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, with appropriate regard given to the goals of the Emissions Management and Reduction Plan.

 

Māori Impact Statement

Mana Whenua as a stakeholder have been engaged during the Better Business Case options development phase of the Waste Futures project, which supports Council’s broader waste minimisation goals. No specific discussions have been held on PAYT.

Sustainability

Based on the Auckland experience, Council’s waste minimisation objectives are aligned with increasing the facilities and opportunities available for waste diversion, alongside reducing the volume available for disposal of residual waste, rather than PAYT.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Resource recovery and waste diversion activities to support the Council’s Waste Minimisation and Management Plan, and the preferred kerbside collection option, are included in the 10 year plan 2021–31.

Financial considerations

The capital expenditure requirements for resource recovery and waste diversion facilities to support the Council’s Waste Minimisation and Management Plan, and the preferred kerbside collection options, are included in the capital budgets in the 10 year plan 2021–31.

Significance

The decision is considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

Engagement – external

The General Manager, Waste Solutions, Auckland City Council was engaged during the research and preparation of this report.

 

Engagement - internal

Waste minimisation objectives are regularly discussed with a broad number of internal departments, including Finance, Policy, Property, 3 Waters, and Transport.

 

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

 

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

 

Community Boards

Community Boards have a high degree of interest in how waste minimisation activities are undertaken, including how Council will fund kerbside collection services. 

 

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Funding Options - Kerbside Collection Service

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          As part of the 10 year plan 2021-2031, Council resolved to introduce a new kerbside collection service consisting of four bins estimated to cost between $270 - $310 per year, and an optional garden waste bin that would cost an additional $140 - $180 each year.  The new service is expected to commence in July 2023.

2          In response to a request from Council, this report outlines options for both flat and progressive targeted rates to fund this new kerbside collection service.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council

a)     Considers the options for funding the new kerbside collection service from 1 July 2023.

 

BACKGROUND

3          The Dunedin City Council is introducing a new kerbside collection service expected to commence in July 2023. The proposed service is summarised below:

i)          Existing - Glass 45 litre blue crate – collected fortnightly

ii)         Existing - Recycling (yellow lid) 240 litre (or 80 litre) wheelie bin – collected fortnightly

iii)        New - Refuse (red lid) 140 litre (or 80 litre) wheelie bin replacing the current pre-paid refuse bags – collected fortnightly

iv)        New - Food scraps 23 litre bin – collected weekly

v)         New - Garden waste 240 litre bin – collected fortnightly – optional


 

4          At the Council meeting on 27 January 2021, Council resolved as follows:

Moved (Mayor Aaron Hawkins/Cr Christine Garey)

That the Council:

a)        Requests, in time for the next Annual Plan 2022-2023, a report outlining options for both flat and progressive targeted rates for the kerbside collection service.

b)        Ask staff to report back on the development of Pay as You Throw technology, as part of each Annual Plan process.

Motion carried (CNL/2021/018)

5          This report responds to part (a) of the resolution, referencing the terms “flat” and “progressive” targeted rates.

DISCUSSION

6          The Council currently provides refuse collection via pre-paid bags purchased at various retail outlets.

7          The current kerbside recycling service is funded by a flat targeted rate of $106.10 per annum.  Residential properties (including residential heritage bed and breakfast, lifestyle and farmland properties) are charged the flat rate of $106.10 for every separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of their properties.  Commercial properties are charged the flat rate of $106.10 for each individual rating unit. 

8          This rate is only paid by properties that receive the service. Certain schools and small business are the only commercial properties that receive the kerbside recycling service. Residential, lifestyle and farmland properties only pay this charge if they live in an area that receives the service.

9          Unless specified, all rating figures in this report are GST inclusive.

Targeted rates

10        Schedule 3 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 provides a list of factors that can be used to charge targeted rates. Among the factors are:

a)         rating unit value eg: capital value (CV)

b)        the number of separately used or inhabited parts (SUIP)

c)         per rating unit

11        The Act allows a combination of factors to be used as well as different bases for different categories, for example, a rate based on capital value for commercial and SUIP for residential properties.

12        This report provides options for flat and progressive targeted rates for residential properties. The options compare the current ‘flat’ rate with a ‘progressive’ targeted rate using capital value as the basis of charging. A combination of these two methods is also considered.

OPTIONS

13        Council has asked for options for both flat and progressive targeted rates for the new kerbside collection service.

14        The 10 year plan estimated that a flat rate for the new service would cost between $270 - $310.  To show the differences between charging a flat rate and a progressive rate, the options below assume a flat rate of $290 is needed to pay for the new services.  The actual cost will not be known until the service provider procurement process has been completed.  This process is currently underway, but there is still a degree of uncertainty about the final cost of the new service. 

15        Total income collected is the same for each option - what does change is who pays what.

16        The options exclude the optional garden waste bin that will be funded separately on a user pays basis via fees and charges.

Option One – Status Quo – charge a flat rate of $290

17        Under the status quo, the kerbside collection targeted rate for residential properties is charged as a flat rate per SUIP.

18        The impacts are:

·        All properties pay the same amount for the kerbside collection service based on the number of SUIPs.

·        The continued use of a flat targeted rate is in accordance with the rating method for kerbside collection that was adopted as part of the 10 year plan 2021-2031.

Option Two – Charge a progressive targeted rate calculated on capital value

19        Option two proposed charging the kerbside collection targeted rate for residential properties on a capital value basis.

20        The impacts are:

·        Residential properties pay different amounts for the same service.

·        Lower capital value properties pay less. 

·        Higher capital value properties pay more.

·        This method of charging is different to the rating method in the 10 year plan 2021-2031.

Option Three – A combination of a flat targeted rate and a progressive targeted rate

21        Option three charges two kerbside collection targeted rates to residential properties. One based on SUIP and one based on CV. To demonstrate the impact, three different examples using different fixed portions are provided.  These are examples only, and any range of combinations are possible.

Option 3 a) – a flat rate of $29.00 (10%) and the balance by CV

Option 3 b) – a flat rate of $106.10 (the current rate 2021-2022) and the balance by CV

Option 3 c)   a flat rate of $217.50 (75%) and the balance by CV

22        The impacts are:

•          Residential properties will pay different amounts for the same service.

•          Lower capital value properties pay less. 

·        Higher capital value properties pay more.

•          This method of charging is different to the rating method in the 10 year plan 2021-2031.

Summary of options

23        The outcome of any change to the rating method is that some properties pay more and some properties pay less. Some specific property examples for each option are provided below.

Sample rates (Residential Properties)

CV

Option 1

SUIP $290.00

Option 2

CV

Option 3a

SUIP $29.00 & CV

Option 3b

SUIP $106.10 & CV

Option 3c

SUIP $217.50 & CV

345,000

290.00

224.25

230.83

248.24

273.39

385,000

290.00

250.25

254.23

264.72

279.87

420,000

290.00

273.00

274.70

279.14

285.54

464,400

290.00

301.86

300.67

297.43

292.73

530,000

290.00

344.50

339.05

324.46

303.36

600,000

290.00

390.00

380.00

353.30

314.70

750,000

290.00

487.50

467.75

415.10

339.00

 

24       Staff require a direction from Council about which option(s) should be progressed further.  If the status quo is the preferred option, then no further work is required.  If any of the other options are to be progressed, once the procurement process has been completed and costs are known, a report will be prepared for the Annual Plan 2023/24.  

NEXT STEPS

25        If Councils elects to change the method of funding kerbside collection services, staff will progress a report for the Annual Plan 2023/24. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Chief Financial Officer

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the social and environmental well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The new kerbside collection model contributes to the Environment Strategy by enabling the reduction and management of solid waste to achieve the goals set out in its Waste Management and Minimisation Plan.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

Consideration is being given to the impact of the funding requirement on the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of the community, when determining how the new kerbside collection service should be paid for.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

If a change is proposed for how the kerbside collection service is funded, the 10 year plan would need to be amended to reflect the new rating method.  An amendment to the 10 year plan would require consultation.

Financial considerations

The financial impacts are discussed in the report.

Significance

This report is not considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Any change to the funding of the new kerbside service, would require an amendment to the 10 year plan, and would need to be consulted on.

Engagement – external

Any change to the funding of the new kerbside service, will require consultation with the community.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement in identifying funding options for this report.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Any proposed change in funding the kerbside collection service may be of interest to Community Boards.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Regulatory Services

Department: Executive Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Regulatory Services Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        Alcohol Licensing

·        Animal Services

·        Building Services

·        Environmental Health

·        Parking Operations

·        Parking Services (enforcement)

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Regulatory Services Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Regulatory Services as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

 

operating budgets

Revenue

External Revenue

3          External revenue has increased by $1.593 million, 8.8%. The main revenue changes incorporate the following:

a)    $1.253 million in Building Services due to an increase in building consenting activity,

b)    $203k in Parking Services due primarily to an increase in parking infringement revenue,

c)    $126k in Animal Services from dog registrations due to increased dog numbers.

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

4          Personnel costs have increased by $1.455 million, 17.3%, due primarily to additional resources in the Building Services team to process an increased volume of consents. This increase is funded by additional Building Services fees revenue.

Internal charges

5          Internal charges have increased by $237k, 4.2%.  This reflects increased Fleet and BIS charges resulting from the additional full time equivalent staff in the Building Services team, recovered through fees and charges.

FEES and charges

6          Fees and charges are generally in line with the 10 year plan. 

7          Three new Environment Health fees have been added to recover actual processing time.  The three new fees are:

i)          New Premises Registration fee,

ii)         Class 2 Verification fee and

iii)        Corrective Action Request - remote sign off fee.

 

Signatories

Author:

Claire Austin - General Manager Customer and Regulatory

Authoriser:

Claire Austin - General Manager Customer and Regulatory

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Regulatory draft budget for 2022/23

112

b

Regulatory draft fees and charges for 2022/23

113

c

Schedule B Building Consent Charges

121

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Regulatory Services Group activities primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Regulatory Services Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Regulatory Services Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Property Services

Department: Property

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Property Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        Community Housing

·        Investment Property

·        Commercial Property

·        Operational Property

·        Community Property

·        Property management and land advisory

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Property Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Property as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for the Group has increased by $5.1m, due to increases in depreciation and maintenance costs.  These are discussed below.

External Revenue

4          External revenue has increased by $59k.

5          The main revenue changes incorporate the following:

a)         An increase of $376k in the Investment Property portfolio due to improved lease terms with various tenants following rent reviews.

b)        An increase of $182k in the Community Housing portfolio in line with the 10 year plan.

c)         A decrease of $468k in the Community Property portfolio, due to the removal of lease revenue from High Performance Sport and Dunedin Community House.  There are corresponding expenditure savings in the Reserves and Recreational Facilities Group and Community and Planning Group budgets.

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

6          Personnel costs have increased by $103k, 2.9% reflecting salary changes and provides additional project management resources.  

Operations and Maintenance

7          Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $1.4m, due to additional compliance and maintenance work.  Maintenance costs have also increased and allow for living wage increases.

Occupancy costs

8          Occupancy costs have increased by $225k.  This includes insurance and rates increase across all portfolios.  These increases are partially offset by savings in energy and cleaning costs.  

Depreciation

9          Depreciation has increased by $3.0 million.  This increase is an estimate based on the latest asset revaluation and incorporates changes to remaining useful lives of assets.  The depreciation expense is still to be finalised. 

Interest

10        Interest has increased by $191k, reflecting the capital expenditure programme for this activity.

FEES and charges

11        Rental fees for community housing are proposed to increase by between 3.6% - 4.2%, being between $4 - $8 per unit per week. This would achieve compliance with the current revenue policy - 90% of the operating cost funded from rents, and 10% from rates, before providing for any increase in depreciation.  The increase in fees would take effect from 1 August 2022.  Once the depreciation expense has been confirmed, staff will provide an update on compliance with the revenue policy.

12        No changes are proposed for Community Gallery hire fees.

13        Fees for encroachments on road reserves are proposed to increase by around 1.5%. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Anna Nilsen - Group Manager, Property Services

Authoriser:

Robert West - General Manager Corporate and Quality

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Property draft budget for 2022/23

128

b

Property draft fees and charges for 2022/23

129

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Property Group activities primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Property Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Property Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Proposed New DCC Community Housing Policy 2022

Department: Property

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1         The draft Dunedin City Council (DCC) Community Housing Policy 2022 (the draft Policy) is presented to Council for consideration and is attached as Attachment A.

2         The draft policy enacts previous Council resolutions and replaces the DCC Housing Policy 1997 that is attached as Attachment B.

3         The draft Policy will ensure that DCC owned community housing units are offered to people with limited financial means and it prioritises people over 55 years of age with urgent housing need or that require a physically accessible home.

RECOMMENDATIONS

             That the Council:

             Adopts the draft DCC Community Housing Policy 2022 with or without amendments.

 

BACKGROUND

4         The DCC’s Elderly Persons Housing Policy 1993 focused on providing housing for New Zealand citizens aged 60 years and over, as well as for those aged over 55 years of age with limited financial resources.

5         In 1995 the Council introduced the DCC’s Interim Housing Policy and lowered the eligibility age from 60 years and above to 55 years and above.  The eligibility age was lowered due to reduced occupancy in the DCC community housing portfolio and in response to an increased housing need for those aged under 60 years of age.

6         The DCC Housing Policy 1997 continued to focus on prioritising those aged over 55 years, with limited financial resources.  The DCC Housing policy 1997 also introduced city-wide housing goals and housing objectives as well as management mechanisms which reflected Council’s role in housing at this time. 

7         In 2009 the Social Housing Strategy 2010-2020 was adopted by Council after consultation.

8          On 29 January 2020 Council requested that Property Services carry out a full review of both the Dunedin Housing Policy 1997, and the Social Housing Strategy 2010-2020 as part of the Long-Term plan 2021-2031. 

9          Two further reports were provided to Council during Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 deliberations. Those reports gave an update on the Policy review and summarised the outcomes of public consultation. 

10        At the 28 September 2021 Council considered the results of a review of Council’s wait list criteria for Community Housing based on public feedback received during the 10-year plan 2021-2031 and following discussion Council resolved:

             Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Christine Garey):

That the Council:

                         a)        Decides to prioritise Council’s community housing for people aged 55 years and over with limited assets and income and those with urgent and/or physically accessible housing need.

b)     Notes that the decision will be used to develop the waitlist criteria which will be      included in the revised draft DCC Community Housing Policy.

            Motion carried (CNL/2021/179)

DISCUSSION

Proposed changes to the Policy

11       The draft Policy reflects Council’s resolutions to prioritise community housing for people aged 55 years and over with limited assets and income and those with urgent and/or physically accessible housing need through changes in the Community Housing Eligibility Criteria and the Community Housing Waitlist Prioritisation Criteria.

12       The draft Policy also introduces guidance for allocating houses and limiting the number of suitable housing offers an applicant may decline before it impacts their placement on the waiting list.

13       The draft policy is part of Council’s response to changes in Dunedin’s housing market.  It complements the work being done through the Housing Action Plan.  The Housing Action Plan work continues to partner with Kāinga Ora and other housing providers to improve the provision of housing across the city.

Eligibility Criteria 

14       To be eligible for a DCC Community Housing unit the draft Policy requires an applicant to have assets valued at less than the Asset Limit and annual earnings less than the Income Limit. 

Income Limit and Asset Limit

Income Limit

15        The draft Policy keeps the Income Limit equal to the Work and Income NZ income limit for Non-beneficiary Accommodation Supplement which are currently $45,656.00 for a one-person household and $63,908.00 for a two-person household.

16        The Work and Income NZ income limit for Non-beneficiary Accommodation Supplement is a nationally recognised tool for assessing whether a household has limited financial means. 

Asset Limit

17        The DCC Housing Policy 1997 sets the Asset Limit as 50% of the median house price in Dunedin, as of April each year.

18        The draft Policy sets the Asset Limit as equal to two times the Work and Income New Zealand income limit for Non-beneficiary Accommodation Supplement. This change would mean the Asset Limit reduces from $310,500 to $91,312.00 for a one- person household, and to $127,816.00 for a two- person household.

19        The Work and Income Non-beneficiary Accommodation Supplement income limits are adjusted each year usually from the 01 April.

The Waitlist Prioritisation Criteria

20        The draft Policy amends the Waitlist Prioritisation Criteria to reflect Council resolutions and prioritises people over 55 years of age with urgent housing need or that require a physically accessible home

Table 1 = Draft Policy Prioritisation Groups

PRIORITY GROUP

CRITERIA

Priority Group One

 

Applicants who are aged over 55 years and have an urgent housing need

AND a need for physically accessible housing.

Priority Group Two

 

Applicants who are aged over 55 years and have an urgent housing need

OR a need for physically accessible housing.

Priority Group Three

Applicants who are aged over 55 years and have a housing need,

Priority Group Four

Applicants who are aged under 55 years and have an urgent housing need

AND a need for physically accessible housing

Priority Group Five

Applicants who are aged under 55 years and have an urgent housing need

OR a need for physically accessible housing

Priority Group Six

Applicants who are aged under 55 years and have a housing need.

 

21       The waitlist prioritisation complements Kāinga Ora’s social housing provision in that Kāinga Ora are focused on the provision of housing for families and younger people.  Kāinga Ora are also best placed to work other social agencies to assist people with complex needs.

Allocation

22        The DCC Housing Policy 1997 does not include any guidance to staff as to how units should be allocated.

23        The draft Policy proposes that when a DCC unit becomes available it will be offered to the next eligible applicant on the waitlist within the highest priority group.

24        All physically accessible units will be offered to applicants with the highest priority rating who have demonstrated a need for a physically accessible unit.

Housing unit offers

25       The draft Policy outlines that where an applicant turns down three offers of housing which otherwise meets their needs, the applicant will be placed at the bottom of the waitlist within their currently priority group as of the date of their refusal to accept the third suitable offer of housing.

Potential Impacts on waitlist

26       If Council adopts the draft Policy, the expected impact on the current waitlist is summarised in the table below.

27       Staff estimate 10 housing applicants with urgent and physically accessible housing needs will move to Priority Group One.

28       Staff estimate 32 applicants who are currently on the waitlist will no longer qualify for a DCC unit because they have income and/or assets that are above the proposed limits. 

29       The potential impacts on the waitlist have been estimated by staff by completing a high-level review of all existing housing applications.  If the draft Policy is adopted a thorough review of all applications would need to be completed.

Table 2 – Summary of Waitlist impacts

CURRENT WAITLIST GROUP

NUMBER OF APPLICANTS

IMPACT ON WAITLIST

Priority Group One

164

10 applicants will move to Priority Group One.

67 applicants will move to Priority Group Two

80 applicants will move to Priority Group Three

7 applicants will no longer be eligible

Priority Group Two

21

21 applicants will no longer be eligible

Priority Group Three

95

3 will move to Priority Group Four

25 will move to Priority Group Five

67 will move to Priority Group Six

Priority Group Four

4

4 applicants will no longer be eligible

 

284

 

 

30        If Council adopts the draft Policy, the estimated number of applicants in the new waitlist groups are summarised in the table below.


 

Table 3 – Draft Policy Waitlist Groups

DRAFT POLICY WAITLIST GROUP

NUMBER OF APPLICANTS

Priority Group One

10

Priority Group Two

67

Priority Group Three

80

Priority Group Four

3

Priority Group Five

25

Priority Group Six

67

 

252

 

31        The DCC community housing waitlist will be reviewed annually.  These reviews will consider whether a DCC housing applicant’s needs, or circumstances have changed and may involve reassessing an applicant’s eligibility and/or priority rating.

0PTIONS

32       The status quo option is not presented to Council to consider as the direction has been clear from Council that the DCC Housing Policy 1997 is no longer fit for purpose and does not prioritise urgent and physically accessible housing need.

Council has the option of adopting the draft Community Housing Policy 2022 with or without amendment, or providing direction to staff to undertake further work.

 

33        The draft Policy ensures that DCC owned community housing units are offered to people with limited financial means and it prioritises people over 55 years of age with urgent housing need or that require a physically accessible home.

34        All existing tenants shall remain eligible to continue to reside in their housing unit.

Advantages

·        This draft Policy incorporates and responds to feedback from the community received as part of the 10-year plan 2021-2031 process and responds to changes in Dunedin’s housing market.

·        Applicants with urgent need would be prioritised and would potentially be on the waitlist for a shorter time.  

·        Applicants with physical accessibility requirements would be prioritised and would potentially be on the waitlist for a shorter time.

Disadvantages

·        Applying a new priority rating will mean some applicant’s priority rating will change.

·        Staff estimate that 32 applicants would no longer be eligible for a DCC unit.

NEXT STEPS

35        If adopted all new and existing housing applicants will subject to the proposed eligibility and waitlist prioritisation criteria and staff will re-prioritise all applicants currently on the waitlist.

36        Staff will work closely with any applicants who are no longer eligible for DCC community housing to assess their current situation and potentially refer them to other agencies.

37        All current waitlisted applicants will be advised in writing of changes to the Policy and how this affects them personally.

 

Signatories

Author:

Anna Nilsen - Group Manager, Property Services

Authoriser:

Robert West - General Manager Corporate and Quality

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Dunedin City Council Community Housing Policy 2022

138

b

Dunedin City Council Housing Policy 1997

142

 


SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the social well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The draft Policy as presented links to several goals within Council’s Strategic Framework.

Māori Impact Statement

Council has resolved to retain the prioritisation age at over 55 years of age to ensure that Māori and Paskifika access to DCC Community Housing is supported.  Staff will continue to engage with Mana Whenua and Mataawaka to ensure Māori housing priorities are addressed.

Sustainability

Council decisions on prioritisation of DCC Community Housing support social sustainability by catering to the needs of some of the most vulnerable members of the community.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report responds to resolutions from the 10-year plan 2021-2031.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications for Council.

Significance

This decision is considered low   in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement policy.

Engagement – external

This report responds to feedback from the community received as part of the 10-year plan 2021-2031 process.

Engagement - internal

There is ongoing internal engagement with the Manahautū, Manahautu - General Manager Maori, Partnerships, Policy, Community Development, Property, Planning and the Housing Action Plan Advisor.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Many community Board areas have community housing located within their boundaries. How members of the community are prioritised for tenancy in those houses will therefore be of interest.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Sims Building

Department: Property

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The purpose of this report is to provide an update for Council on the building at 2 Beach Street, Port Chalmers, known as the Sims Building, and the work done with the Port Chalmers Foundry Trust (‘The Trust’) since 10 Year Plan 2021-2031 deliberations in May 2021.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Sims Building Update Report.

 

BACKGROUND

History of the building and site

2          The Sims Building consists of two parts; the first part, formerly the Stevenson and Cook Foundry was constructed in 1880, and the second part constructed circa 1930’s.  The building was a key part of the ship building history of Aotearoa New Zealand in the 19th and 20th centuries and remained in operation until about 1990.

3          As part of the 1989 Local Government amalgamation the site came to the Council from the Port Chalmers Borough Council. 

4          Asbestos was discovered in and around the Sims Building in 2016, which resulted in the Port Chalmers Yacht Club (the tenants at that time) moving out. Work was then undertaken to remove the bulk of the asbestos from the building and site, including the removal of the asbestos roof. 

5          Since 2016 there has been community interest in the retention and restoration of the building, and interest in potential future development options for the building and site.

6          The building sits across various land titles as follows -

·        A small part of the 1930s extension sits on 6 Beach Street, land owned by The Maori Trustee and leased to Port Otago.

·        Another part of the 1930s extension sits on 4 Beach Street, land also owned by The Maori Trustee and leased to the Dunedin City Council.

·        A small part of the 1930s extension sits on legal road reserve on Macandrew Road.

·        The remaining part of the 1930s extension and the original 1880 building sits on 100 Blueskin Road (though often referred to as 2 Beach Street). This land is vested in the Dunedin City Council as Recreation Reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977 (‘the Act’), and forms part of the Port Chalmers Town Belt Reserve

The Trust

7          The Trust was formed in 2019 with the intention of developing plans and then fundraising to renovate and develop the Sims Building to create a community venue that would support a variety of cultural, creative, and recreational activities. 

8          In May 2021 the Trust made a submission (817085) to the 10 Year plan 2021-2031 to seek Council support for

-      retention of the building,

-      entering into an appropriate written agreement  with the Trust, which would allow the Trust to undertake fundraising and secure partners for the project, and

-      a commitment by Council to make the site safe prior to any development.

9          On 31 May 2021, as part of 10 Year Plan 2021-2031 deliberations, Council passed the following resolution:

Moved (Cr Jim O’Malley/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

            Requests that staff continue to work with the Port Chalmers Foundry Trust and other stakeholders on developing options for making the Sims Building safe and report back to Council in time for the 2022/23 Annual Plan.

            Motion carried (CNL/2021/126)

DISCUSSION

10        Council staff have worked to give effect to the resolution and have proceeded on the basis that the request to ‘making the Sims Building safe’ included both the building and surrounding site.

11        To make the site safe, the site would need to be decontaminated and the stabilisation work undertaken on the bank .

Working with the Trust

12        Council staff have met regularly with the members of the Trust and the relationship between staff and the Trust has grown over the past 12 months. 

13        The focus of meetings with the Trust has been to understand the vision and plans that the Trust have for the site, to ensure that the Trusts plans fit with the uses permitted under the Act,  and to further discuss options and costs to make the site safe for development.

14        As outlined in their submission to Council on 12 May 2021, the Trust have been working with architects and project management consultants to develop plans for the building, and in late 2021 shared initial concept plans for the proposed development in confidence with Council staff. These concept plans are included in a separate report to Council in the confidential part of the agenda.

15        The Trust has also continued to have discussions with the Port Chalmers community, with potential partners and donors for the project, and have indicated to Council staff that they have received positive responses.

16        The Manahautū also met with the Trust and advised them to meet with iwi to discuss their development plans.  Staff have offered to help facilitate any meeting between the Trust and iwi.

17        The Trust has commenced a fundraising programme with an event in October 2021, with further events planned for 2022.

Working with other stakeholders

18        In recent months Council staff have been approached by another group who are interested in developing the Sims Building and site. Initial conversations indicate that their proposed development is similar to the one proposed by the Trust. 

19        Staff are working with both parties to encourage them to collaborate.

Making the site safe

20        The site is classified as a HAIL site due to its previous industrial use, and an assessment completed in 2019  identified asbestos, arsenic, and other contaminants in the soil surrounding the building. 

21        A geotechnical assessment completed in 2017 identified that the bank on the north west side of the building is unstable with potential for slips, or rock and tree fall hazards.  This has compromised efforts to remove asbestos on the bank.

22        High level cost estimates indicate that the work to remediate contamination and to stabilise the bank are $715k.  This is for - 

i)     Full environmental clean-down of the building

ii)    Decontamination of land and bank behind the building

iii)   Construction of a rockfall fence to protect the building from future slips

23        In November 2021 the Trust commissioned their own Asbestos Management Assessment.   The Trust have shared this report with Council staff, and the report identifies similar asbestos findings as the assessment commissioned by Council staff in 2019. 

24        Budget for the remediation  work will be found within the existing Property capital renewal budget, as Council will be required to undertake remediation to ensure the safety of the site.

Permitted use of the site – 2GP and reserves Act 1977

25        As discussed above, the bulk of the site is land vested in the Dunedin City Council as Recreation Reserve subject to the Act.  The Act is clear in the permitted recreational usage of reserves –

for the purpose of providing areas for the recreation and sporting activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public, and for the protection of the natural     environment and beauty of the countryside, with emphasis on the retention of open          spaces and on outdoor recreational activities.

26        Council staff have been able to assist the Trust to refine their ideas to ensure that any development will fit within the permitted uses allowed within the Act.

27        Staff have also been able to advise the Trust on the requirements of the 2GP to ensure their plans will meet regulatory requirements.

Written agreement with the Trust

28        As outlined in their submission, the Trust have requested to enter into a formal agreement with the council to give them surety to further develop their plans and fundraising programme.

29        Staff will commence work on developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Trust (see Next Steps).

OPTIONS

30        As this is an update report there are no options

 

 

 

NEXT STEPS

31        Staff will continue to work with the Port Chalmers Foundry Trust, and other interested parties.

32        Staff will work with the Trust to develop a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the DCC and the Trust.  The MoU will give the Trust assurance and allow them to develop their plans and undertake a wider fundraising programme.

33        Council staff will develop a plan and costing to remediate the site alongside the trust and report progress regularly to Community and Culture Committee.

 

Signatories

Author:

Rory Hibbs - Property Manager

Anna Nilsen - Planning and Support Manager

Authoriser:

Robert West - General Manager Corporate and Quality

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The proposed development of a community operated venue supports a variety of cultural, social, creative, and recreational aspects of the Councils Strategic Framework.

Māori Impact Statement

The Manahautū has advised the Trust to have early discussions with iwi on their proposed development, and staff will seek to facilitate this

Sustainability

The proposed adaptive reuse of an existing heritage building fits with Council sustainability goals.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The report responds to the resolution of Council as part of 10 Year plan 2021-31 deliberations

Financial considerations

The capital required to make the site safe is included in the Property capital renewal budget

Significance

This report is considered low in terms of the Council’s significance and engagement policy.

Engagement – external

There has been engagement with the Trust and one other group interested in developing the site.

Engagement - internal

There has been internal engagement across Council departments including Parks and Recreation, City Development (Heritage Advisor), and Legal

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Remediating the site will reduce health and safety risk

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The building falls within the West Harbour Community Board area, and the Community Board are aware of the Port Chalmers Foundry Trust proposal.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - 3 Waters

Department: Executive Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the 3 Waters Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        Water supply

·        Wastewater

·        Stormwater

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the 3 Waters Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for 3 Waters as shown/amended at Attachment B.

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for the Group has increased as by $4.303 million, 6.5%.  The includes additional funding for increased operating costs and asset depreciation. 

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

4          Personnel costs have increased by $228k, 2.5% reflecting changes in salaries and associated costs. 

Operations and Maintenance

5          Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $2.337 million.  This is primarily due to:

a)         Sludge removal and disposal from Tahuna wastewater treatment plant will be treated externally due to capacity constraints at the Green Island landfill. This will increase operational costs by $1.197 million partially offset by a reduction in internal costs of $752k.

b)        Additional lime at wastewater treatment plants to reduce the volume of sludge for disposal.

c)         The cost of water treatment chemicals has increased in part due to increased freight cost resulting from the current supply chain challenges.

d)        An increase in maintenance costs.

Occupancy costs

6          Occupancy costs have increased by $375k. This includes insurance and rates increases. 

Internal charges

7          Internal charges have decreased by $632k, primarily due to sludge disposal fees no longer being charged through the Green Island landfill.  This decrease is partially offset by increased costs relating to upgrading the groups vehicle fleet.

Depreciation

8          Depreciation has been increased by $3.0 million, an estimate based on the latest asset revaluation. The depreciation expense is still to be finalised. 

FEES and charges

9          Compliance Monitoring, Re-Inspection and Consent Breaches, and Water Supply fees have increased mostly by 3% (Attachment A).

10        City-wide unit rates for wastewater are calculated on a formula for trade waste charges, using budgeted volume and cost information.  There are no proposed changes to the rates.

11        The tariff for water has been increased by 4.7% to $1.84 per cubic metre, in line with approved increases as per the 10 year plan.

.Signatories

Author:

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Authoriser:

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

3 Waters draft budget for 2022/23

162

b

3 Waters draft fees and charges for 2022/23

163

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Three Waters Group activities primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies. 

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the 3 Waters Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the 3 Waters Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Roading and Footpaths

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Roading and Footpaths Group. 

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Roading and Foothpaths Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Roading and Foothpaths as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for the Group has increased by $1.996 million, 11.1%.

Grants and Subsidies

4          Grants and subsidies capital revenue has increased $4.047 million, 24.0% reflecting the capital expenditure programme for the 2022/23 year.

5          Grants and subsidies operating revenue has increased $294k, 2.7% being subsidies from Waka Kotahi on maintenance and other eligible costs, and petrol tax revenue. 

Expenditure

Operations and Maintenance

6          Operations and maintenance costs have increased by $437k, 2.8%.  This is due primarily to an increase in contract costs.

Occupancy costs

7          Occupancy costs have decreased by $201k, reflecting a reduction in electricity for streetlights from the lower energy LEDs.

Depreciation

8          Depreciation has increased by $339k, reflecting the 30 June 2021 revaluation.  This valuation reflects assets condition and recent contract rates.

FEES and charges

9          Fees and charges for activities in the Roading and Footpaths Group have increased broadly in line with the 10 year plan. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Jeanine Benson - Group Manager Transport

Authoriser:

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Roading and footpaths draft budget for 2022/23

169

b

Roading and footpaths draft fees and charges for 2022/23

170

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Roading and Footpaths Group activities primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Roading and Footpaths Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Roading and Footpaths Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report presents options for delivering projects within the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 Dunedin Urban Cycleways (DUC) programme. 

2          The DUC programme includes the following projects: Arterials, Tunnels Trail, North East Valley cycleway, and the final portion of the Harbour Link project.

3          The DUC programme aims to provide an integrated cycle network across the City. It provides links to close the gaps in the existing cycleway network, and to extend the network further across the City.

4          The 10 Year Plan 2021-31 has an allocation of $21.9m for the DUC programme. Further investigation and planning work has determined that the cost estimates to deliver the DUC projects exceed the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 DUC budget.

5          Two options are presented in this report. Option One proposes to amend the programme to fit within the existing budget. Option Two proposed to increase the budget to deliver the Tunnels Trail route and the two Arterial routes that connect to it.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers the options to deliver cycleway projects from the 10 Year Plan 2021 – 31 Dunedin Urban Cycleways budget.

 

BACKGROUND

Dunedin Urban Cycleways Programme

6          In mid-2011, the DCC consulted on and adopted a Strategic Cycle Network (SCN). The SCN sets out primary routes for cycleways that will form a safe and integrated cycle network for the city. 

7          The Integrated Transport Strategy (ITS) was developed by DCC in 2013. The ITS aims to increase travel choices. The ITS includes a goal for Dunedin to reach a 40% active mode (walking, cycling and public transport) share by 2024. 

8          The ITS identifies that delivering the SCN is one of the mechanisms to achieve the 40% active mode share goal for Dunedin. To date, 30% of the SCN has been delivered through two DUC programmes.

9          The first DUC programme included the South Dunedin cycle network (2013 - 2015) and the Peninsula Connection project, which started in 2013 and is currently under construction.

10        The second DUC programme focused on the central city cycle network, including the Harbour Link project. The Harbour Link project will complete the connection between the SH88 and Peninsula Connection shared paths. Through the second DUC programme, the Water of Leith walking and cycling bridge was completed in 2018 and a connection between the Water of Leith bridge and St Andrew Street was started in 2018. The second DUC programme is due to be completed in 2022/23.

11        The Council considered the third DUC programme in December 2018 and endorsed a programme (Attachment B) that included the following three projects.

·        Arterials – upgrade 15.8 km (7 routes) of primary cycle routes, and related secondary routes to close gaps in the existing cycleway network.  Most of the routes are on roads where there is currently no cycle infrastructure. The routes are:

i)          Serpentine/McGlaggan Streets

ii)         Forbury Road

iii)        George/Bank Streets

iv)       Main South Road/Main Road Fairfield

v)        Musselburgh/Silverton Streets

vi)       South Road (links Central Dunedin to the Tunnels Trail)

vii)      Factory/Bush Road (links central Mosgiel to the Tunnels Trail)

·        Tunnels Trail – build an off-road trail that links Dunedin with the outer suburbs and Mosgiel via two disused rail tunnels. The Tunnels trail is 15km long and is relatively flat. The Tunnels trail begins on Factory Road, follows the rail alignment past the Wingatui racecourse using an existing track and enters the Chain Hills Tunnel off Gladstone Road North. The trail exits the Caversham Tunnel onto an existing shared path on Barnes Drive that links to South Road.

·        North East Valley Cycleway – upgrade cycle facilities on North Road to provide a higher level of service and improve safety and user experience.

Related Projects

12        In addition to the Arterials, Tunnels Trail and North East Valley cycleway projects, DCC is addressing other gaps in the SCN that are identified in the 2018 DUC programme by:

a)         Improving walking and cycling safety and accessibility through the Shaping Future Dunedin Transport (SFDT) Princes Street Bus Priority and Corridor Safety project.

b)        Improving walking and cycling safety and accessibility on the shared path from Wharf Street to St Andrew Street through the SFDT Harbour Arterial project.

c)         Improving access for people walking and cycling to the Tertiary Precinct by providing a connection from the Water of Leith bridge and one-way cycle lanes (on State Highway 1) through the SFDT Central Cycle and Pedestrian Improvements – Albany Street project.

13        Waka Kotahi also completed a Heartland Ride between Dunedin and Waihola in 2021.  ‘Heartland Rides’ are predominantly on-road cycle routes which link Great Rides with towns and cities to form a well connected New Zealand Cycle Network (NZCN).  The Dunedin and Waihola ride consists of wayfinding signage on quiet roads to connect riders completing the Clutha Gold Trail finishing at Waihola (currently under construction) to Mosgiel. 

14        The DUC programme and SFDT projects (as approved in the 10 Year Plan 2021-31) have been included in the Otago Southland Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2021-27, and in the National Land Transport Plan (NLTP) 2021-24, which makes them eligible for Waka Kotahi co-funding.

DISCUSSION

15        Two challenges for cyclists in Dunedin relate to the real and perceived road safety risk, and the lack of a coherent, accessible network. Progressing the Dunedin cycleway network addresses these challenges and creates the benefits of safe, healthier travel options, improved transport equity for those who are unable to drive or own a vehicle, and economic growth, particularly through regional tourism.

16        Single Stage Business Cases (SSBC) have been completed for two of the three DUC projects, namely Arterials and Tunnels Trail. The SSBCs indicate a total cost of $41.8m to deliver both projects, consisting of $18m for the Arterials project and $23.8m to deliver the Tunnels Trail.

17        In addition, $3.5m is required to complete the Harbour Link project. The Harbour Link will connect the Peninsula Connection shared path to the shared path alongside SH88 to Port Chalmers.

18        The SSBC for the North East Valley cycleway has not been completed.  SSBCs for the SFDT projects began in early 2022.

19        The focus of this report is on the Tunnels Trail and Arterials projects as they are well advanced in the planning stages.  These cycleway projects play a role in progressing an integrated and safe cycle network that connects Dunedin suburbs to the CBD.  Attachment C provides further detail on how these projects connect to the existing and planned cycleway networks.  

20        The Tunnels Trail will also facilitate connection to the regional cycle network, via the Heartland Ride between Dunedin and Waihola.  In time, this Dunedin to Waihola connection will provide links to other regional recreational cycle trails such as the Clutha Gold Trail, through to the Lake Dunstan Trail and the Otago Central Rail Trail.

21        Because the Tunnels Trail will play a role in both the city and regional cycle networks, Waka Kotahi have indicated that the Tunnels Trail is more likely to receive co-funding from the 2021-2024 NLTP.  Waka Kotahi assessed the Arterials project as a lower priority and therefore co-funding is less certain in the 2021-24 NLTP.

22        Two of the Arterials Project routes, South Road and Factory Road, are required to ensure the Tunnels Trail project connects the Dunedin CBD to Mosgiel.  The South Road Arterial route provides cycle lanes on South Road between Barnes Drive and Princes Street, while the Factory Road Arterial route provides cycle lanes on Factory Road and Bush Road between Wingatui Road and Aitken Place. These Arterial Project cycleways are estimated to cost $2.6m and $3.4m respectively.

23        The Tunnels Trail project will also integrate with the SFDT Mosgiel and Burnside Park and Ride locations, providing another travel option for people commuting from the south/south-west of the central city. These parking facilities could serve people wanting to park and use the cycleway to access the central city. 

Dunedin Urban Cycleways Budget

24        The DUC budget in the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 is $21.9m, split across the 10 years.

25        $45.3m is required to deliver the Tunnels Trail and Arterials cycleways and complete the Harbour Link project.  Given the budget shortfall identified by the SSBC process, there is a need to prioritise the projects or increase the budget. 

OPTIONS

26        Planning work has shown that the Tunnels Trail delivers more benefits compared to the Arterials project and it is more likely to receive Waka Kotahi co-funding.    

27        The business case process has also shown that the DUC budget in the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 is insufficient to deliver the entire DUC programme.  As a consequence of the DUC budget shortfalls, staff recommend Council consider the Tunnels Trial and elements of the Arterials project be progressed to delivery. 

28        Staff recommend that Council reconsider the remaining projects; North East Valley cycleway, Arterial routes, and the final portion of the Peninsula Connection project (noting that the final section of the Peninsula Connection between Portobello and Harwood remains unfunded by Waka Kotahi) as part of the next 10 Year Plan 2024-34.

29        There are two options presented in this report to progress projects within the DUC programme:

1.         Amend the timing of the existing DUC budget within the 2021-31 10 Year Plan to deliver a section of the Tunnels Trail (Abbotsford to Dunedin Central) and the Arterial route that links to it (South Road).

2.         Amend the timing and approve $11.4m of additional DUC programme capital budget to deliver the Tunnels Trail project and the two Arterial routes that link to it (South Road and Factory Road).

Option One – Amend the timing of existing DUC budgets and deliver a section of the Tunnel Trail from Abbotsford to Barnes Drive

30        Option One proposes to amend the timing of the 2021-31 10 Year Plan DUC budget to deliver part of the Tunnels Trail from Abbotsford School to Barnes Drive and the Arterial route on South Road in the next three years. This would include detailed design, land purchase and consenting work for the whole of the Tunnels Trail with the remainder of the budget considered in the next 10 Year Plan 2024-2034.

31        The work to complete this section of the Tunnels Trail and the South Road Arterial route would cost approximately $18.4m.

32        The budget table below shows there is no change to the total 10 Year Plan 2021-31 budget, however, the timing of the spend is accelerated.  This leaves no DUC budget in years 2026/27 – 31 to complete further cycleway projects. The amended timing for Option One is shown in Attachment A - Table One. 

Total Budget

10 Year 2021-31  Total

10 Year Plan 2021-31

21,925

Proposed

21,925

Variance

               -

 

33        The individual project budgets for Option One are presented in the table below. The amended timing for the Option One project spends is shown in Attachment A - Table Two.  

Project Breakdown

Budget Total

Harbour Link

3,500

Tunnel Trail

15,837

Arterials (South Road)

2,588

Total

21,925

 

34        The Waka Kotahi funding subsidy for Option One is shown in the table below.  The amended timing of the Option 1 Waka Kotahi funding over the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 is shown in Attachment A - Table Three.

Funding

10 Year 2021-31  Total

10 Year Plan 2021-31

 

Waka Kotahi Subsidy

11,212

DCC share

10,713

 

 

Proposed Budget

 

Waka Kotahi Subsidy

11,299

DCC share

10,626

 

 

Variance

 

Waka Kotahi Subsidy

87

DCC share

(87)

 

Advantages

·        This option can be delivered within the existing 10 Year Plan 2021-31 budget.

·        The cycleway will link to the Burnside Park and Ride, providing an opportunity for people wanting to park and use the cycleway to access the central city.

·        The project will improve cycling safety and accessibility, providing people with travel choices.

·        The projects support the Council’s Carbon Zero by 2030 goal, and the 40% active mode share goal from the ITS.

·        A section of the network will be delivered providing a flat and integrated active transport link between Dunedin CBD and Green Island and Abbotsford.

Disadvantages

·        Gaps in the existing Dunedin city cycleway network to be delivered under by the Arterials project will not be addressed.

·        Mosgiel will continue to be disconnected from the Dunedin cycle network.

·        There is a risk the project will not be eligible for Waka Kotahi co-funding from the National Land Transport Plan 2021-24 if DCC has not committed to fund the entire project.  The Tunnels Trail SSBC will need to be reconsidered to determine if delivering only a section of the project will produce a positive benefit cost ratio (e.g. as it will not provide a connection to the regional cycle trails).

·        There is no DUC budget in years 2026/27 – 31 to complete further cycleway projects.

Option Two – Amend the timing and approve an $11.4m increase to DUC budget to deliver the Tunnels Trail from Mosgiel to Dunedin

35        Option Two proposes to amend the timing and increase the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 DUC budget by $11.4m.  This budget increase would provide sufficient funding to deliver the Tunnels Trail project and the two Arterials projects (South Road and Factory Road) that connect it to Dunedin CDB and Mosgiel Centre. 

36        The budget table below shows there is a $11.4m increase to the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 budget.  The timing of the spend has also been accelerated.  This leaves no DUC budget in years 2026/27 – 31 to complete further cycleway projects. The amended timing for the Option Two 10 Year Plan 2021-31 budget is shown in Attachment A - Table Four:

Total Budget

10 Year 2021-31 Total

10 Year Plan 2021-31

21,925

Proposed

33,318

Variance

11,393

 

37        The individual project budgets for Option Two are presented in the table below. The amended timing for the Option Two project spends is shown in Attachment A - Table Five.

Project breakdown

Budget Total

 Harbour Link

3,500

Tunnel Trail

23,800

Arterials (South Road & Factory Road)

6,018

Total

33,318

 

38        The Waka Kotahi funding subsidy for Option Two is shown in the table below.  The amended timing of the Option 2 Waka Kotahi funding over the 10 Year Plan 2021-31 is shown in Attachment A - Table Six:

Funding

10 Year 2021-31 Total

10 Year Plan 2021-31

 

Waka Kotahi Subsidy

11,212

DCC share

10,713

 

 

Proposed Budget

 

Waka Kotahi Subsidy

17,109

DCC share

16,209

 

 

Variance

 

Waka Kotahi Subsidy

5,897

DCC share

5,496

 

Advantages

·        Creates a coherent end to end cycleway, providing a flat and integrated active transport link between Dunedin CBD and Mosgiel Centre.

·        The cycleway will integrate with the Mosgiel and Burnside Park and Rides, providing an opportunity for people wanting to park and use the cycleway to access the central city.

·        The project will improve cycling safety and accessibility, providing people with travel choices; and supports Council’s Carbon Zero by 2030 goal, and the 40% mode share goal from the ITS.

·        Waka Kotahi co-funding from the National Land Transport Plan 2021-24 is more likely because the Tunnels Trail will be integrated with the regional and national cycleway network.

Disadvantages

·        Additional capital budget is required to deliver this option with an associated increase in opex cost to cover interest payments.

·        Gaps in the existing Dunedin city cycleway network to be delivered under by the Arterials project will not be addressed.

·        There is no DUC budget in years 2026/27 – 31 to complete further cycleway projects.

NEXT STEPS

39        If option one is approved the Roading and Footpath capital budget will be updated for the May 2022 Annual Plan Council meeting to reflect the amended timing.

40        If option two is approved the Roading and Footpath capital budget will be updated for the May 2022 Annual Plan Council meeting to reflect the amended timing and increase in budget.

41        Staff will provide a report to Council for the 10 Year Plan 2024-2027 meeting to consider funding for the remaining projects to complete the DUC programme (North East Valley cycleway, Arterials project and Peninsula Connection).

 

Signatories

Author:

Jeanine Benson - Group Manager Transport

Authoriser:

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Budget Options Tables

181

b

Programme 8 Dunedin Cycle Projects

185

c

Dunedin Cycle Projects

186

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the social, economic and environmental well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The DUC programme will deliver on multiple strategic priorities included in the Spatial Plan, Integrated Transport Strategy, Parks and Recreation Strategy, Carbon Zero 2030, and Te Ao Turoa.

Māori Impact Statement

DCC have been working with Aukaha and will continue to do so throughout the development of the DUC projects.

Sustainability

The projects will be contributing to the Carbon Net Zero by 2030 goal, and the 40% mode share goal from the ITS.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The DUC programme is included in the 2021 – 31 10 Year Plan.  This report presents options to alter the budget.

Financial considerations

The financial implications depend on the option chosen, and are covered in the body of the report.

Significance

Both options presented in this report are considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

The Tunnels Trail and Arterials projects have undergone external engagement through the business case process through multiple workshops and individual meetings.   Further external engagement will be undertaken to inform the final detailed design. The Dunedin Tunnels Trails Trust are project partners and have been involved throughout the project.

Engagement - internal

The Tunnels Trail and Arterials projects have included engagement with Parks and Recreation, 3 Waters, Events and Community Development, Marketing and Communications, City Development, and Enterprise Dunedin.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The Dunedin Tunnels Trail project preferred route is located within the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board boundary and nearby the Saddle Hill Community Board boundary. Representatives from both Community Boards have been included as a key stakeholder throughout the business case development. The Transport team provide regular updates to the Mosgiel-Taieri Community Board about the Project.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

 



Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

 



Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Galleries, Libraries and Museums

Department: Executive Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Galleries, Libraries and Museums Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        Dunedin Public Art Gallery (DPAG)

·        Dunedin Public Libraries

·        Olveston

·        Otago Museum Levy

·        Toitū Otago Settlers Museum (Toitū), including the Lan Yuan Dunedin Chinese Garden (Lan Yuan)

·        Ara Toi

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Galleries, Libraries and Museums Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Galleries, Libraries and Museums as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for this Group has increased by $1.206 million, 4.9%.

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

4          Personnel costs have increased $358k, 3.5%.  This includes additional resources to meet rostering obligations for DPAG and Toitū.

Grants and Subsidies

5          Grants and Subsidies costs have increased by $399k.

6          Otago Museum funding is increased by $369k to $4.904 million for the following:

·     $91k being a 2% adjustment to the base levy,

·     $103k funding allowance to enable the Otago Museum to pay the living wage, and

·     $175k one-off grant towards a seismic survey of the Otago Museum facility.

7          All but the living wage increase was provided for in the 10 year plan.  Work has been undertaken with the Otago Museum, and as a result the draft budget allows the Otago Museum to pay the living wage to its staff, in line with DCC policy.

Depreciation

8          Depreciation has increased by $287k, mainly due to the capital expenditure programme.

FEES and charges

9          Fees and charges are broadly in line with the 10 year plan, but with some variations to reflect actual costs. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Galleries, libraries and museums draft budget for 2022/23

191

b

Galleries, libraries and museums draft fees and charges for 2022/23

192

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Galleries, Libraries and Museums Group activities primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Galleries, Libraries and Museums Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Galleries, Libraries and Museums Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Community and Planning

Department: Executive Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Community and Planning Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        City Development

·        Resource Consents

·        Community Development and Events

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Community and Planning Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Community and Planning as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

operating budgets

Revenue

Rates

3          The rates contribution for the Group has increased by $790k, 6.2%.

External Revenue

4          External revenue has decreased by $475k.  The main revenue changes incorporate the following:

a)         Reductions of $382k from International Cricket Council’s contribution towards the Women’s World Cup 2022 (ICC WWC 2022) and $180k from Masters Games cost recoveries.

b)        Increases in Resource Consents revenue $60k and cost recovery from FIFA $25k.

Expenditure

Personnel Costs

5          Personnel costs have increased by $428k, 7.1%, due to additional resources in Resource Consents and Community Development and Events teams.

Consumables and general costs

6          Consumables and general costs have decreased by $244k.   This is primarily due to a decrease for ICC WWC 2022.

Grants and Subsidies

7          Grants and subsidies have increased $195k, primarily due to increases in rates grants, and the adjustments approved as part of the 10 year plan.

FEES and charges

8          Resource Consents fees are unchanged except for the Site Contamination Search fees which have increased to better reflect cost. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Community and planning draft budget for 2022/23

198

b

Community and planning draft fees and charges for 2022/23

199

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The activities of the Community and Planning Group primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Community and Planning Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Community and Planning Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Additional Support for Task Force Green

Department: Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The report presents options for additional support for the Task Force Green scheme following a request from Council in May 2021.

2          Two options are presented for consideration: increasing the value of vouchers and/or increasing the number of volunteers.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers options for additional support for the Task Force Green scheme.

 

BACKGROUND

 

Moved (Cr Jules Radich/Mayor Aaron Hawkins):

That the Council:

 

Request a report on Taskforce Green and options for possible additional support in time for the Annual Plan 2022/23.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2021/117)

 

3          At the 31 May 10 Year Plan Meeting, the following resolution was made by Council:

4          This report responds to that resolution. 

DISCUSSION

What Task Force Green Does

5          In 2020/21 Task Force Green volunteers worked for 24,000 hours (approximately 14,000 for Council and 10,000 for community organisations).  Based on minimum wage, volunteers provided $190,000 in labour to community-based organisations and $270,000 in labour to the Council. 

6          Volunteers undertook mainly environmental work e.g. maintenance of walkways, native bush, public domains, cemeteries and recreational areas, and graffiti removal from public buildings and spaces.  Assistance to Council departments included installing signage, delivering notices, providing cleans ups, weed management, and minor maintenance.  Volunteers also worked for clubs and non-profit organisations (mostly one-off activities like property clean ups).

How DCC Currently Supports Task Force Green

7          Since the 1980s the DCC has supported Task Force Green and the employment schemes preceding it.  Through the schemes both the long-term unemployed and those yet to start work, gained work skills and, in some cases, paid employment.

8          Since 2013 the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) has subsidised the employment of six fixed-term Task Force Green Supervisors.  In the past five years, an estimated 120 Task Force Green participants (supervisors and volunteers) moved into paid work (part-time, seasonal, or full-time).

9          In July 2013 the DCC introduced supermarket vouchers to acknowledge the work of Task Force Green volunteers and in part provide a contribution towards incidental costs after central government stopped its benefit top up to participants.

10        Vouchers are provided each week to eligible volunteers (those participating in the scheme a minimum of three days per week). Participants referred from Corrections for Community Service, or from MSD for re-compliance, don’t receive vouchers.

11        Since 2013 the vouchers have been provided to volunteers for 50 weeks per year. For 2022/23 this has been increased to 52 weeks per year and incorporated into the draft budgets.

12        Staff considered what additional support could be provided for Task Force Green, and present two options, increasing the value of supermarket vouchers provided (direct support to volunteers) and/or increasing volunteer numbers.

Direct Additional Support to Volunteers

13        There is no perfect mechanism for assessing any increase to voucher value. However, it would be appropriate to index and increase the buying power of vouchers to reflect increased costs. 

14        In providing this option staff have taken into account increases in overall living costs and utilised the ‘general’ consumers price index (CPI) which measures the changing price of a fixed basket of goods and services purchased by New Zealand households.  The aim of the CPI is to measure price changes of the same sample of products at each outlet over time.

15        Since July 2013 the Jobseeker weekly benefit payment for a single person aged over 25 years has risen by $70.19.  Work and Income also provides a Winter Energy payment to all beneficiaries from May to October, including Task Force Green volunteers.

16        According to the Reserve Bank of New Zealand inflation calculator, the equivalent value of a $20 voucher from Q3 2013 is now $23.10, if increased using ‘general’ CPI (Q3 2021).  If the ‘food’ CPI is used, the value would be $22.91.

17        A core group of volunteers, who for health or other reasons, cannot move into paid work and therefore regularly attend the scheme, would gain the most from an increase in voucher value.  All are beneficiaries, with about half receiving the Jobseeker benefit.  The remainder receive other Work and Income benefits.

18        In 2022/23, $31,200 is budgeted for supermarket vouchers for up to 30 volunteers.  The table below sets out examples of potential increases.

Voucher Value

Number of Volunteers

Value Per Volunteer/Annum

Annual Budget Cost

Current $20

30

$1040

$31,200

$25

30

$1300

$39,000

$30

30

$1560

$46,800

Increasing Volunteers to Support Work Outcomes and Community Groups

19        Up to 40 volunteers per week participate in the Task Force Green scheme.  Around 30 are regular participants with others attending for re-compliance or Community Service.

20        Supervisors are Work and Income clients, or volunteers already on the scheme who gain additional work skills by taking on the paid role.  Supervisors oversee five volunteers at any one time with volunteer numbers capped.  Capping ensures adequate supervision and support is provided to people who are primarily not work ready.

21        MSD subsidises Supervisor wages under its Flexi Wage Scheme ($10,400 per Supervisor). Supervisors can only work a maximum of 26 weeks per year and be re-employed once every 18 months.  A current challenge is the fixed-term nature of the role with upskilling supervisors often taking the full six-month work-term.

22        A DCC-funded Team Leader oversees the scheme, manages supervisors, leads training, health and safety compliance, work scheduling and provides significant pastoral support to all participants.  The Team Leader also manages external relationships with MSD and Corrections for those undertaking re-compliance. 

23        The Council could consider expanding the scheme with 10 extra volunteers (from 40 up to 50).  This would provide more people who are long-term unemployed with upskilling, as well as additional assistance for community organisations.  However, more resourcing would have to be provided for both volunteers and supervisors if this occurred, along with practical resources i.e. safety equipment and training. 

24        The Team Leader would require further support in the form of a full-time Task Force Green Assistant if the scheme expanded. The role would have to be DCC funded but would support both supervisors and volunteers and take sole charge of the scheme when required.  There are risks in expanding the programme without this type of resource as the Team Leader is working at capacity.

25        The table below sets out forecast costs for 2022/23 if the Council decided to accept 10 new Task Force Green volunteers and approve establishment of a Task Force Green Assistant role.

 

 

Budget Items

Forecast Increase to Task Force Green Budget 2022/23

Employment-related costs, Task Force Green Assistant (permanent, full-time)

$64,500

Volunteer Allowance
$20 x 10 volunteers @52 weeks per year

$10,400

Operational, maintenance and consumables

$23,875

Total Increase in 2022/23 Budget

$98,775

OPTIONS

Option OneIncrease the value of vouchers provided to eligible Task Force Green volunteers by an agreed amount from 1 July 2022

Advantages

·        The increase provides direct assistance to volunteers to help meet weekly living costs.

·        The increase acknowledges the volunteer work undertaken by Task Force Green volunteers for the Council and community.

Disadvantages

·        Any increase is unbudgeted.

Option Two – Increase volunteer numbers by up to 10 per annum.

This option requires the employment of a Task Force Green Assistant which is required to manage volunteers. However, due to low unemployment there is a risk that there may be a limited number of extra volunteers to manage.

Advantages

·        Provides additional support for the DCC and community organisations to receive assistance through the scheme.

·        Provides upskilling for the long-term unemployed and people yet to enter the workforce. 

Disadvantages

·        Potential low number of extra volunteers. 

·        Any increase is unbudgeted.

Option Three – Status Quo

26        Continue to provide $20 supermarket vouchers to volunteers under the current eligibility criteria.

Advantages

·        Support continues for volunteers on the programme.

Disadvantages

·        The value of vouchers has remained unchanged since 2013 and does not reflect increases in the cost of living.

NEXT STEPS

27        Staff will action any decisions made by Council.

 

Signatories

Author:

Joy Lanini - Manager Community Development and Events

Authoriser:

Simon Pickford - General Manager Community Services

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities and promotes the social and economic well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Māori Impact Statement

A number of Task Force Green identify as Māori.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Depending on the decision of Council, there may be implications for the Task Force Green budget.

Financial considerations

In 2022/23, $31,200 is budgeted for supermarket vouchers for up to 30 volunteers.

Significance

This decision is considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

Discussion has been held with MSD, who are supportive of both options but can provide no additional funding.

Engagement - internal

There has been discussion with Finance.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Task Force Green volunteers work across all Community Boards areas.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Annual Plan Budget Update - Economic Development

Department: Enterprise Dunedin

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides an overview of the operating expenditure (opex) budgets for the 2022/23 Annual Plan year for the Economic Development Group.  The following activities are provided for:

·        Economic Development

·        Dunedin Visitors Centre – i Site

·        Marketing Dunedin

2          A schedule of proposed fees and charges for the 2022/23 year is also presented at Attachment B.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft 2022/23 operating budget for the Economic Development Group as shown/amended at Attachment A.

b)     Approves the draft 2022/23 fees and charges schedules for Economic Development as shown/amended at Attachment B.

 

operating budgets

3          Apart from a transfer of costs to another activity, the budgets are in line with the 10 year plan. 

FEES and charges

4          Film permit fees are increasing by 15% to include GST.

 

Signatories

Author:

John Christie - Manager Enterprise Dunedin

Authoriser:

John Christie - Manager Enterprise Dunedin

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Economic development draft budget for 2022/23

212

b

Economic development draft fees and charges for 2022/23

213

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The Economic Development Group activities primarily contribute to the objectives and priorities of the above strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

The Annual Plan is not proposing any changes to that provided for in the 10 year plan.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed and considered in the 50 year Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy of the current 10 year plan 2021-31.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report provides a draft budget for the Economic Development Group for inclusion in the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

Financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets as discussed in this report are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in updating the draft budget for the Economic Development Group.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across council have been involved in the development of the draft budget.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Projects identified in Community Board Plans were considered in the development of the budgets for the 10 year plan, and Community Boards were consulted at this time.  Community Boards will have an opportunity to present on the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

2022-23 Rating Method

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The draft budget as presented for 2022-23 proposes an overall increase in rates of 6.5%. This increase in rates is collected using the rating method. The proposed rates charged to individual rate accounts incorporate the budget increase and changes in the rating database.

2          The proposed changes to the rating method are discussed in this report. These include increases to the community services targeted rate (increase of 1.47%) and the stadium differentiated rates (increase of 1.4%).

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council, for the purposes of the draft budget:

 

a)         Approves an increase in the community services targeted rate for the 2022-23 year of $1.50 to $103.50 including GST.

b)        Approves an increase in the Stadium 10,000 plus seat differentiated rates for the 2022‑23 year based on the June 2021 Local Government Cost Index of 1.4%.

c)         Approves the current rating method for the setting of all other rates for the 2022-23 year.

 

background

3          The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the impact of the proposed rate increase by property and property category for the 2022-23 year and confirm the proposed changes to the rating method.

4          Please note that unless specified, all rating figures in this report are GST inclusive.

DISCUSSION

5          The overall increase in rates to be collected is driven by the draft budget for 2022-23 which proposes a 6.5% increase. This increase in rates is collected using the rating method.

6          The rating method comprises two main elements, general rates and targeted rates, as demonstrated on Attachment A. Attachment A provides a summary of current and proposed rates, provides details of the individual rates and the amount collected from each rate. Attachment B, summary information, provides a summary of fixed charges, general rates and total rates.

Community Services Rate

7          The Council has a community services targeted rate (CSTR) which funds the Botanic Garden and part of the Parks and Reserves activity. The CSTR is a fixed charge on all rateable properties and is normally increased annually by an indexed amount.  Allowing for an increase based on the June 2021 Local Government Cost Index (LGCI) of 1.4% would increase this from $102.00 to $103.50 for the 2022-23 year.

Stadium Rates

8          The Council has a rating differential for the Stadium for the general rate, the economic development/tourism rate, the capital value based drainage rate and the capital value based fire protection rate. Since the 2013-14 year, the differentiated Stadium rates have been inflation adjusted annually. For the 2022-23 year, it is proposed to increase these rates by the June 2021 LGCI of 1.4%.

Overall Impact

9          The following table shows the overall rates income (including GST) by property category for 2021-22 and 2022-23.

Category

2021-22

($’000)

2022-23

($’000)

$ change

($’000)

% change

Residential

134,227

142,762

8,535

6.4%

Lifestyle

6,701

7,124

423

6.3%

Commercial

60,000

64,069

4,069

6.8%

Farmland

5,065

5,427

362

7.2%

Total

205,993

219,382

13,389

6.5%

 

10        Attachment C provides sample property rate changes for each category of property. The sample property rate changes incorporate:

·    The forecast rate increase of 6.5%,

·    An increase of 1.47%, $1.50 in the community services rate, and

·    An increase of 1.4% in the differentiated rates paid by the Stadium.

Rate Maximum

11        Under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, certain rates must not exceed 30% of total rates revenue.  This includes the use of a uniform annual general charge and any targeted rates that are set on a uniform basis excluding targeted rates set solely for water supply or sewage disposal.  Based on the draft budgets, these rates represent 21% of total rates revenue.

OPTIONS

12        No options are provided as this report is giving effect to the current rating method and previous decisions of the Council.

NEXT STEPS

13        While the Council is engaging with the community on the annual plan 2022/23, rate account information will be available on the DCC website that shows the proposed rating impact by individual rate account.

 

Signatories

Author:

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Chief Financial Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Summary of Current and Proposed Rates

219

b

Summary Information

220

c

Sample Rate Accounts

221

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and promotes the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The annual plan 2022-23 contributes to objectives across the strategic framework, as it describes the Council’s activities, which are aligned to community outcomes. It also provides a long-term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

Council budgets impact broadly across all Dunedin communities including Māori. The Council  is committed to developing ongoing relationships with Māori communities, particularly with mana whenua. Strategic projects that have significance to Māori have been identified from across the organisation and these projects will work collaboratively with the Maori Partnerships Manager to ensure beneficial outcomes for Māori are achieved.

Sustainability

Sustainability is an underlying principle of the DCC’s strategic framework. Activity in the annual plan 2022-23 supports the DCC to embed the principles of sustainability across DCC work.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The rating method gives effect to the draft budget. The financial implications of the draft budget are discussed in annual plan 2022-23 overview report and the group budget reports.  The application of the rating method is consistent with the 10 year plan 2021-2031.

Financial considerations

The rating method gives effect to the draft budget. The financial implications of the draft budget are discussed in annual plan 2022-23 overview report and the group budget reports.

Significance

The 10 year plan 2021-31 budgets, including the rating method, were considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, and were consulted on.  Variations to those budgets and rating method are not considered significant in terms of the policy.  

Engagement – external

There will be an opportunity for the community to provide feedback during the engagement process.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the draft budgets.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The rating method will be of interest to Community Boards.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Assistance to Ratepayers on Limited or Fixed Incomes

Department: Corporate Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          In response to a request from Council, this report discusses the options available for providing assistance to ratepayers on limited or fixed incomes.

2          As this is a report for noting, there are no options or summary of considerations.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the Assistance to Ratepayers on Limited or Fixed Incomes report.

 

BACKGROUND

3          At its meeting on 27 January 2021, when considering the 2021-22 Rating Method report, Council resolved the following:

Moved (Cr Jim O'Malley/Mayor Aaron Hawkins):

That the Council:

Requests that staff prepare a report in time for consideration as part of the 2022-23 Annual Plan on options for providing assistance to ratepayers on limited or fixed income.

Motion carried (CNL/2021/001)

DISCUSSION

4          The options currently available for providing assistance to ratepayers are discussed below.

Rates Rebate Scheme

5          This central government funded scheme run by the Department of Internal Affairs, provides ratepayers with a rates rebate.  The level of the rebate depends on a combination of income received, the amount of rates charged, and the number of dependants that the ratepayer may have.  In 2021/22 the maximum rebate that can be received is $665.

6          The DCC provides information on the scheme at the time that rate assessments are sent out to ratepayers.  The DCC website also provides information on the scheme, along with a link to the government’s application form and entitlement calculator.  The criteria for applying for the rates rebate scheme for 2021/22 is at Attachment A.

7          Staff could investigate ways to increase the level of publicity of this rebate scheme.

Direct debit

8          Payment of rates by direct debit is available to all ratepayers.  Rates can be paid either weekly, fortnightly, monthly or on the instalment due dates.  Paying by direct debit enables rate payments to be spread throughout the year, with smaller for frequent payments easier to manage than four larger instalment payments.  With direct debit payments in place, no late payment penalties apply. 

Rate remission and postponement policy

9          Council’s Rate Remission and Postponement Policy (the Policy) is intended to help ratepayers, particularly those on fixed income, to continue living in their homes when they are experiencing financial hardship that is affecting their ability to pay rates.  A copy of the Policy is at Attachment B.

10        The Policy allows both the remission of rates and the postponement of rates for extreme financial hardship.

11        Financial hardship means the ratepayer is unlikely to have sufficient funds after the payment of rates for the care of any dependents, reasonable living expenses, health care, and provision for the maintenance of their home and chattels. 

12        Remission of rates is limited to an amount of up to one rate instalment, being a quarter of the annual rates charged on the property.

13        Postponement of rates is the most common mechanism used by Councils to assist ratepayers.  DCC’s Policy provides that rate payments may be postponed for a ratepayer after an application is received and personal circumstances are assessed.  Postponement of rates may be for up to 100% of rates, and any postponement will continue to apply until the earliest of:

·    the death of the ratepayer; or

·    the ratepayer ceases to be the owner or occupier of the rating unit; or

·    the ratepayer(s) cease to use the property as his/her residence; or

·    a date specified by the DCC; or

·    at the ratepayer’s request.

14        All postponed rates are registered as a statutory land charge on the rating unit title, and Council may charge an annual fee to cover its administrative and financial costs, over the period that the rates are postponed. 

15        The current policy requires ratepayers to demonstrate that they do not have the financial capacity to pay their rates, or the payment of rates would create financial hardship. 

NEXT STEPS

16        Staff will investigate ways to promote further the Government Rebate Scheme. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Sharon Bodeker - Corporate Planner

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Chief Financial Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Criterial for Rates Rebate Scheme 2021/22

226

b

Rates Remission and Postponement Policy

227

  


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

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Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

 

Proposed Event Road Closures for February 2022

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The DCC received temporary road closure applications for the following events:

·        Basketball Tournament, The Octagon Central Carriageway.

·        Motorsport Hillclimb, Scroggs Hill Road.

 

2          This report recommends that the Council approves the temporary closure of the roads concerned.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Resolves to close the roads detailed below, pursuant to Section 319, Section 342, and Schedule 10 clause 11(e) of the Local Government Act 1974:

i)         Basketball Tournament, The Octagon Central Carriageway

Sunday, 20 February 2022, 6:30am until 5:00pm:

·        The Octagon Central Carriageway.

ii)        Motorsport Hillclimb, Scroggs Hill Road

Sunday, 20 February 2022, 9:00am until 5:00pm:

·        Scroggs Hill Road, from 85 Scroggs Hill Road to the intersection with Bush Reserve Road.  

 

BACKGROUND

3          Events and festivals contribute vibrancy and uniqueness to Dunedin, creating economic opportunities for the city and reflecting and enhancing social, recreational, environmental, and cultural well-being. Strategies and plans reflect the contribution events make to the city’s vision of being one of the world’s great small cities including the Social Well-being Strategy, the Economic Development Strategy, Ara Toi Ōtepoti, Parks and Recreation Strategy, and the Festival and Events Plan 2018-2023. 

4          The area proposed to be used for these events is legal road and can therefore be temporarily closed to normal traffic if the statutory temporary road closure procedures are followed. These procedures are set out in Section 319 of the LGA 1974 which gives Council the power to stop or close any road or part of a road in the manner and upon the conditions set out in section 342 and Schedule 10 of the LGA 1974.  Schedule 10 is included as attachment A. These conditions include the following:

·        Consultation with Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) and the Police.

·        Public notice must be given of the intention to consider closing any road or part of a road, and notice given of the decision to close the road.

·        When closing under Schedule 10 section 11(e), the road cannot be closed more than 31 days in the aggregate in any one year.

·        Being satisfied that traffic is not likely to be unreasonably impeded.

5          Where the proposed temporary road stopping relates to public functions, the decision to close a road cannot be delegated to Council staff; a resolution of Council is required.

DISCUSSION

Consultation and Notification

6          The Police and Waka Kotahi have no objections to the proposed road closures.

7          On the 8th January 2022, the Otago Daily Times advertised the proposed temporary road closures (Attachment B).

8          An opportunity was provided to give feedback on the proposal by emailing tmp@dcc.govt.nz by a deadline of Saturday 15 January 2022.  No objections were received to the proposed road closures at the time of this report submission (13 January 2022).  Any objections received after the report submission, but prior to the deadline, will be tabled at the meeting.

9          Council is required to give public notice of its decision. This notice will be published after this meeting and prior to the event, if approved.

10        The event organisers for the events contacted those considered affected, i.e. those with immediate frontage to the roads concerned prior to submitting their application, and no objections were received.  

11        The 31-day limit mentioned in paragraph 4 will not be exceeded by the approval of the proposed temporary road closures.

 

 

Traffic Impacts 

12        The events have been held in prior years without causing unreasonable delays to the travelling public.  Emergency Services and Public transport services will be managed through the temporary traffic management process.

13        The temporary traffic management plan process will ensure that other issues such as temporary relocation of certain parking (e.g. taxi, mobility and AVO) are addressed.

14        Note that for Scroggs Hill Road the road will be opened intermittently to allow resident access.

OPTIONS

15        Recommendations in this report cannot be amended without first carrying out further consultation with affected parties, Waka Kotahi, the Police, and verifying that traffic impacts are acceptable.

Option One – Recommended Option

 

16        That the Council closes the sections of roads as detailed in the recommendation.

Advantages

·        The roads will be able to be closed and the events will be able to proceed.

·        The closure will enable the benefits (economic, social, and cultural) associated with events held in Dunedin.

Disadvantages

·        There will be temporary loss of vehicular access through the closed areas.  However, there are detours available nearby, and safety can be assured using temporary traffic management.

Option Two – Status Quo

17        That the Council decides not to close the roads in question.

Advantages

·        There would be no detour required for travelling public, and the road would be able to be used as normal.

Disadvantages

·        The events would not be able to go ahead, and the benefits of the events would be lost.

NEXT STEPS

18        Should the resolution be made to temporarily close the roads, Council staff will proceed to accept the temporary traffic management plan and notify the public of the closures.

 

Signatories

Author:

Michael Tannock - Transport Network Team Leader

Authoriser:

Simon Smith - Asset and Funding Manager

Jeanine Benson - Group Manager Transport

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Local Government Act 1974 Schedule 10

242

b

DCC Noticeboard 8 January 2022

245

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the social and economic well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Events contribute to the Strategic Framework.

Events contribute to the Economic Development Strategy, the Social Wellbeing Strategy.

There is a Festival and Events Plan 2018-2023.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for Māori.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.  The cost of the proposed road closures will be met within existing budgets.

Significance

This decision is considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been external engagement as required by the LGA 1974, with the Police and Waka Kotahi. Affected parties were notified and provided a time period for feedback.

Engagement - internal

There has been engagement with DCC Events, In-House Legal, and Transport.  There is support for the events to proceed.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks should the recommended resolution be made.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Annual Plan Council

31 January 2022

 

PDF Creator           


Council Annual Plan

31 January 2022

 

 

Resolution to Exclude the Public

 

 

That the Council Annual Plan excludes the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting (pursuant to the provisions of the Local