Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                                    Tuesday 28 November 2023 and Wednesday 29 November 2023

Time:                                                   9.00 am

Venue:                                                Council Chamber, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sandy Graham

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Jules Radich

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Cherry Lucas

 

 

Members

Cr Bill Acklin

Cr Sophie Barker

 

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Christine Garey

 

Cr Kevin Gilbert

Cr Carmen Houlahan

 

Cr Marie Laufiso

Cr Mandy Mayhem

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Lee Vandervis

 

Cr Steve Walker

Cr Brent Weatherall

 

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

 

Senior Officer                                               Sandy Graham, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer                  Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

Lynne Adamson

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

governance.support@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                                                                         PAGE

 

1             Opening                                                                                                                                                                       4

2             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                              4

3             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                    4

4             Confirmation of Agenda                                                                                                                                        4

5             Declaration of Interest                                                                                                                                           5

6             Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                                                    17

6.1       Ordinary Council meeting - 30 October 2023                                                                                 17  

Reports

7             Actions From Resolutions of Council Meetings                                                                                          41

8             Forward Work Programme for Council - November 2023                                                                      47

9             Petition                                                                                                                                                                      59

10           South Dunedin Future - Programme Strategy Update                                                                             65

11           National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making - Submission                               79

12           Right of Way Easement over part Dunedin Town Belt for 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin        93

13           Residents' Opinion Survey Quarterly Update: July - September 2023 quarter                            109

14           Customer and Regulatory Issues and Trends Report                                                                             117

15           Proposed Event Road Closures - December 2023 to March 2024                                                     123

16           Funding Options - Kerbside Collection Service                                                                                         134

17           2024 New Zealand Masters Games Operational and Financial Update                                          141

18           General Rate Differentials                                                                                                                                147

19           10 Year Plan - Early engagement feedback                                                                                               162

20           Financial Result - Period Ended 30 September 2023                                                                             324

21           Waipori Fund - Quarter Ending September 2023                                                                                    345

22           Meeting Schedule for 2024                                                                                                                             350

Notice of Motion

23           Notice of Motion                                                                                                                                                 355        

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                                                                     358

 


Council

28 November 2023

 

1          Opening

The Very Rev’d Dr Tony Curtis SCP, Dean of Dunedin, St Pauls Cathedral will open the meeting with a prayer.

2          Public Forum

At the close of the agenda public forum registrations were still being taken.  The speakers will be confirmed following closure of registrations at 10.00 am on Monday, 27 November 2023.

3          Apologies

An apology has been received from Mayor Jules Radich.

 

That the Council:

 

Accepts the apology from Mayor Jules Radich.

4          Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Council

28 November 2023

 

Declaration of Interest

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.         Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

2.         Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

3.         Staff members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable.

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)        Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

c)         Notes the proposed management plan for the Executive Leadership Team’s Interests.

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Councillor Interest Register

6

b

Executive Leadership Team Interest Register

15

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 










Council

28 November 2023

 


 


Council

28 November 2023

 

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council meeting - 30 October 2023

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 30 October 2023 as a correct record.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

A

Minutes of Ordinary Council meeting  held on 30 October 2023

18

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 

 

 

Council

MINUTES

 

Minutes of an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council held in the Council Chamber, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, The Octagon, Dunedin on Monday 30 October 2023, commencing at 9.00 am

 

PRESENT

 

Mayor

Mayor Jules Radich

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Cherry Lucas                              

 

 

Members

Cr Bill Acklin

Cr Sophie Barker

 

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Christine Garey

 

Cr Kevin Gilbert

Cr Carmen Houlahan

 

Cr Marie Laufiso

Cr Mandy Mayhem

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Lee Vandervis

 

Cr Steve Walker

Cr Brent Weatherall

 

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

Sandy Graham (Chief Executive Officer), Robert West (General Manager Corporate and Quality), Jeanette Wikaira (Acting General Manager Community Services), David Ward (Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development), John Christie (Manager Enterprise Dunedin), Leanne Mash (Communications and City Marketing Manager), Manahautū (General Manager Māori Partnerships and Policy)(Acting), Mark Mawdsley (Team Leader Advisory Services), Zoe Lunniss (Biodiversity Advisor), Jonathan Rowe (Programme Manager South Dunedin Future), Florence Reynolds (Acting Manager Zero Carbon), Louise van de Vlierd (Manager Visitor Centre), Jeanine Benson (Group Manager Transport), Sharon Bodeker (Manager Governance),Warren Allen (Chairperson, Audit & Risk Subcommittee), Carolyn Allan (Acting Chief Financial Officer), Anna Nilsen (Group Manager Property Services), Keith Cooper (Chairperson, Dunedin City Holdings Limited), Peter Hocking (General Manager, Dunedin City Holdings Limited) and Clare Sullivan (Principal Committee Advisor)

 

Governance Support Officer                  Lynne Adamson

 

 

1          Opening

Tania Sharee Williams, Araiteuru Marae opened the meeting with a karakia. 

2          Public Forum

             Physio Pool

             Neville Martin, Secretary/Treasurer Otago Therapeutic Trust spoke to his handout on the physio pool.

 

Cr Carmen Houlahan entered the meeting at 9.08 am.

 

             Mr Martin responded to questions.

 

 

             Dunedin Trails Trust

             Sarah Davie-Nitis and Rachel Elder provided a PowerPoint presentation and spoke on connecting the northern coastal communities and Mosgiel to Waihola through multi use of shared trails.

 

             Ms Davie-Nitis and Ms Elder responded to questions.

 

 

             Cycle Trail Ideas

             Simon Noble spoke to his PowerPoint presentation on comments and concerns about the proposed Waihola to Mosgiel Cycle trail.  Mr Noble then responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Mandy Mayhem):

 

That the Council:

 

             Extends the Public Forum beyond 30 Minutes.

 

                         Motion carried

 

 

             Coastal Communities Cycle Connection

             Emily Cooper spoke on behalf of the Coastal Communities Cycle Connection and provided an update on the project and the inclusion of the funding for the northern cycleway in the 10 year plan. 

 

             Ms Cooper responded to questions.

 

 

             Dust Suppression

             Glen Standring and Shirley Bellugue spoke on the dust suppression policy and its implications for their road, Islay Street.  These included the cost and affordability to the ratepayer and specifically the impact of the costs to superannuants.

 

             Mr Standring and Ms Bellugue responded to questions.

 

             Protecting Local Democracy

             Diane Yeldon spoke on various issues.  She requested Council review the Code of Conduct and make it open for public consultation. 

 

Ms Yeldon asked that Council consider the protocol and process for the decision on who speaks at public forum.  She then spoke of the preliminary 10 year plan process and provided suggestions on the process including making people’s responses to the questionnaire public to enable others to include the same topic in their submission. 

 

 

Local Food Resilience

Sue Novell and Andy Barratt of Our Food Network with Senior Climate Action Network spoke on the importance of local food resilience and a request to fund a food resilience coordinator in the 10 year plan.

 

Ms Novell and Mr Barratt responded to questions.

 

 

Complaint and Rates

Sandra Paul, Lotus College spoke about a complaint she had lodged with the Council and concerns about the city which included rates issues, services provided and the state of her road. 

 

The Mayor advised that he would respond to her complaints.

 

 

Central City Work

Alex Kerr advised that he felt he had not been consulted with on many works being undertaken in the city.  He spoke of Council responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2002 and on specific work undertaken in the central city.  Mr Kerr complained about the loss of car parks and the one way section of George Street.

 

 

Public Toilets

Jennifer Scott spoke on her participation in the recent heritage public loo walking tour of Dunedin and the knowledge she gained on pioneer times and the underground toilets etc. 

 

Ms Scott promoted public toilets for women.  She would like female only toilets which were accessible and comfortable.  She would like the Woodhaugh Gardens toilets upgraded and asked for the inclusion of heated flooring in female only changing rooms at the local pools.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for five minutes.

 

                         Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 10.32 am  and reconvened at 10.49 am.


 

3          APOLOGIES

             The Mayor acknowledged an apology for early departure from Cr Bill Acklin and extened condolences on behalf of Council to Cr Acklin for the recent loss of his mother.

 

 

 

4          CONFIRMATION OF AGENDA

 

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Lee Vandervis):

That the Council:

 

Confirms the agenda without addition or alteration.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/238)

 

5          Declarations of interest

Members were reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arose between their role as an elected representative and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Elected Members' Interest Register; and

b)        Confirms the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

c)         Notes the proposed management plan for the Executive Leadership Team.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/239)

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

6.1       Ordinary Council meeting - 25 September 2023

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Kevin Gilbert):

That the Council:

 

a)         Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 25 September 2023 as a correct record.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/240)

  

Reports

7          Actions From Resolutions of Council Meetings

 

A report from Civic provided an update on the implementation of resolutions made at Council meetings. 

 

The Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

That the Council:

 

 

a)         Notes the Open and Completed Actions from resolutions of Council meetings.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/241)

 

8          Forward Work Programme for Council - October 2023

 

A report from Civic provided the updated forward work programme for the 2023-2024 year.

 

The Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham) spoke to the report and responded to questions. 

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

a)     Notes the updated Council forward work programme.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/242)

 

9          Community Housing Development - Update

 

A report from Property provided an update on the Community Housing Development programme, and other related work in the DCC Community Housing portfolio.

 

The Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham), General Manager Corporate and Quality (Robert West) and Group Manager Property Services (Anna Nilsen) spoke to the report and responded to questions. 

 

Cr Carmen Houlahan left the meeting at 11.02 am and returned at 11.05 am.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Carmen Houlahan):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Community Housing Redevelopment Programme update.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/243)

 

10        Edgar Centre - Update Report

 

A report from Property provided an update on the condition of, and forward work maintenance programme for the Edgar Centre.

 

The General Manager Corporate and Quality (Robert West) and Group Manager Property Services (Anna Nilsen) spoke to the report and responded to questions on the operating grant, maintenance, usage demand and future demand of the Edgar Centre.

 

Cr Carmen Houlahan left the meeting at 11.49 am and returned at 11.52 am.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Marie Laufiso):

That the Council:

 

a)              Notes the Edgar Centre Update Report.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/244)

 

11        Aquatic Network Co-investment Update

 

A report from Parks and Recreation provided an update on initial engagement with the Ministry of Education, Otago Community Trust and gaming charities, to discuss potential co-investment options in the aquatic network. The report also updated Council on ongoing engagement with the Otago Therapeutic Pool Trust.

 

The General Manager Community Services (Acting) (Jeanette Wikaira) and Group Manager Parks and Recreation (Scott MacLean) spoke to the report and responded to questions which included hub pools, annual operational funding and technical advice for some pools.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Mandy Mayhem):

That the Council:

 

a)              Notes the Aquatic Network Co-investment Update report.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/245)

 

12        Zero Carbon Alliance Work Programme Update

 

A report from Corporate Policy provided an update on the Zero Carbon Alliance work programme.

 

The Acting Manager Zero Carbon (Florence Reynolds) and Manahautū (General Manager Māori Partnerships and Policy)(Acting) (Nicola Morand) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

Cr Mandy Mayhem left the meeting at 12.12 pm.

 

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Zero Carbon Alliance work programme update.

 Motion carried (CNL/2023/246)

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Marie Laufiso):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting until 2.00 pm.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 12.18 pm and Cr Bill Acklin left the meeting.

The meeting reconvened at 2.12 pm.

 

13        Exploring a Biodiversity Credit System for Aotearoa New Zealand - Submission

 

A report from City Development sought consideration and approval of a draft submission to the Ministry for the Environment and the Department of Conservation on Exploring a Biodiversity Credit System for Aotearoa New Zealand (the BCS).

 

The Biodiversity Advisor (Zoe Lunniss), Team Leader Advisory Services (Mark Mawdsley) and Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development (David Ward) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Carmen Houlahan):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves the draft Dunedin City Council submission, on Exploring a Biodiversity Credit System for Aotearoa New Zealand

b)        Authorises the Mayor or his delegate to speak to the submission at any hearings.

c)         Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial amendments to the submission.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                  Crs Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Jim O'Malley, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (12).

Against:         Cr Lee Vandervis (1).

Abstained:   Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 1

Motion carried (CNL/2023/247)

14        The Inquiry into Climate Adaptation - Submission

 

A report from Māori, Partnerships & Policy sought consideration and approval of a submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Inquiry into Climate Adaptation.

 

The Manahautū (General Manager Māori Partnerships and Policy) (Acting) Nicola Morand and Programme Manager South Dunedin Future (Jonathan Rowe) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

Cr Marie Laufiso requested changes to the submission.

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Marie Laufiso):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for five minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 2.41 pm and reconvened at 2.52 pm.

 

 

Moved (Cr Marie Laufiso/Cr Christine Garey):

That the Council:

a)         Amends the Dunedin City Council submission as follows:

New Para 19:

DCC supports the definition of Te Tiriti-based adaptation in paragraph 87 of the Issues and Options paper, which speaks to Māori involvement throughout the process, creating space for rakatirataka, providing access to relevant information, and embedding te ao Māori and mātauraka Māori in the process.

 

         New Para 20 :

While we are constrained by the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi (Lands Case, 1987), the DCC strongly supports aspirational efforts towards Te Tiriti o Waitangi thereby further strengthening our relationship with mana whenua. This is so that the adaptation system upholds Māori rights and interests and provides a foundation for discussion with mana whenua about appropriate and effective adaptation responses, including ‘managed-relocation’ and ‘te hekenga rauora’

Motion carried (CNL/2023/248)

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Christine Garey):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves the amended Dunedin City Council submission, into the Inquiry on Climate Adaptation.

b)        Authorises the Mayor or his delegate to speak to the submission at any hearing.

c)         Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial amendments to the submission.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                  Crs Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Jim O'Malley, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (12).

Against:         Cr Lee Vandervis (1).

Abstained:    Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 1

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/249)

 

15        Advancing New Zealand's Energy Transition - Submission

 

A report from Corporate Policy sought consideration and approval of a submission to the Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment consultation on Advancing New Zealand’s Energy Transition.

 

The Manahautū (General Manager Māori Partnerships and Policy) (Acting) Nicola Morand and Acting Manager Zero Carbon (Florence Reynolds) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Jim O'Malley):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves the draft Dunedin City Council submission on Advancing New Zealand’s Energy Transition.

b)        Authorises the Mayor or his delegate to speak to the submission at any hearings.

c)         Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial amendments to the submission.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                 Crs Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Jim O'Malley, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (12).

Against:         Cr Lee Vandervis (1).

Abstained:   Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 1

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/250)

16        Dunedin Heritage Fund Activity Report 2022-2023

 

A report from City Development provided an update on the activity of the Dunedin Heritage Fund and the grants allocated in the 2022-2023 financial year. 

 

The Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development (David Ward), and Team Leader Advisory Services (Mark Mawdsley) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Cr Christine Garey/Cr Sophie Barker):

That the Council:

 

a)     Notes the Dunedin Heritage Fund Activity Report 2022-2023.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/251)

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Carmen Houlahan)

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for five minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 3.30 pm and reconvened at 3.40 pm.

 

17        Cruise Update Report 2022/23

 

A report from Enterprise Dunedin showed the results of the 2022/23 cruise season and forecasts for the 2023/24 season (commences 7 November 2023).

 

The Manager Enterprise Dunedin (John Christie) and Manager Visitor Centre (Louise van de Vlierd) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Cr Andrew Whiley/Cr Christine Garey):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Enterprise Dunedin Cruise Update Report 2022/23.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/252)

 

18        Appointment of Hearing Panel for the Gambling and TAB Venue Policy Review

 

A report from the Office of the Mayor sought the establishment of a hearing panel to consider submissions received on the Gambling and TAB Venue Policy review, hear from those submitters who wished to present, and make recommendations on the Policy to Council.

 

Cr Jim O’Malley spoke to the report.

 

 

Moved (Cr Jim O'Malley/Cr Cherry Lucas):

That the Council:

a)         Appoints Crs Bill Acklin (Chair), Kevin Gilbert and David Benson-Pope to the hearing panel for the Gambling and TAB Venue Policy.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/253)

 

19        Project China Update

 

A report from Enterprise Dunedin provided an update on Project China activities.

 

The Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham) and Manager Enterprise Dunedin (John Christie) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Andrew Whiley):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Project China Update report.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                  Crs Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Jim O'Malley, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (12).

Against:          Cr Lee Vandervis (1).

Abstained:    Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 1

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/254)

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting until 9.00 am

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 5.00 pm and reconvened at 9.03 am on Tuesday 31 October 2023.

 

The Mayor advised that Crs Mandy Mayhem and Jim O’Malley had submitted apologies.

 

20        3 Waters Update Report

 

This item was deferred to the November 2023 Council meeting.

 

21        Mosgiel Heavy Vehicle Bypass

 

A report from Transport summarised the work completed to date on investigation of a heavy vehicle bypass around Mosgiel and summarised the next steps regarding funding requests for future work to commence.

 

The Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development (David Ward) and Group Manager Transport (Jeanine Benson) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Carmen Houlahan):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the report on the Mosgiel heavy vehicle bypass.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/255)

 

 

22        Draft provisions for inclusion in Otago Regional Council's proposed Land and Water Regional Plan - Submission

 

A report from 3 Waters sought approval of a draft submission to the Otago Regional Council on proposals related to the development of the ORC’s proposed Land and Water Regional Plan.

 

The Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development (David Ward) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves, the DCC submission to the Otago Regional Council on the proposed Land and Water Regional Plan (with the addition of commentary that supports the concerns publicly expressed by City Forests about the effects of the plan on forestry operations).

b)        Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial changes if required.

c)         Notes that staff would continue discussions with ORC staff to ensure Council’s issues are fully understood.

d)        Authorises the Mayor (or his delegate) to speak to the draft submission if the opportunity was provided.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                 Crs Bill Acklin, Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Lee Vandervis, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (13).

Against:         Nil

Abstained:   Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 13 votes to 0

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/256)

 

23        The Electoral (Lowering Voting Age for Local Elections and Polls) Legislation Bill - Submission

 

A report from Corporate Policy sought approval of a draft submission to Parliament’s Justice Committee on the Electoral (Lowering Voting Age for Local Elections and Polls) Legislation Bill.

 

The General Manager Community Services (Jeanette Wikaira) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

Cr Carmen Houlahan left the meeting at 10.09 am and returned at 10.12 am.

 

 

Moved (Cr Steve Walker/Cr Bill Acklin):

That the Council:

a)          Approves the draft Dunedin City Council submission on the Electoral (Lowering Voting Age for Local Elections and Polls) Legislation Bill.

b)          Authorises the Mayor or his delegate to speak to the submission at Select Committee hearings.

c)         Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial amendments to the              submission.

 

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                 Crs Bill Acklin, Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Steve Walker and Mayor Jules Radich (10).

Against:        Crs Lee Vandervis, Brent Weatherall and Andrew Whiley (3).

Abstained:   Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 10 votes to 3

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/257)

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Marie Laufiso)

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for five minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 10.56 am and reconvened at 11.10 am.

 

24        Emergency Management Bill - Submission

 

A report from Corporate Policy sought Council approval of a draft submission to Parliament’s Governance and Administration Committee on the Emergency Management Bill.

 

The Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham) and General Manager Community Services (Acting) (Jeanette Wikaira) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Kevin Gilbert):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for five minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 11.18 am and reconvened at 11.24 am.

 

 

The discussion on the Emergency Management Bill – Submission continued.

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for two minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 11.33 am and reconvened at 11.34 am.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves the draft Dunedin City Council submission on the Emergency Management Bill

b)        Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial amendments to the submission.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                  Crs Bill Acklin, Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (12).

Against:         Cr Lee Vandervis (1).

Abstained:    Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 12 votes to 1

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/258)

 

25        Traffic and Parking Bylaw review

 

A report from Transport sought approval to commence the review of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw. The report recommended that the Council determined a bylaw was the most appropriate way to address issues relating to managing traffic and parking in Dunedin.

 

The Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development (David Ward) and Group Manager Transport (Jeanine Benson) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves commencement of the review of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw.  

b)        Determines that a bylaw was the most appropriate way to address issues relating to managing traffic and parking in Dunedin.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/259) with Cr Lee Vandervis recording his vote against

 

26        Naming of a Private Way

 

A report from Transport sought the approval of a road name for a private way in Concord.

 

The Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development (David Ward) and Group Manager Transport (Jeanine Benson) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Cr Lee Vandervis/Cr Bill Acklin):

That the Council:

 

a)         Approves the naming of the private way located at 16, 18 & 20 Emerson Street, 3A & 3B Roy Crescent as ‘Vandes Way’.

Motion carried (CNL/2023/260)

 

29        Proposed Event Road Closures - December 2023 to February 2024

 

A report from Transport recommended approval of temporary road closures relating to events to be held in December 2023, January 2024 and February 2024.

 

The Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham) spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

 

Moved (Cr Lee Vandervis/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

a)         Resolves to close the roads detailed below (pursuant to Section 319, Section 342, and Schedule 10 clause 11(e) of the Local Government Act 1974 (LGA 1974)):

i)     Lighting of the Christmas Tree

Dates and Times:

Saturday 2 December 2023, from 6.00pm to 11.00pm

Roads:

·    Lower Octagon, between George Street and Lower Stuart Street

·    Lower Stuart Street, between the Octagon and Moray Place

Bath Street will remain open.

 

ii)    Santa Parade

Date:

Sunday 3 December 2023 (postponement date 10 December 2023)

Roads and Times:

From 8.00am until 6.00pm:

·    George Street, between Regent Street and Duke Street

From 2.00pm until 6.00pm:

·    George Street, between the Octagon and Duke Street

·    Titan Street

·    The Octagon Central Carriageway

·    Harrop Street

·    Princes Street, between the Octagon and Moray Place

·    Moray Place, between Princes Street and Lower Stuart Street

·    Burlington Street

·    Upper Stuart Street, between the Octagon and Moray Place

·    Lower Stuart Street, between the Octagon and Moray Place

 

Parking restrictions will be in place on Dowling Street at the corner of Princes Street

 

iii)  Motorsport Hillclimb

Date:

Saturday 2 December 2023

Roads and Times:

From 8.00am to 6.00pm:

·    Flagstaff-Whare Flat Road, from Rollinsons Road to Longridge Road

Date:

Sunday 3 December 2023

Roads and Times:

From 7.30am to 6.00pm:

·    Three Mile Hill Road, from Halfway Bush Road to Silverstream Valley Road

 

iv)   December Graduation Parades

Dates:

·    Saturday 9 December 2023

·    Wednesday 13 December 2023

·    Saturday 16 December 2023

Roads and Times:

From 11.00am to 11.30am:

·    Moray Place, between Lower Stuart and Burlington Streets

 

From 11.10am to 12.30pm:

·    Moray Place, between George and Upper Stuart Streets

·    Filleul Street, between Moray Place and St Andrew Street

From 11.20am to 11.45am (Parade Route):

·    Moray Place, between Burlington and Princes Streets

·    Princes Street, between Moray Place and the Octagon

·    Octagon Central Carriageway

·    George Street, between Octagon to Moray Place

 

Roads will reopen as the Parade clears.

 

v)    New Year’s Eve Octagon Celebrations 2023/2024

Dates:

Sunday 31 December 2023 and Monday 1 January 2024

 

Roads and Times:

From 7.00am, Sunday 31 December 2023 to 8.00am, Monday 1 January 2024:

·    Lower Octagon

·    Lower Stuart Street 

 

Access to Bath Street will remain available.

From 2.00pm Sunday 31 December 2023 to 3.00am Monday 1 January 2024:

·    Entire Octagon

·    Upper Stuart Street

·    Princes Street, from the Octagon to Moray Place

·    George Street, from the Octagon to Moray Place

·    Harrop Street

·    Bath Street

 

vi)   Colgate Games

Dates and Times:

From 7.00am, Friday 12 January 2024 to 7.00pm, Sunday 14 January 2024

Roads:

·    Logan Park Drive, from Anzac Avenue to Butts Road

 

vii) Brighton Gala Day 2024

Dates and Times:

From 7.00am, Sunday 21 January 2024 to 6.30pm

Roads:

·    Brighton Road, between Bath Street and Taylor Street

 

viii) Vintage Car Club Meeting

Dates and Times:

From 10.00am, Saturday 27 January 2024 to 1.00pm

Roads:

·    The Octagon Central Carriageway

·    Upper Stuart Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

·    Lower Stuart Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

·    George Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

·    Princes Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

 

Bath Street will remain open.

 

ix)   Chinese New Year Celebrations 2024

Dates:

Friday 9 February 2023 and Saturday 10 February 2024

 

Roads and Times:

From 5.00pm, Friday 9 February 2024 to 11.30pm, Saturday 10 February 2024:

·    Carpark at end of Queens Gardens cul-de-sac

Saturday 10 February 2024 (all times below are Saturday 10 February 2024)

 

From 5.00pm to 11.30pm:

·    Queens Gardens cul-de-sac, from Cumberland Street to the Carpark

From 6.00pm to 7.15pm:

·    Princes Street, from The Octagon to Moray Place

From 7.15pm to 7.30pm:

·    Princes Street and Rattray Street, from Moray Place to Cumberland Street (for the Dragon Parade)

From 9.30pm to 10.30pm:

·    Thomas Burns Street, from Fryatt Street to Mason Street

·    Wharf Street northbound, from the Cumberland Street overbridge to Fryatt Street

 

x)    Thieves Alley Market Day

Date and Times:

Saturday 24 February 2024, from 5.00am to 6.00pm

Roads:

·    The Octagon

·    Bath Street

·    Harrop Street

·    Upper Stuart Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

·    Lower Stuart Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

·    George Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

·    Princes Street, from Moray Place to The Octagon

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/261)

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for 40 minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 11.51 am and reconvened at 12.33 pm.

 

Moved (Cr Sophie Barker/Cr Bill Acklin):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for 10 minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 12.33 pm and reconvened at 12.45 pm.

 

 

27        Dunedin City Council Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2023

 

A report from Finance sought approval and adoption of the Annual Report for the Dunedin City Council for the financial year ended 30 June 2023.

 

The Chairperson (Audit and Risk Subcommittee) (Warren Allen), Chief Executive Officer (Sandy Graham), Acting Chief Financial Officer (Carolyn Allan) and Manager Governance (Sharon Bodeker) tabled and spoke to a schedule of updates.  They then spoke to the report and responded to questions.

 

Cr Carmen Houlahan left the meeting at 1.24 pm and returned at 1.27 pm.

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Cherry Lucas):

That the Council:

 

a)     Approves the Dunedin City Council Annual Report for the financial year ended 30 June 2023.

b)     Delegates the Chief Executive the authority to make any minor editing required to the approved Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2023.

c)     Authorises the Mayor and Chief Executive to sign the Statement of Compliance and Responsibility on behalf of Council.

d)     Authorises the Mayor and Chief Executive to sign the Letter of Representation to the auditor on behalf of Council.

e)     Receives the Audit Report on the Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2023; and

f)     Adopts the audited Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2023.

Division

The Council voted by division

 

For:                 Crs Bill Acklin, Sophie Barker, David Benson-Pope, Christine Garey, Kevin Gilbert, Carmen Houlahan, Marie Laufiso, Cherry Lucas, Lee Vandervis, Steve Walker, Brent Weatherall, Andrew Whiley and Mayor Jules Radich (13).

Against:         Nil

Abstained:   Nil

 

The division was declared CARRIED by 13 votes to 0

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/262)

 

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

 

That the Council:

 

             Adjourns the meeting for five minutes.

 

             Motion carried

 

The meeting adjourned at 2.13 pm and reconvened at 2.28 pm.

 

28        2023 Annual Reports for the Dunedin City Holdings Ltd Group

 

A report from Civic appended the 2023 Annual Reports of Dunedin City Holdings Ltd Group companies.

 

The Chairperson DCHL (Keith Cooper) and General Manager, DCHL (Peter Hocking) spoke to the reports and responded to questions on the annual reports. 

 

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the 2023 Annual Reports of:

-      Dunedin City Holdings Limited

-      Dunedin City Treasury Limited

-      Aurora Energy Limited

-      City Forests Limited

-      Delta Utility Services Limited

-      Dunedin International Airport Limited

-      Dunedin Railways Limited

-      Dunedin Stadium Property Limited

-      Dunedin Venues Management Limited

Motion carried (CNL/2023/263)

        

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

 

Moved (Mayor Jules Radich/Cr Steve Walker):

That the Council:

 

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, exclude the public from the following part of the proceedings of this meeting namely:

 

General subject of the matter to be considered

Reasons for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

 

Reason for Confidentiality

C1  Ordinary Council meeting - 25 September 2023 - Public Excluded

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S7(2)(g)

The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

 

S7(2)(h)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

 

S7(2)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

 

.

 

C2  Confidential Council Actions from Resolutions at Council Meetings

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

 

S7(2)(g)

The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

 

S7(2)(h)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

 

S7(2)(i)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C3  Confidential Council Forward Work Programme - October 2023

S7(2)(h)

The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C4  Appointment of District Licensing Committee Members

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C5  Future Development Strategy - Joint Hearing Panel Appointments

S7(2)(a)

The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

S48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act, or Section 6 or Section 7 or Section 9 of the Official Information Act 1982, as the case may require, which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public are as shown above after each item.

 

Motion carried (CNL/2023/264)

 

 

The meeting moved into confidential at 3.08 pm and concluded at 3.58 pm

 

 

 

 

..............................................

MAYOR


Council

28 November 2023

 

Reports

 

Actions From Resolutions of Council Meetings

Department: Civic

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The purpose of this report is to show progress on implementing resolutions made at Council meetings. 

2          As this report is an administrative report only, there are no options or Summary of Considerations.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Open and Completed Actions from resolutions of Council meetings as attached.

 

discussion

3          This report also provides an update on resolutions that have been actioned and completed since the last Council meeting.  Note that items on the Forward Work Programme are not included in the attached schedules.

NEXT STEPS

4          Updates will be provided at future Council meetings.

 

Signatories

Author:

Lynne Adamson - Governance Support Officer

Authoriser:

Clare Sullivan - Manager Governance

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Council Public Open Action List

43

b

Council Public Closed Action List

45

 

 


 


Council

28 November 2023

 



Council

28 November 2023

 



Council

28 November 2023

 

 

Forward Work Programme for Council - November 2023

Department: Civic

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The purpose of this report is to provide the updated forward work programme for the 2023-2024 year (Attachment A). 

2          As this is an administrative report only, there are no options or Summary of Considerations.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the updated Council forward work programme as shown in Attachment A.

 

DISCUSSION

3          The forward work programme is a regular agenda item which shows areas of activity, progress and expected timeframes for Council decision making across a range of areas of work. 

4          As an update report, the purple highlight shows changes to timeframes.  New items added to the schedule are highlighted in yellow. Items that have been completed or updated are shown as bold. 

NEXT STEPS

5          An updated report will be presented to future Council meetings.

 

Signatories

Author:

Clare Sullivan - Manager Governance

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Council Forward Work Programme - November 2023

49

 

 



Council

28 November 2023

 











Council

28 November 2023

 

 

Petition

Department: Executive Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          In accordance with Standing Order 16.1, I received the attached Petition on “STOP the DCC Defunding Dust Suppressions for our Suburban Gravel Road” from Glenn Standring and Annette Bellugue and signed by 56 other residents.

2          This petition was received at least five clear working days before the meeting, for inclusion on the agenda for the meeting being held on Tuesday 28 November 2023.

3          The names and contact details of the signatories have been withheld to protect their privacy as they were not aware their names and details could be made publicly available.

4          The petitioners did not wish to speak to the petition as they presented at the last public forum.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Receives the petition.

Signatories

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Stop the DCC Defunding Dust Suppressions for our Suburban Gravel Road Petition

60

 

 

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 






Council

28 November 2023

 

 

South Dunedin Future - Programme Strategy Update

Department: Maori, Partnerships & Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The purpose of this report is to seek Council approval of the revised strategy for the South Dunedin Future programme.

2          The South Dunedin Future (SDF) programme is a joint initiative between the Dunedin City Council (DCC) and Otago Regional Council (ORC) to develop a climate change adaptation strategy for South Dunedin.

3          A strategic intent for the SDF programme was approved by Council Committees in July 2022 and has guided implementation over the past 18 months. As foreshadowed at the time of approval, the evolving nature of the SDF programme and external factors – including interactions across central government, local government, with mana whenua, and affected communities - have informed further development and revision of the programme strategy.

4          This paper summarises the programme context and problems that it is trying to resolve. It canvasses a range of factors relevant to the programme strategy, proposes several revisions and provides justifications, and signals the impact that the strategy may have on both the delivery and anticipated outcomes of the programme. Finally, the paper recommends a revised SDF programme strategy.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Notes the South Dunedin Future programme has been operating in accordance with the strategic intent approved by both Councils in July 2022 (included at Attachment A).

b)        Notes the work undertaken to develop a revised South Dunedin Future programme strategy.

c)         Approves the revised South Dunedin Future programme strategy (included as Attachment B).

d)        Notes the strategy will guide the South Dunedin Future programme, including programme communications and engagement, risk assessment, and development of adaptation options.

 

BACKGROUND

5          The South Dunedin Future (SDF) programme is a joint initiative between the Dunedin City Council (DCC) and Otago Regional Council (ORC) to develop a climate change adaptation strategy for South Dunedin.

6          A programme plan, which outlined the high-level approach for developing the adaptation strategy and delivering the SDF programme was approved by DCC and ORC Council Committees in July 2022 (refer report OPS2223, Strategy and Planning Committee, 13 July 2022). The programme plan included a strategic intent, which described a programme vision, purpose, and set of strategic and operational objectives. A diagram of this strategic intent is included as Attachment A.

7          The programme plan also noted the evolving nature of the programme vision, purpose, and objectives. This included that the strategic intent for the programme would be further developed and revised as the programme progressed, and this would involve collaboration with central government, local government, iwi/Māori, private sector and communities.

8          Since approval of the strategic intent in July 2022, the SDF programme has progressed to implementation and a range of work has been undertaken to further develop and revise the programme strategy. A number of events have also occurred outside the programme that have relevance for this work. This includes developments at central government level, within local government, with mana whenua partners, and with affected communities.

DISCUSSION

Strategic Context

 

9          South Dunedin is built on the flat area between Otago Harbour, the southern coastline and surrounding hill suburbs. It is home to about 13,500 people, 1,500 businesses and a range of critical city infrastructure and public amenities. This former coastal wetland has been developed, filled in and reclaimed over time, creating an area that has become a basin with no natural outflows.

10        Over time, coastal erosion and high groundwater have impacted the community and the sea-level is estimated to have already risen about 20 centimetres during the past 120 years. In 2015, heavy rainfall exceeded the operating capacity of stormwater systems, which led to extensive flooding across South Dunedin. These heavy rainfall events are expected to increase in intensity and frequency in the future, as rising sea-levels and high groundwater also reduce the capacity of the ground to absorb water, the flood risk will increase. The impacts of climate change are expected to intensify these hazards presenting increasing risk to the people, assets, and places of value in South Dunedin.

11        The DCC and ORC support initiatives to minimise the negative impacts arising from climate change, to identify opportunities to enhance wellbeing through adaptation, and to future-proof our natural and built environments. Adaptation means adjusting to the actual or expected climate and its effects, to reduce harm and take advantage of new opportunities. This includes the need for local adaptation planning, particularly where historic land use planning has not foreseen, or not taken account of, changes in weather patterns or landforms, and the natural hazard risks are or will become too high. South Dunedin one such example.

Case for change

12        There are a range of challenges facing South Dunedin. Many of these are complex and interlinked, without simple or quick resolutions, and with historical origins – the implications of which endure to present day. Overcoming old challenges will likely require new ideas and approaches, and this is a key focus of the SDF programme. Part of this includes laying out the case for change and describing the current trajectory to highlight why change is needed.

13        South Dunedin is subject to flooding and other natural hazards, which present risk to people, places and infrastructure. Some of these risks are expected to increase due to climate change, though uncertainty remains about timing and severity of impacts, which makes planning more difficult for councils, affected communities, and other stakeholders.

14        This uncertainty means that current investment by public and private sectors is likely not adequately accounting for current or future flood risk. The consequences could include maladaptation and potentially higher costs for communities, councils and central government in the long term, including through disaster response, recovery and rebuild or a reduction in the expected operational life of assets and critical infrastructure.

15        Downstream risks of systemic shocks and market failures are increasing (e.g. major flood event, finance or insurance withdrawal, property market decline), potentially leading to sudden and significant disruption or damage to social and economic wellbeing, particularly for affected communities in South Dunedin.

Revised SDF Programme Strategy

 

16        The SDF programme seeks to rise to these challenges, and to enable any changes in thinking and approach necessary to place South Dunedin on a safer, and better trajectory.

17        Specifically, the SDF Programme will do this through: (i) detailed scientific and technical work to better understand natural hazards and the impacts of climate change; (ii) community engagement work to determine the views, values and aspirations of partners and stakeholders; (iii) risk assessment work to quantify and assess the threats posed to people, places and assets; and (iv) adaptation options work to determine appropriate responses and mitigations.

18        These initiatives will be guided by the programme strategy, which articulates the vision, purpose and objectives of the SDF programme, shapes how the programme will respond to the problems noted above, and describes the outcomes sought from that process.

19        The sections below describe work that has been undertaken to further develop the existing programme strategic intent into a revised programme strategy. This is broken into four sections and describes key considerations and proposed changes to the strategy at central government level, within local government, with mana whenua partners, and with directly affected communities.

Central Government

20        Central government is a key stakeholder and will play an important role in climate change adaptation in South Dunedin. Central government sets some of the legislative, regulatory, and policy context within which the SDF programme will be delivered, provides funding for a range of services and infrastructure of relevance to the programme, owns and operates community infrastructure and facilities (e.g. schools), and may play a key role in funding implementation of the climate change adaptation strategy being developed for South Dunedin.

21        There have been several developments at a central government level since July 2022 that are material for the SDF programme strategy. These include:

·        Release of the first National Adaptation Plan (NAP), which sets out Aotearoa New Zealand’s long-term strategy and maps out the Government’s approach to climate change adaptation. The NAP includes a range of national goals, principles, and focus areas of relevance to the SDF programme.

·        Central government is undertaking an inquiry into climate change adaptation, including funding models and managed retreat. The Ministry for the Environment has also released an Issues & Options paper on Community-led Retreat and released updated climate change data and guidance, which includes direction for local government on adaptation planning.

·        The ongoing reform of the Resource Management Act, Local Government sector reform, and Three Waters reform, and draft National Policy Statement on Natural Hazards, are areas of the legislative, regulatory and policy context that will have a material impact on the delivery and outcomes of the SDF programme. The incoming government has already signalled changes in direction of some reform programmes, though details are yet to be confirmed.

22        The following changes are proposed to the SDF programme strategy based on central government developments since July 2022:

·        Reframe some of the strategic objectives to better align with the objectives of the NAP, and seek to reflect the NAP’s 10 principles for climate action, thereby strengthening strategic coherence between national and local approaches, and edit some of the language to make it more consistent with national terminology, enabling clearer communication.

23        Local Government

24        Climate change adaptation is a global issue, though one that must be tackled locally, given the specific impacts of climate change are generally unique to each location and therefore felt at a local level. This factor places regional and district councils in a central role with an increasing responsibility to develop adaptation strategies, plans and actions that will strengthen resilience and promote the wellbeing of local communities.

25        Central government is working to develop a national adaptation framework in which roles, responsibilities and resources are more clearly outlined. Once in place, national direction and coherence will support more effective adaptation responses, but these will always require locally-led decision-making and delivery. It is therefore important to ensure climate change adaptation and resilience is embedded across local government, and that adaptation plans are fit-for-purpose and can be implemented by councils.

26        There have been several developments at a local government level since July 2022 that are material for the SDF programme strategy. These include:

·        DCC and ORC are collaborating to produce a Future Development Strategy (FDS), which focuses on ensuring Dunedin is a well-functioning urban environment, including having sufficient land and infrastructure for future growth. The FDS focus is similar to the SDF programme, though timeframes differ, so staff have sought to collaborate to ensure strategic coherence, noting South Dunedin specific issues will be explored in much greater detail by the SDF programme over the period 2023-26, and that this information will inform subsequent strategic spatial planning processes.

·        The Proposed Otago Regional Policy Statement 2021 (Proposed RPS 21) was notified in June 2021 and sets the direction for future management of Otago's natural and physical resources. The Proposed RPS 21 informed the SDF programme strategic intent and strategy revision, and its policies and objectives will influence programme implementation, including through the District Plan.

·        The cross-cutting nature of climate change adaptation means that many local government strategies, policies and plans have relevance to the SDF programme. For example, recent approval of the DCC Zero Carbon Plan, DCC’s 3 Waters Integrated System Planning (ISP) project, and DCC work to scope development of a city-wide climate adaptation plan, and ORC work to develop a regional climate change strategy, have influenced the strategy revision process and will likely impact programme delivery.

27        The following changes are proposed to the SDF programme strategy based on local government developments since July 2022:

·        Adopting a more holistic vision and purpose, where there is a dual focus on resilience and wider wellbeing, acknowledging the opportunities and potential co-benefits that can come with change, and placing more prominence on a community-centred approach, following feedback from Councillors.

·        Weaving climate adaptation principles from the NAP into updated operational objectives of the SDF programme, where these are assessed at aligning with local direction and priorities set by Councils.

Mana whenua

28        The Local Government Act (LGA) 2002 recognises and respects the Crown’s obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi by placing some specific obligations on local authorities. These obligations are intended to facilitate participation by Māori in local authorities’ decision-making processes. The LGA (2002) charges local authorities with a clear responsibility to take an informed approach to how decision-making can benefit the social, cultural, economic and environmental well-being of the Māori community.

29        Māori participation in the climate change adaptation process, including adaptation planning, is of critical importance. There are a range of barriers to Māori adaptation that need to be acknowledged and addressed - adaptation planning must consider the special nature of Māori land and must account for the potential for climate change to have a disproportionate impact on Māori. Staff are actively considering these factors in SDF programme strategy, design and delivery.

30        Since July 2022, Council partnerships with mana whenua have evolved and developed, including in ways that are material for the SDF programme strategy. These include:

·        Reappointment of mana whenua representatives to Council Committees which oversee the SDF programme, including ORC’s Regional Leadership Committee and DCC’s Strategy, Policy and Engagement Committee. Importantly, this provides an opportunity to provide periodic strategic updates to mana whenua representatives, receive direct feedback, and factor this into programme strategy, design and delivery.

·        Te Taki Haruru - Māori Strategic Framework (Ta Taki Haruru), which was approved by DCC Council in September 2023, provides a framework for operationalising the Treaty of Waitangi partnership between mana whenua and DCC, and establishes te ao Māori aspirations to help guide contributions to Māori wellbeing across Ōtepoti Dunedin. These aspirations have informed revision of the SDF programme strategy. (Note: the SDF programme is also guided by He Mahi Rau Rika, ORC’s Significance, Engagement and Māori Participation Policy).

·        Operational level hui commenced with Aukaha in May 2023 and have occurred regularly since. These hui enable ongoing dialogue about SDF programme-related issues of relevance to mana whenua and Māori communities, and support work to integrate these into programme strategy, design and delivery.

31        The following changes are proposed to the SDF programme strategy based on developments in Council partnerships with mana whenua since July 2022:

·        Directly incorporating elements of Te Taki Haruru into the revised SDF strategy, including the principles, values and key intent. In addition, SDF programme partnership commitments have been developed based on an interpretation of Te Taki Haruru through a South Dunedin Future lens, which seek to give effect to Te Taki Haruru in an SDF programme context. These elements are positioned at the top of the strategy framework, reflecting the primacy of the Treaty partnership, with arrows signalling that the specified commitments will contribute to the overall vision, purpose and strategic objectives of the SDF programme.

·        More broadly, general revisions have been made to the strategic and operational objectives, to reflect the spirit and intent of Te Taki Haruru – particularly where these also align closely with central government, local government and community-derived changes.

32        It is important to note that SDF programme partnership conversations with mana whenua are at a relatively early stage. While these have been positive, and reflect good faith dialogue over several months, further work is required to develop and strengthen the partnership. This includes more fully exploring how mana whenua would like to engage with the SDF programme, how Te Taki Haruru might be operationalised in an SDF programme context, and specific aspirations mana whenua may have for this mahi.

Community Engagement

33        A key element of the SDF programme is community-centred engagement, working on the basis that affected communities should be fully involved in discussion about, and decisions on, their future – including in relation to adaptation planning. Understanding what matters most to the community, including their values, objectives and aspirations, is important for developing adaptation plans that are not only technically robust, but also widely understood and supported.

34        The SDF programme has undertaken extensive community engagement over the past four years, which has included meetings, surveys, presentations, workshops, newsletters and a series of face-to-face interactions. A wide range of data and insights have been collected during that period on community views, values and aspirations. This information has been analysed and, during the recent engagement round, was played back to the community to calibrate how closely it reflected public sentiment.

35        There have been several developments at community level since July 2022 that are material for the SDF programme strategy. These include:

·        The Auckland Anniversary floods and events surrounding Cyclone Gabrielle in early 2023 had an observable impact on public awareness of potential climate change impacts and attitudes towards adaptation. These changes appear to have occurred nationally, but locally have materialised as a growing interest in adaptation work, questioning of business-as-usual practices, and reduced resistance to using climate-related risk to better inform development planning.

·        An extensive community engagement round in 2023 saw the SDF programme distribute 14,000 flyers (two flyers, 7,000 copies each) to households in the focus area; write a letter to 1,700 non-resident property owners; host 25 engagement meetings and eight major engagement events with an estimated 1,000 people reached face-to-face; receive over 2,000 unique webpage visitors, 400 individual pieces of feedback, and 75 survey responses.

36        The following changes are proposed to the SDF programme strategy based on community engagement since July 2022:

·        Introduce a more positive framing, which recognises the opportunities that can come with change. This includes the notion of not only making South Dunedin a safer place, by reducing climate change impacts and associated risk, but also a better place to live, work and play through sustainable urban development and regeneration. This reframing has been well received by the community. These sentiments have been incorporated in the SDF programme vision and purpose and reflected in several of the strategic objectives.

·        Strengthen the references in the operational objectives to a community-centred programme to underscore the importance of community participation, understanding, and support.

·        Amend references to developing an ‘…adaptation strategy’ to developing a ‘…adaptation plan’, which reflects efforts towards using plain language, is consistent with programme communications material (“Let’s make a plan”), and would be more easily understood by the community.

Revised SDF Programme Strategy

37        A revised SDF Programme strategy has been developed, which seeks to amend the existing strategic intent, based on the points raised above. The revised strategy incorporates the various proposed changes detailed above, as well as the following structural amendments:

·        Inclusion of new section containing mana whenua principles, values and key intents, drawn directly from Te Taki Haruru – Māori Strategic Framework, as well as addition of new SDF Programme partnership commitments. This section is located at the top and is shown as contributing to the strategic objectives.

·        Various amendments to the strategic and operational objectives sections, including removing selected boxes and editing various text, to reflect a range of data and insights from central government, local government, mana whenua and community interactions.

·        Removal of the previous contextual section that summarised cross-council adaptation work, replacing this with a programme actions section that describes the five workstreams of the programme (each of which is more specific, but also cross-council in nature).

38        The revised programme strategy is not expected to impact the programme scope, budget, or timeframes. The revised strategy will however affect the direction and outcomes of the programme, as it provides the framework within which programme workstreams will operate. For example, the revised strategy will inform communications and community engagement activities by adopting the more positive framing of key issues; it will guide identification, screening and assessment of risks by outlining objectives and values that could be threatened by natural hazards and climate change; and it will shape criteria against which adaptation options will be assessed and scored, by describing the vision, purpose and objectives the options are expected to contribute towards.

OPTIONS

39        In July 2022, Councillors endorsed the current strategic intent, which has guided the SDF programme for the past 18 months. Three options are therefore available, (i) continuing with the existing strategic intent, (ii) adopting the revised programme strategy (recommended), or (iii) directing staff to undertake further work to develop an amended strategy, based on Councillor feedback. The advantages and disadvantages of each option are explored below.

Option One – Retain existing strategic intent (Status quo)

 

40        This option would involve retaining the existing strategic intent (included as Attachment A), as previously approved by Council Committees in July 2022, and continue to operate the SDF programme based on the strategic direction contained within.

Advantages

·        Achieves a degree of strategic continuity by maintaining current settings, avoiding mid-programme changes, and retaining a strategic direction that is broadly consistent with national direction and community sentiment.

Disadvantages

·        Failure to incorporate the views and values of partners and stakeholders could potentially misdirect the programme and its workstreams. For example, risk assessments and adaptation options and pathways could be produced that align with the current strategic intent by are inconsistent with evolving partner and stakeholder priorities. This could negatively impact relationships, potentially jeopardising future engagement work, and the wider success of the programme.

·        The existing strategic intent does not contain specific mana whenua content, particularly principles, values and intents, and therefore does not accurately reflect Councils’ Treaty of Waitangi partnerships.

·        Foregoes an opportunity to recalibrate the programme strategy based on recent interactions with central government, local government, mana whenua partners and affected communities, creating some increased risk of strategic misalignment.

Option Two – Adopt revised programme strategy (Recommended Option)

41        This option would involve replacing the existing strategic intent with the revised programme strategy, as outlined in this paper and included as Attachment B and advancing the programme on the basis of this strategic direction.

Advantages

·        As the strategy will guide the adaptation options process, this stronger alignment is more likely to produce risk assessments and adaption options and pathways that are consistent with partner and stakeholder priorities.

·        Incorporating the views and values of partners and stakeholders would likely strengthen relationships, laying a foundation for future engagement work.

·        The revised strategy includes specific mana whenua content, particularly principles, values and intents drawn from Te Taki Haruru – Maori Strategic Framework, as well and specific programme partnership commitments, which better reflects Councils’ Treaty of Waitangi partnerships.

·        The revised strategy is based on recent interactions with central government, local government, mana whenua partners and affected communities, is more current and better strategically aligned to these key partners and stakeholders.

Disadvantages

·        A mid-programme change of strategic direction potentially introduces a sense of discontinuity by shifting settings that are already broadly consistent with national direction and community sentiment.

Option Three – Direct staff to undertake further work and/or develop amended strategy

42        This option would involve undertaking additional work, at the direction of Councils, to amend the strategy further or take it in a different strategic direction.

Advantages

·        Undertaking further work could have the benefit of deepening the understanding of the views, values and aspirations of partners and stakeholders as well as more accurately reflecting Council strategic directions. This could lead to a stronger strategy with positive flow on effects for the SDF programme.

Disadvantages

·        Undertaking further work could delay programme implementation, as key elements such as the adaptation options process will be guided by the direction contained within the strategy. This could stall the momentum built over the past 12 months, and negatively affect partner and stakeholder views and engagement, many of whom are eager to see the programme progress to the next stages where spatial risks and options are developed for South Dunedin.

43        The recommended option is Option 2 - Adopt revised programme strategy because it would incorporate the latest developments and feedback from partners and stakeholders, provide the best available and well calibrated guidance for programme workstreams, while allowing the programme to move forward as scheduled. Options 1 and 3 are viable but would be less well-calibrated to partners and stakeholders (in the case of Option 1) and have potentially negative implications for programme schedule and costs (in the case of Option 3).

NEXT STEPS

44        Subject to Council decisions on the options proposed, staff and consultant teams will utilise the agreed strategic direction for the SDF programme to guide upcoming work on communications and community engagement, risk assessment, and adaptation options development. This will include development of two further public flyers and provision of first stage risk assessment and adaptation options reports, all earmarked for Council consideration or public release in December 2023.

Signatories

Author:

Jonathan Rowe - Programme Manager, South Dunedin Future

Authoriser:

Nicola Morand - Manahautū (General Manager Māori Partnerships and Policy)(Acting)

David Ward - Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

SDF Programme Strategic Intent (Current)

77

b

SDF Programme Strategy (Proposed)

78

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the social well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

This decision promotes the economic well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

This decision promotes the environmental well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

This decision promotes the cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The SDF Programme is a horizontal initiative, working across a range of vertical strategies, groups, and budgets in both DCC and ORC. This horizontal focus is intended to drive greater strategic coherence across Councils’ strategies and operations regarding South Dunedin, particularly those with a direct climate change dimension. As such, the programme has links to a wide range of strategic objectives. These are described in the paper and attachments, which build on previous advice on strategy and policy considerations, provided in the following reports:

 

·    South Dunedin Future – Programme Update, Item 8, DCC Council, 23 November 2021

·    South Dunedin Future – Interim Update, Item 8, Planning & Environment Committee, 4 April 2022

·    South Dunedin Future – Programme Plan, Item 9, Planning & Environment Committee, 6 July 2022

·    South Dunedin Future – Programme Update, Item 9, Strategy, Planning & Engagement Committee, 14 August 2023

Māori Impact Statement

Accurately reflecting and integrating the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and Crown’s partnership with Māori, is a central element of the SDF Programme. This is currently envisaged to include governance arrangements, aligning strategic objectives with te ao Māori, matauraka Māori, and mana whenua aspirations; providing meaningful opportunities for all Māori to input their views and values; and identifying and agreeing Māori-specific programme outputs. These are described in the paper and attachments.

Sustainability

Sustainability will be a central component of the SDF Programme as it seeks to develop climate change adaptation options for South Dunedin over short-, medium- and long-term timeframes. This work will be integrated with the wider climate change work programme, including aligning with DCC’s Emissions Management and Reduction Plan 2022 and Zero Carbon Plan 2023.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The programme management team and core programme actions within the SDF Programme have dedicated resourcing in the 2021-2031 10-Year Plan. Programme activities and projects (i.e. programme-related initiatives managed by other DCC or ORC teams) are subject to the planning and budgeting processes of those teams. The expectation is these activities and projects will be aligned with the infrastructure strategy (if/as appropriate). Programme planning will be aligned with the development of the 2024-2034 10-Year Plan, including the infrastructure strategy.

Financial considerations

The DCC’s portion of the SDF Programme budget is $507,000 per annum, which has been resourced in the 2021-2031 10-Year Plan. ORC’s portion is $420,000 per annum, which has been resourced in the 2023/24 Annual Plan. Additional grant funding of $1.45 million over two years (2023-24) has been allocated from the Department of Internal Affairs’ “Better Off” allocation.

Significance

This issue is considered high in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Community engagement will be a central element of the SDF Programme, and extensive engagement is planned in future stages, in accordance programme plan and with relevance council polices.

Engagement – external

Extensive external engagement has been undertaken on the SDF Programme between 2020-23, as outlined in the paper. Regular engagement is also undertaken with central government, local government, and other interest groups.

Engagement - internal

A large number of internal individuals, teams, and departments across DCC and ORC have been engaged in development of the SDF programme strategy and related work described in this report. This includes, but is not limited to, the departments listed in Figure 2 of the Programme Plan (Page 63, link).

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no anticipated legal/health and safety risks associated with this report. Risks relating to the SDF Programme are described in the Programme Plan (Page 71, link).

Conflict of Interest

There are no conflicts of interest to declare with this report.

Community Boards

Community boards have not been involved with the development of this report.

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 



Council

28 November 2023

 



Council

28 November 2023

 

 

National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-Making - Submission

Department: City Development

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report seeks approval of the Dunedin City Council (DCC) submission (attachment A) on the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making 2023. Feedback to the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) on the NPS-NHD was due on 20 November 2023; however, MfE have been notified that the DCC will be making a late submission (on 29th of November). 

2          The proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making 2023 (NPS-NHD) is part of the Government’s proposed work programme to address natural hazard risk and aims to “provide direction to decision-makers on the appropriate weight to attach to natural hazard risk in planning decisions relating to new development under the Resource Management Act 19911”.

3          The attached submission outlines the context for the management of natural hazards in Dunedin and provides comments in response to the questions asked in the discussion document accompanying the NPS, as well as suggestions regarding specific aspects of the proposals. 

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Approves the DCC submission, with any amendments, to the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard-decision making 2023.

b)        Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial changes to the submission if required.

 

BACKGROUND

 

4          National Policy Statements have the purpose of stating objectives and purposes for matters of national significance.

5          The proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making 2023 (NPS-NHD) aims to direct decision-makers to take a risk-based approach to natural hazards when making planning decisions (resource consents, designations, and changes to the District Plan) relating to new development. The discussion document explains that the NPS-NHD is intended as an ‘interim measure’ while the government develops a more comprehensive ‘National Direction for Natural Hazards’. The NPS-NHD, once in place, would have immediate effect in order to limit development in areas that are at high risk from natural hazards.  

6          The proposed NPS-NHD and discussion document are available online on the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) website: Proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making 2023 | Ministry for the Environment.

DISCUSSION

Strategic Context

7          The objectives and policies of the proposed NPS-NHD generally align with the approach taken to managing natural hazard risk under the Second Generation District Plan for Dunedin (2GP).

Key points of the draft submission

8          The submission is supportive of the overall focus of the NPS-NHD and national direction on natural hazard risk management and seeks to inform the development of the comprehensive national direction as well as the NPS-NHD. 

9          The submission supports the risk-based and precautionary approach of the NPS-NHD and the strong direction to avoid new sensitive activities in areas of high natural hazard risk. The submission also supports the incorporation of Māori knowledge systems such as Mātauraka Māori into natural hazards risk and tolerance assessments.  

10        The submission notes that areas of Dunedin are vulnerable to natural hazards including from the effects of climate change. While agreeing with the broad focus of the NPS-NHD, the submission suggests that climate change should be explicitly referred to as a key factor in understanding risk. In addition, the submission considers that more guidance is needed on managing risk for existing development, noting that this could be addressed by the comprehensive national direction.  

11        The submission requests that greater clarity be provided over the use of terminology, and more guidance be provided to assist decision makers in determining and managing natural hazard risk, in particular the application of ‘tolerance’ and the ‘precautionary approach’. In addition, it is suggested that there be more guidance provided on determining appropriate mitigation measures.

OPTIONS 

 

OPTION ONE (RECOMMENDED OPTION) – APPROVE THE SUBMISSION 

 

12        Approve the draft Dunedin City Council submission to the Government on the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazards Decision-making. 

Advantages 

·            Supports collaboration with central government on managing natural hazard risk.  

·            Enables the DCC to be actively involved in the development of the Government’s direction on natural hazards through providing feedback on the proposed NPS-NHD and longer term National Direction on Natural Hazards. 

 

Disadvantages 

·            There are no identified disadvantages for this option.

 

OPTION TWO – DO NOT APPROVE THE SUBMISSION

 

13        Do not approve draft Dunedin City Council submission to the Government on the proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazards Decision-making. 

Advantages 

·            There are no identified advantages for this option. 

 

Disadvantages 

·            Missed opportunity to collaborate with central government on improving the way natural hazards are managed.  

 

NEXT STEPS

 

14        If Council approves the draft submission, staff will make any required amendments, seek signature by the Mayor, and send it to the Ministry for the Environment for consideration. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Paul Freeland - Principal Policy Advisor

Katie James - Policy Planner

Authoriser:

David Ward - Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Draft Submission on the Proposed National Policy Statement for Natural Hazard Decision-making

84

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the environmental well-being of communities and enables democratic local decision-making for communities in the present and for the future. This submission enables the DCC to support the intent of the proposed NPS-NHD while highlighting some concerns and potential improvements.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Consistent consideration of natural hazard risks when making planning decisions on new development will contribute to making better decisions on development in hazard-prone areas.

Māori Impact Statement

The proposed NPS-NHD has identified that a disproportionate amount of Māori land is exposed to natural hazard risk. Policy 7 requires that “tangata whenua values, interests, and aspirations are recognised and provided for, including through early engagement, when making decisions on new development on specified Māori land where there is a high or moderate natural hazard risk.”

Sustainability

The proposed NPS-NHD will contribute to social, economic and environmental sustainability by providing a consistent framework for the assessment and management of natural hazard risk.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications for LTP/Levels of Service.

Financial considerations

If the proposed NPS-NHD results in changes to the 2GP that needs to use the Schedule 1 RMA process, then there may be the cost of a plan change unless that plan change can be incorporated with other proposed changes to the 2GP.

Significance

The decision is considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement in the development of the submission.

Engagement - internal

This submission has been led by the City Development Team with input from the Resource Consents, South Dunedin Future, Māori, Partnerships and Policy teams.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The DCC submission is likely to be of interest to all communities in Dunedin, including those served by Community Boards.

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 










Council

28 November 2023

 

 

Right of Way Easement over part Dunedin Town Belt for 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report discusses an application by Geoffrey Craig Miller and Allan Ronald Mackersy (the Applicants) for the partial surrender of an existing Right of Way easement and grant of a new Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve.

2          The Applicants own the property at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin and have proposed changes to the development on the land, which will affect their existing vehicular access through the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve. 

3          This report seeks approval to the partial surrender of the existing Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve, so that a boundary adjustment can be undertaken and a replacement Right of Way easement can be registered over the same part of the Dunedin Town Belt.

4          The decision by the Council is in its capacity as the administering body under the Reserves Act 1977 and as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate in regards to easements over reserves.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That Council:

a)         Acting in its capacity as the administering body of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve pursuant to the Reserves Act 1977:

i)          Approves the partial surrender of an existing vehicular Right of Way easement as it relates to Lot 2 DP 390403 (Instrument 8489286.2)

ii)         Grants a Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve to land held as Lot 1 DP 575078 located at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin, subject to the conditions outlined in this report.

iii)        Approves increasing of the existing annual fee for the Right of Way from $1,265.00 including GST to $1,500.00 including GST for use of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve for access to the property at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin.

iv)       Decides that the criteria for exemption from public notification has been met.

b)        Acting under delegation from the Minister of Conservation dated 12 June 2013, and pursuant to section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977;

i)          Approves the partial surrender of an existing vehicular Right of Way easement as it relates to Lot 2 DP 390403 (Instrument 8489286.2) and

ii)         Consents to the grant of a Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve to land held as Lot 1 DP 575078 located at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin, subject to the conditions outlined in this report.

BACKGROUND

5          The Applicants have an existing approved Right of Way (shown in Attachment A) over a part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve created in May 2010.  This provides for vehicular access to their property at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin.

6          The Applicants have proposed changes to the development on this land as shown in Attachment B which will affect the status of the current Right of Way easement. The changes to the development include:

a)         Boundary adjustments with a neighbouring property that will formalise the ‘on the ground’ situation. This means that the boundaries of Lot 2 DP 390403 and Lot 1 DP 311917 will be adjusted.

b)        Amalgamation of land with the neighbouring property, which means Lot 2 DP 390403 will merge with Lot 3 DP 311917. The amalgamated lots will receive a new land appellation as Lot 1 DP 575078.

7          In order to facilitate the changes to the development above, the Applicants have proposed the following:

a)         A partial surrender of the existing vehicular Right of Way easement as it relates to Lot 2 DP 390403.

b)        Completion of the boundary adjustment and amalgamation within the new development.

c)         A new vehicular Right of Way easement is registered in favour of the new Lot 1 DP 575078 as shown in Attachments C and D.

8          The same Right of Way easement also provides for access to a neighbouring property at 133 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin. The Applicants will be required to obtain all consents required, at the Applicants’ own cost, in order for the steps outlined above to progress.

9          The Applicants have gained resource consents SUB 2021-287 and LUC 2021-720 for development on the land.

10        The Applicants have provided written confirmation that they will meet all legal and associated costs related to these Right of Way dealings, all annual charges for the Right of Way easement, all other costs in respect of the vehicular easement including ongoing maintenance obligations, and facilitate the requirements for the partial surrender and subsequent creation of the new easement without undue delay in line with Council’s approval.

DISCUSSION

11        The Council, in its capacity as administering body of the reserve, has the responsibility for ensuring compliance with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977 and to consider the merits of the request for a grant of easements.

12        The Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve adjacent to 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin is a reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977 and is recorded in Record of Title OT301/116.

Reserves Act 1977

13        Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 provides the statutory authority for the grant of right of way easements over reserves.

14        Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 requires public notification of the intention to grant an easement unless it can be demonstrated that:

a)    the reserve is vested in an administering body and is not likely to be materially altered or permanently damaged; and

b)    the rights of the public in respect of the reserve are not likely to be permanently affected by the establishment and lawful exercise of the easement. 

15        The area in which the easement is located has been used for vehicle access to the property since at least May 2010. As such, it is not used by the general public and does not form part of a park or reserve area where the public may congregate.  Its appearance is that of a vehicle accessway.

16        This means that the reserve is not likely to be further materially altered or permanently damaged by the accessway. The rights of the public in respect of the wider reserve are not likely to be permanently affected by the establishment and lawful exercise of the easement, particularly given that there is no public use of the area.

17        The effects on the Reserve in future of any general maintenance or repair work to the easement area for access will only be temporary, given that this is the only vehicular access to residential units on the development land.

18        Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 empowers the reserve's administering body (the Council), to grant easements over reserve lands subject to the Resource Management Act and the consent of the Minister of Conservation.  The Minister of Conservation has delegated powers of consent to the Council, without limitation under instrument of delegation dated 12 June 2013.

Reserve Management Plan General Policies (March 2005)

19        The Reserve Management Plan General Policies provides for formalisation of existing accessways over reserves.  Rights of way may be granted over reserves if they do not prevent the use of the reserve for its primary purpose, which in this instance is a Recreation Reserve. The policies also require the applicant to meet all costs associated with legalising and maintaining the right of way. 

20        The General Policies specify that easements should be for a limited term and provides for annual charges to be payable. In this instance however, Council Officers recommend that the Right of Way easement proposed be granted in perpetuity, and that the current annual charge be increased from $1,265.00 including GST to $1,500.00 including GST. This charge is in acknowledgement of the clear private benefit derived from the ability to utilise the public reserve land for access.

Easement terms and conditions

21        It is proposed that the end outcome is that a new vehicular Right of Way easement is granted over a part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve adjacent to 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin in favour of Geoffrey Craig Miller (1/2 share) and Allan Ronald Mackersy and Geoffrey Craig Miller (1/2 share as executors) (the Applicants) on the condition that the Applicants must meet all costs associated with the survey and legal costs of formalising and registering the easement. This includes the costs of ongoing maintenance, which shall not be the responsibility of the Council and the payment of the annual charge.

22        The proposed key elements of the easement would include:

Statute          Granted pursuant to section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 on Council's standard terms and conditions.

 

SCHEDULE OF PROPOSED EASEMENTS

Purpose

Shown

Servient Tenement

Dominant Tenement

Right of Way

‘A’

Part Town Belt, Town of Dunedin (OT 301/116)

Lot 1 LT 575078

(RT: 759737)

 

Term                        In perpetuity

Rental                     $1,500.00p.a. reviewable on a 3 yearly basis

 

23        The terms and conditions of the easement are to be finalised by the Council’s solicitors. As a first step, an agreement to partially surrender an easement and to grant an easement will be prepared by Council's solicitors which will include the following conditions:

a)         the Applicants will meet all costs associated with the proposal including survey and legal costs of formalising and registering the easement, the costs of ongoing maintenance (which shall not be the responsibility of the Council) and the payment of an annual charge;

b)        the Applicants will be responsible for obtaining all necessary approvals and consents required to complete this matter, including from any adjoining landowner/s.

24        The new easement will be registered against Council's title once the boundary adjustment work has been completed.

Merits of proposed easements

25        The access over the land which comprises the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve adjacent to 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin has been in use since at least 2010 when the existing Right of Way easement was registered. The requirements set out above are necessary to maintain the formal use for vehicle access by way of an easement. It is consistent with Council Policy and acknowledges the practical solution which is needed in this situation.

26        This matter needs to be dealt with, in the steps outlined, in order for the Applicants to comply with and give effect to the conditions of approval for SUB 2021-287 and LUC 2021-720.

Council as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate

27        The Council, as the Minister of Conservation’s delegate, has a supervisory role in ensuring that the decision on whether or not to grant the easement has been arrived at in compliance with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.  In particular, the Council as the Minister’s delegate, needs to be satisfied that the status of the land has been correctly identified, that there is statutory power to grant the easements, that the necessary statutory processes have been followed, that the classification has been appropriately considered, and the decision is a reasonable one.

OPTIONS (Acting as REGISTERED OWNER AND ADMINISTERING BODY OF DUNEDIN TOWN BELT RECREATION RESERVE)

Option One – Recommended option 

28        Council, acting as the administering body for the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve, pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977 ;

a)         Approves the partial surrender of an existing vehicular Right of Way easement as it relates to Lot 2 DP 390403 (Instrument 8489286.2) and

b)        Grants a Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve to land held as Lot 1 DP 575078 located at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin, on the terms and conditions outlined in this report.

c)         Approves increasing of the existing annual fee for use of the Right of Way for vehicle access to the property at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin from $1,265.00 including GST to $1,500.00 including GST.

Advantages

·    Formalises an existing access situation which provides access to a number of residential units and is in line with Council’s General Policies for reserves management.

·    The proposed easement is unlikely to impact on the public’s use of the reserve and satisfies consent conditions of SUB 2021-287 and LUC 2021-720 and

·    Allows the developer to complete boundary adjustments within the development property served by the vehicular accessway.

Disadvantages

·    There are no material disadvantages. The situation on the ground has existed since at least 2010 and been authorised by a formal registered Right of Way easement. The easement has not limited public recreational use of the wider reserve in this location.

Option Two – Status Quo

29        Do not approve the partial surrender of the existing vehicular Right of Way easement and do not grant a new Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve to land held as Lot 1 DP 575078 located at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin

Advantages

·    No material advantages

Disadvantages

·    Does not satisfy the conditions in the approved consents SUB 2021-287 and LUC 2021-720.

·    Does not recognise the long history of use and the practical requirements for vehicular access to the residential units which this access point provides.

·    It would require the Applicant to cease plans to adjust Lot boundaries to accurately record the occupation area within his development.

OPTIONS (ACTING UNDER DELEGATION FROM THE MINISTER OF CONSERVATION)

Option One – recommended option

30        Acting under its delegation from the Minister of Conservation dated 12 June 2013 and pursuant to Section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977;

a)         Approves the partial surrender of an existing vehicular Right of Way easement as it relates to Lot 2 DP 390403 (Instrument 8489286.2) and

b)        Grants a Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve to land held as Lot 1 DP 575078 located at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin, on the terms and conditions outlined in this report.

c)         Approves increasing of the existing annual fee for use of the Right of Way for access to the property at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin from $1,265.00 GST incl. to $1,500.00 GST incl.

Advantages

·    Formalises an existing access situation which provides access to a number of residential units and is in line with Council’s General Policies for reserves management.

·    The proposed easement is unlikely to impact on the public’s use of the reserve and satisfies consent conditions of SUB 2021-287 and LUC 2021-720 and

·    Allows the developer to complete boundary adjustments within the development property served by the vehicular accessway.

Disadvantages

·    There are no material disadvantages. The situation on the ground has existed since at least 2010 and been authorised by a formal registered Right of Way easement. The easement has not limited public recreational use of the wider reserve in this location.

Option Two – Status Quo

31        Do not approve the partial surrender of the existing vehicular Right of Way easement and do not grant a new Right of Way easement over part of the Dunedin Town Belt Recreation Reserve to land held as Lot 1 DP 575078 located at 139 Harbour Terrace, Dunedin

Advantages

·    No material advantages

Disadvantages

·    To take this option, the Council (as the Minister’s delegate) would need to determine the reasons that the Reserves Act 1977 has not been fully complied with and/or the decision to grant the easement is not a reasonable one.

NEXT STEPS

32        If Council approves the recommended option, it is proposed that an agreement to partial surrender of right of way easement and to the granting of a new right of way easement be prepared and executed, to allow the Applicants to proceed with the boundary adjustments without delay.

Signatories

Author:

Owen Graham - Senior Leasing and Land Advisor

Authoriser:

Scott MacLean - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Jeanette Wikaira - General Manager Community Services (Acting)

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Current Right of Way over DCC reserve

103

b

Draft LT Plan 575078 showing Lot boundary changes

105

c

New Lot 1 DP 575078

106

d

New Right of Way over DCC reserve

107

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision relates to ensuring the provision of legal access to private property over an existing ROW easement and is considered a pragmatic solution to the problem encountered.

 

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

This decision supports the economic, environmental, social and physical well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Māori Impact Statement

Māori.

Sustainability

An appropriately developed vehicle access is already in place and has been since 2010. This matter ensures the continued formalisation of that ROW.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications from this proposal for the LTP or the Annual Plan. There are no implications for current levels of service or performance measures.

Financial considerations

The applicant is required to meet all costs associated with the survey and legal costs of formalising and registering the easement as well as on-going maintenance costs and the annual charge.

Significance

The decision has been assessed as being of low significance being mainly an administrative function

Engagement – external

No external consultation has been undertaken. There has been considerable discussion with the developer’s consultants.

Engagement - internal

The Council’s Legal Team has provided advice in relation to the appropriate processes required and Reserves Act requirements. There has also been discussion with the City Planning Subdivision Planner/Surveyor.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are considered to be no material risks associated with the easement decisions.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest within Council.

Community Boards

The subject area is not located in a Community Board area.

 

 



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28 November 2023

 

 

Residents' Opinion Survey Quarterly Update: July - September 2023 quarter

Department: Corporate Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides a summary of the Residents’ Opinion Survey (ROS) quarterly results (the Quarterly results) (Attachment A). This is the second of the three quarterly update reports to be presented to the Strategy, Planning and Engagement Committee (the Committee).

2          The Quarterly results show a comparison between the April-June 2023 quarter and the July-September 2023 quarter.

3          The Quarterly results show quarter-on-quarter changes in:

·    residents’ overall satisfaction and dissatisfaction with 10 DCC services/facilities areas

·    residents’ overall satisfaction with five aspects of the DCC and elected members.

4          Due to there being no statistically significant change found in satisfaction/dissatisfaction ratings, the results are a general indication only.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Notes the Residents’ Opinion Survey quarterly update for the period July – September 2023.

 

BACKGROUND

5          The ROS is a monitoring tool utilised by the DCC to collect statistically reliable results on residents’ satisfaction with DCC services and facilities and perceptions of Council performance. It has been commissioned by the DCC every year since 1994 in varying forms and provides an annual snapshot.

6          On 13 February 2023, the Strategy, Planning and Engagement Committee requested quarterly updates on ROS.

7          This report is the second of the quarterly updates. The final quarterly report is scheduled for March 2024.

8          The Quarterly results have been prepared by GravitasOPG in consultation with Corporate Policy.

9          The current five-year contract with GravitasOPG ends with the delivery of a 2023/24 annual survey results (ending 30 June 2024).

DISCUSSION

The ROS methodology and quarterly sample size

10        The annual ROS is based on a sample of randomly selected residents aged 18 years and over from the electoral roll, with a target sample size of 1,200 residents each year. Participation is voluntary.

11        The sample size for the July-September 2023 quarter was 364, ranging from 105 to 361 across 15 questions. The wide range of sample sizes could be due to any of the following three reasons:

·        The answer was ‘’Don’t know”, which was not included in the analysis.

·        A question was left unanswered, regardless of whether it was on purpose or an oversight.

·        The question ‘10. Handling enquiries’ was only asked if a respondent indicated in the previous question that they had contacted with DCC staff in the last three months.

12        The samples are weighted to known population distributions based on the 2018 Census data for age, gender, ethnicity, and location. This is to reduce sample bias. Like the ROS annual results, the Quarterly results are statistically tested. Statistically significant differences are denoted with green and red arrows for an increase and decrease, respectively. The results have a margin of error of +/- 5.1%, similar to the previous quarter +/- 5.2%. It is important to note that the Quarterly results have a greater margin of error because of its much smaller sample sizes, compared to around +/- 2.6% for annual results.

13        Caution is needed when considering any other increase or decrease in satisfaction ratings that are not statistically significant, as they are not reliable.

Clarification on terms

14        ‘Statistically significant’ means a result is unlikely due to a random chance in sampling and is likely due to some factor of interest (e.g., a meaningful change that requires attention).

15        It is helpful to understand that there is a strong relationship between determining what is statistically significant, the sample size and margin of error. As the sample size increases, the margin of error (i.e., uncertainty) decreases. This is why, in a large sample size, a small percentage change could be deemed as significant as the level of uncertainty (margin of error) is small. The change (even if it is small) is deemed significant as the change is likely due to a factor of interest. On the other hand, in a smaller sample size, a large change may fail to be deemed significant due to a greater level of uncertainty. For example, a large percentage change for question ‘10: Handling enquiries’ has been deemed not statistically significant due to its small sample size and a greater margin of error.

Finding of ROS quarterly results: July-September 2023 quarter

16        Due to there being no statistically significant change found in satisfaction/dissatisfaction ratings, the results are a general indication only.

17        There was an indication of increasing trends for overall satisfaction with five of the 10 DCC services/facilities areas and of decreasing trends for another five areas. As for overall satisfaction with the five aspects of the DCC and elected members, three showed decreasing trends, two showed increasing trends, and one remained unchanged.

OPTIONS

18        There are no options as this is a report for noting.

NEXT STEPS

19        Staff will work with GravitasOPG to provide the Strategy, Planning and Engagement Committee with the next quarterly update report at its meeting in April 2024.

Signatories

Author:

Gina Huakau - Corporate Policy Manager

Nicola Morand - Manahautū (General Manager Māori Partnerships and Policy)(Acting)

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Dunedin Residents' Opinion Survey Quarterly Results Table July- September 2023 Quarter

115

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The ROS supports democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The ROS contributes to all aspects of the strategic framework as it gauges residents’ satisfaction with DCC services and performance.

Māori Impact Statement

The current ROS does not qualify to receive Māori decent electoral roll data under section 112 of the Electoral Act 1993. Where response rates are not proportional to the ōtepoti Dunedin population for Māori, the results are weighted to known population distributions based on the 2018 Census data to reduce sample size.

Sustainability

The ROS asks about residents’ perception of Dunedin as a sustainable city, and whether the DCC is leader in encouraging the development of a sustainable city.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The ROS asks about residents’ satisfaction with the ‘value for money’ of the services provided by the DCC.

Financial considerations

There are no direct financial considerations.

Significance

The significance of this report is low, in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, as it is for noting only.

Engagement – external

The ROS is a form of external engagement.

Engagement - internal

The ROS results are available to management and staff monthly. Reporting of the ROS results will be considered as part of future work on non-financial reporting, levels of service, and Strategic Framework Refresh.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The ROS asks about overall satisfaction with performance of Community Board members.

 

 



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28 November 2023

 




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28 November 2023

 

 

Customer and Regulatory Issues and Trends Report

Department: Customer and Regulatory, Customer Services Agency and Community and Planning

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          Please see the attached Customer and Regulatory Issues and Trends report to 30 September 2023.

2          As this report is an administrative report only, there are no options or Summary of Considerations.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

 

a)         Notes the Customer and Regulatory Issues and Trends Report.

 

Signatories

Author:

Paul Henderson - Building Services Manager

Ros MacGill - Manager Compliance Solutions

Hayley Browne - Customer Services Manager

Alan Worthington - Resource Consents Manager

Authoriser:

Claire Austin - General Manager Customer and Regulatory

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Customer and Regulatory Issues and Trends Report

119

 

 



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28 November 2023

 





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28 November 2023

 

 

Proposed Event Road Closures - December 2023 to March 2024

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The DCC has received temporary road closure applications relating to the following events:

a)         Community Christmas Event

b)        Waitangi Day Celebrations

c)         Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon

d)        Pink Concert - Stadium

e)        Pink Concert – City Activation

f)         South Dunedin Street Festival

2          This report recommends that Council approves the temporary closure of the affected roads.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Resolves to close the roads detailed below (pursuant to Section 319, Section 342, and Schedule 10 clause 11(e) of the Local Government Act 1974 (LGA 1974)):

i)     Community Christmas Event

Dates and Times:

Sunday 10 December 2023, from 1.00pm to 9.30pm (contingency date 17 December 2023)

Road:

·    Lanark Street cul-de-sac, from Irvine Street to the end

 

ii)    Waitangi Day Celebrations

Date and Times:

Tuesday 6 February 2024, from 9.00am to 3.00pm

Road:

·    The Octagon Central Carriageway, between Princes Street and George Street

 

iii)  Weet-Bix Kids TRYathlon

Date and Time:

Sunday 3 March 2024, from 6.30am to 1.30pm

Roads:

·    Factory Road, from High Street to Church Street

·    High Street, from Factory Road to Green Street

·    Green Street, from Church Street to High Street

·    Church Street, from Factory Street to Green Street

 

iv)   Pink Concert - Stadium

Dates and Times:

Monday 4 March 2024, from 7.00am to Wednesday 6 March, 12.00 noon

Road:

·    Anzac Avenue, between Union Street and Butts Road

 

Dates and Times:

Tuesday 5 March 2024, from 3.00pm to 12.00 midnight

 

Roads:

·    Anzac Avenue, between State Highway 88 and Ravensbourne Road

·    Albany Street, between Forth Street and Anzac Avenue

·    Union Street, between Harbour Terrace and Anzac Avenue

·    Butts Road, entire length

·    Logan Park Drive, entire length.

·    Minerva Street, from Anzac Avenue to Parry Street West

·    Parry Street West, from Minerva Street to end.

·    Riego Street, from Albany Street to Forth Street

 

v)    Pink Concert – City Activation

Dates and Times:

Tuesday 5 March 2024, from 9.00am to Wednesday 6 March, 05.00am

 

Roads:

·    Lower Octagon, between George Street and Lower Stuart Street

·    Lower Stuart Street, between the Octagon and Moray Place 

 

Note: Bath Street will remain open.

 

vi)   South Dunedin Street Festival

Dates and Times:

Saturday 16 March 2024, from 7.30am to 4.30pm

Roads:

·    King Edward Street, between Hillside and Macandrew Roads

·    Lorne and McBride Streets, between Rankeilor and King Edward Streets

·    Sullivan and Carey Avenues, between Glasgow and King Edward Streets

BACKGROUND

3          Events support Council’s 10 Year Plan goal of a successful city with a diverse, innovative, and productive economy and a hub for skill and talent. 

4          The area proposed to be used for these events is legal road and can therefore be temporarily closed to normal traffic if statutory temporary road closure procedures are followed. The procedures are set out in Section 319 of the LGA 1974 and give Council the power to stop or close any road (or part of a road) within the parameters of Section 342 and Schedule 10 of the LGA 1974 (Schedule 10 is included as Attachment A).

5          These procedures include:

·        Consultation with Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency) and the Police.

·        Public notice being given of the proposal to close any road (or part of a road), and public notice of a decision to close the road.

·        Council being satisfied that traffic is not likely to be unreasonably impeded.

6          A resolution of Council is required where a proposal to temporarily close a road relates to public functions.

7          Council is required to give public notice of its decision. This notice will be published after this meeting and prior to the event, if approved.

DISCUSSION

Consultation and Notification

8          The Police and Waka Kotahi have no objections to the proposed road closures.

9          On Saturday 21 October 2023, the proposed temporary road closure were advertised in the Otago Daily Times (Attachment B) with a deadline for feedback.

10        The event organisers contacted those considered affected prior to submitting their application, and no objections were received.  

11        Schedule 10 section 11(e) states a road cannot be closed more than 31 days in the aggregate in any one year.  This limit will not be exceeded by the approval of the proposed temporary road closures.

Traffic Impacts 

12        The locations of these events have had identical road closures for the same, or similar event (s) in prior years without causing unreasonable delays to the travelling public.

13        Emergency Services and Public transport services will be managed through the temporary traffic management process.

14        The temporary traffic management plan process ensures that other issues such as temporary relocation of certain parking (e.g. taxi, mobility and Authorised Vehicles only) are managed.

OPTIONS

15        Any amendment to this report’s recommendations cannot be implemented without further consultation with the affected parties, Waka Kotahi, the Police, and verifying that traffic impacts are acceptable.

Option One – Recommended Option

 

16        That the Council closes the sections of road as recommended in this report. 

Advantages

·        The roads will be able to be closed and the event will be able to proceed.

·        The closure will assist in realising the economic, social, and cultural benefits associated with the event.

Disadvantages

·        There will be temporary loss of vehicular access through the closed areas.  However, there are detours available, and safety can be assured using temporary traffic management.

Option Two – Status Quo

17        That the Council decides not to close the roads in question.

Advantages

·        There would be no detour required for travelling public, and the roads would be able to be used as normal.

Disadvantages

·        The events would not be able to go ahead, and the benefits of the events would be lost.

NEXT STEPS

18        Should the resolution be made to temporarily close the roads, Council staff will accept the temporary traffic management plans for the events and notify the public of the closures.

Signatories

Authoriser:

David Ward - Acting General Manager Infrastructure and Development

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Local Government Act 1974, Schedule 10

128

b

ODT Advert - 21 October 2023

133

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the social and economic well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

Events contribute to the Strategic Framework. Events contribute to the Economic Development Strategy, the Social Wellbeing Strategy. There is a Festival and Events Plan 2018-2023.

Māori Impact Statement

Mana whenua have not been directly engaged with in relation to these road closures.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications, the decision is a regulatory one and there are no direct costs to Council.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications.  The cost of the proposed road closure is not a cost to Council.

Significance

This decision is considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been external engagement as required by the LGA 1974, with the Police and Waka Kotahi. Affected parties were notified and provided a time period for feedback.

Engagement - internal

There has been engagement with DCC Events, In-House Legal, and Transport.  There is support for the events to proceed.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks should the recommended resolution be made.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


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28 November 2023

 






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28 November 2023

 

 

Funding Options - Kerbside Collection Service

Department: Waste and Environmental Solutions and Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          As part of the 10 year plan 2021-2031, Council resolved to introduce a new kerbside collection service consisting of four bins estimated to cost between $270 - $310 per year, per household, and an optional garden waste bin that would cost an additional $140 - $180 each year.  The new service will commence in July 2024. 

2          In response to a request from Council, this report outlines options for both flat and progressive targeted rates to fund this new kerbside collection service.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council

a)     Funds the new kerbside collection service from 1 July 2024 using a flat targeted rate (the current rating method).

 

BACKGROUND

3          The Council currently provides refuse collection via pre-paid bags purchased at various retail outlets.  The black bags are collected along with a kerbside recycling collection service.

4          The current kerbside collection service is funded by a flat targeted rate of $106.10 per annum.  Most properties are charged the flat rate of $106.10 for every separately used or inhabited part (SUIP).  Commercial properties are charged the flat rate of $106.10 for each individual rating unit. 

5          The following table provides a summary of the number of Kerbside targeted rates charged by differential category. The base indicates how the rate is currently charged.

Differential

Base

Accounts

Residential

SUIP

49,306

Residential Institution

SUIP

167

Lifestyle

SUIP

1,696

Residential Heritage B&B

SUIP

2

Commercial

Rating Unit

301

Farmland

SUIP

203

Total

 

51,675

 

6          This rate is only paid by properties that receive the service. Certain schools and small business are the only commercial properties that receive the kerbside recycling service. Residential, lifestyle and farmland properties only pay this charge if they live in an area that receives the service.

7          Unless specified, all rating figures in this report are GST inclusive.

8          The Dunedin City Council is introducing a new kerbside collection service in July 2024. The new service is summarised below:

i)          Existing - Glass crate (blue)– collected fortnightly

ii)         Existing - Recycling wheelie bin (yellow lid) – collected fortnightly

iii)        New - Refuse wheelie bin replacing the current pre-paid refuse bags (red lid) – collected fortnightly

iv)        New - Food scraps/garden waste bin (green lid) – collected weekly

v)         New - Garden waste bin – collected fortnightly – optional

9          At the Council meeting on 27 January 2021, Council resolved as follows:

Moved (Mayor Aaron Hawkins/Cr Christine Garey)

That the Council:

a)        Requests, in time for the next Annual Plan 2022-2023, a report outlining options for both flat and progressive targeted rates for the kerbside collection service.

b)        Ask staff to report back on the development of Pay as You Throw technology, as part of each Annual Plan process.

Motion carried (CNL/2021/018)

10       At the Annual Plan Council meeting on 31 January 2022, Council considered a report which responded to part (a) of the resolution, referencing the terms “flat” and “progressive” targeted rates, and resolved as follows:

Moved (Cr Mike Lord/Mayor Aaron Hawkins):

That the Council:

Requests in time for the next Annual Plan 2023/24, a report outlining options for both flat and progressive targeted rates for the kerbside collection service.

             Motion carried (CAPACC/2022/009)

11        The commencement of the new kerbside collection service was delayed to 1 July 2024 and this report has been held for consideration as part of the 10 year plan 2024-34.

DISCUSSION

12        The Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 (the Act) sets out the different rates that may be used to pay for council activities.  Targeted rates are primarily used to charge for services that are provided to a defined group of ratepayers.  Council currently uses targeted rates to pay for its kerbside collection services, as not all areas of Dunedin receive this service.

Targeted rates

13        Schedule 3 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 provides a list of factors that can be used to charge targeted rates. Among the factors are:

a)         rating unit value eg: capital value (CV)

b)        the number of separately used or inhabited parts (SUIP)

c)         per rating unit

14        The Act allows a combination of factors to be used as well as different bases for different categories, for example, a rate based on capital value for commercial and SUIP for residential properties.

15        The 10 year plan 2021-31 estimated that a flat rate for the new service would cost between $270-$310 per household.  The targeted rate for the first year of the new kerbside collection service will be confirmed in January 2024, but it is estimated to be between $320-$340.

16        This report provides three options for funding the new kerbside collection service; a flat rate, a progressive targeted rate and a combination of both. 

17        A sample rates table has been provided to illustrate the estimated rates for residential and lifestyle properties for the new service.  The sample rates are based on an assumed flat rate of $330 to show the impact of the various options as follows:

·    Option 1 - is the current ‘flat rate’ where all ratepayer pay the same amount for the service provided.

·    Option 2 – the charge for kerbside collection is calculated on a capital value basis.

·    Option 3 – provides a combination of both a flat rate and a capital value based rate.  Three examples of a combined rate are shown in the table below,

§ Option 3a - flat rate of $33 and the balance calculated on capital value

§ Option 3b – flat rate of $106.10 (the current 2023/24 rate) and the balance calculated on capital value

§ Option 3c – flat rate of $247.50 and the balance calculated on capital value.

18        Total income collected is the same for each option - what does change is who pays what.

19        The options exclude the optional garden waste bin that would be funded separately on a user pays basis.


 

 

Sample rates

 

 

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3a

Option 3b

Option 3c

CV

(Recommended Option)

SUIP $330

CV

SUIP $33.00        & CV

SUIP $106.10     & CV

SUIP $247.50     & CV

Residential

 

$

$

$

$

$

Example

345,000

330.00

178.37

193.43

226.85

292.01

Example

490,000

330.00

253.33

260.85

277.60

310.71

Mode

530,000

330.00

274.01

279.45

291.60

315.87

Median

590,000

330.00

305.03

307.35

312.60

323.61

Average

652,000

330.00

337.08

336.18

334.40

331.61

Example

740,000

330.00

382.58

377.10

365.10

342.96

Example

910,000

330.00

470.47

456.15

424.60

364.89

Lifestyle

 

$

$

$

$

$

Median

1,140,000

330.00

589.38

563.10

505.10

394.56

Example

1,410,000

330.00

728.97

688.65

599.60

429.36

 

20        If Council decides to change from the current rating method of a flat rate, the change and its impacts will require consultation as part of the 10 year plan 2024-34.  If the flat rate is retained, consultation is not required but the CD will contain information about the new service.

OPTIONS

Option One – Current Rating Method – charge a flat rate (Recommended Option)

21        Under the current rating method, the kerbside collection targeted rate for residential and lifestyle properties is charged as a flat rate per SUIP.

22        The impacts are:

·        All properties pay the same amount for the kerbside collection service. The amount paid is based on the number of SUIPs. This provides certainty of the cost of the service to all ratepayers.

·        A flat rate recognises that all ratepayers receive the same service/benefit.

·        The continued use of a flat targeted rate is in accordance with the rating method for kerbside collection that was adopted as part of the 10 year plan 2021-2031.

·        A flat rate which is currently used, is easily understood and communicated.

Option Two – Charge a progressive targeted rate calculated on capital value

23        Option two proposes charging the kerbside collection targeted rate for residential and lifestyle properties on a capital value basis.

24        The impacts are:

·        Residential and lifestyle properties pay different amounts for the same service.

·        Lower capital value properties pay less. 

·        Higher capital value properties pay more.

·        All properties receive the same benefit from the service, but do not pay the same amount. 

·        Communication with residents is more complicated. 

Option Three – A combination of a flat targeted rate and a progressive targeted rate

25        Option three charges two kerbside collection targeted rates to residential and lifestyle properties. One based on SUIP and one based on CV.

26        The impacts are:

•          Residential and lifestyle properties will pay different amounts for the same service.

•          Lower capital value properties pay less. 

·        Higher capital value properties pay more.

·        All properties receive the same benefit from the service, but do not pay the same amount. 

·        Communication with residents is more complicated. 

 

NEXT STEPS

27       If the recommended option of retaining a flat rate is approved, then no further work is required.

28        If one of the other options is preferred, staff will prepare a report for consideration in January 2024. Any proposed change will need to be consulted on as a part of the 10 year plan 2024-34. The consultation will need to include options.

 

Signatories

Author:

Chris Henderson - Group Manager Waste and Environmental Solutions

Carolyn Allan - Acting Chief Financial Officer

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the social and environmental well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The 10 year plan contributes to objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities, the community outcomes, and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The adoption of Te Taki Haruru – Māori Strategic Framework signals Council’s commitment to mana whenua and to its obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi.  Mana whenua and Māori have been involved in pre-engagement and will have an opportunity to engage with the 10 year plan consultation process through a series of planned hui.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan 2024-34 contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The proposed rating method will be incorporated into the 10 year plan 2024-34 supporting documentation and Consultation Document.

Financial considerations

The financial impacts are discussed in the report.

Significance

There will be full engagement on the 10 year plan 2024-34, which will cover any issues of significance.

Engagement – external

While there has been no external engagement with other territorial authorities, research has been undertaken on current general rate differentials for the NZ metropolitan and provincial councils

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council are involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2024‑34.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Any decision on the rating method will be of interest to Community Boards.

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 

 

2024 New Zealand Masters Games Operational and Financial Update

Department: Events and Community Development

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report updates the Council on the operational and financial status of the biennial New Zealand Masters Games being run in Dunedin (3 – 11 February 2024).

2          Financially the 2024 New Zealand Masters Games is on track with 85.18% of budgeted revenue confirmed.  Registrations, open since 6 September 2023, are currently ahead of those received at the same time for the 2022 Games.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Notes the New Zealand Masters Games operational and financial update.

 

BACKGROUND

3          The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust’s Statement of Intent and Trust Deed require the Trust to report to Council prior to each Masters Games.

4          The Dunedin Masters Games (the Games) is the largest regularly occurring event in Dunedin.  The Games meets the Premier criteria within the city’s Festival’s and Events Plan, contributing to the DCC’s Social Wellbeing, Parks and Recreation and Economic Development Strategies.  Previous participants experience high levels of satisfaction with the event and their stay in Dunedin.

5          Masters Games is owned by New Zealand Masters Games Limited, and the DCC is one of two franchisees, the other is the Whanganui (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust.  New Zealand Masters Games Limited guarantees franchise rights for the biennial New Zealand Masters Games in Dunedin until the completion of the 2036 New Zealand Masters Games.  The franchise agreement guarantees three appointments from the Trust on the New Zealand Masters Games Limited Board.

6          As franchisee the DCC has delegated the Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust to manage the event.

7          Council has provided grant payments to the Trust of $57,376 (2022/23) and $114,752 (2023/24).  The annual grant covers costs for the Games Manager who is an employee of the DCC.  As the Trust is dependent on funding from sources outside Council for the successful financial management of the Games, much of the Manager’s role is to secure funding and attract competitors, who contribute to revenue through their registration fee.

DISCUSSION

8          The Trust approved the 2024 Masters Games budget at the beginning of 2022/23.  Monthly Board meetings have been held to monitor and closely manage the expenditure against the budget.

9          The level of expenditure is directly related to revenue sourced from grants, sponsorship, and registration fees.  The Trust is charged with ensuring that, at its completion, the Games will achieve at least a break-even result.

10        The main revenue stream from Games registration begins in September (prior to the February Games).  The Statement of Intent and Trust Deed state that the Trust is required to report to the Council prior to the Masters Games being run, confirming whether it has achieved 85% of the biennial Masters Games budgeted grants and sponsorship revenue.

11        Under the agreement with Council, if the Board has been unsuccessful in achieving 85% of the Games grants and sponsorship funding at the time this report is presented, the Trust will:

·        Revise the Games budget to reduce expenditure to achieve a break even result and/or request the DCC to underwrite the Games; or

·        Gain approval from the Council for it to underwrite the amount of the anticipated loss; or

·        Agree to cancel the Games.

12        The following is an update of funding activity as of 22 November 2023, three months out from the February 2024 event.

Grants and Sponsorship

13        The approved budget from Sponsorship is $324,128.  Currently 82.57% has been confirmed.  Funding has been confirmed as follows:

Sponsorship

Income

Budget

Confirmed

Dunedin City Council

172,128

172,128

Otago Community Trust

100,000

90,000

Other Sponsors

52,000

5,500 

Total

324,128

267,628

 

14        The Trust has budgeted $55,000 in grant revenue from Gaming Trusts, it has secured $55,330 (100.6%) to date.  Funding from Gaming Trusts is oversubscribed by community and sporting groups and securing funds has proven difficult.  The Trust continues to make applications.

Grants

Income

Budget

Confirmed

Bendigo Valley Sports and Charity

10,000

 

Callis Charitable Trust

5,000

5,000

Lion Foundation

7,000

5,000

NZ Community Trust

10,000

20,000

TAB NZ

10,000

 

Kiwi Gaming Foundation

3,000

 

Aotearoa Gaming Trust

10,000

13,330

Pub Charity

 

7,000

Grassroots Trust Central

 

5,000 

Total

55,000

55,330

15        The combination of grant and sponsorship revenue secured to date is $322,958, which represents 85.18% of the target Games budget of $379,128.  The Trust continues to seek sponsorship to achieve targets.

16        The Trust is continually monitoring expenses to ensure it does not exceed the budget.

Registration Fees

17        The following fees were approved by the Trust:

·        Early Bird                                              $70

·        Standard                                                         $100

·        Late                                                                   $130

·        Supporter                                             $45

 

18        The budget for registration revenue is $342,450, this is split into four categories: Early Bird, $223,100 (closing 30 November 2023), Standard, $57,500 (closing 11 January 2024), Late, $54,050 (close off dependant on sport), and Supporter, $7,800 (open until the completion of the Games).

19        The registration fees are an ‘at risk’ component of the budget, therefore the budget has been set based on participant numbers of 5,500.  As of 21 November 2023, there were 1,842 participant entries, which is tracking 417 ahead of the same time in 2021.  It should be noted there was a reluctance to register in 2021 due to COVID-19 impacts and restrictions. At the close of Early Bird registrations there will be a clearer idea of where registrations sit in comparison to events pre Covid.

20        The Trust is confident that the budget targets will be met, and registrations are tracking ahead of previous games. The Trust anticipates a surplus or break even result due to careful planning and organisation of the event and are currently not seeking an underwrite.

OPTIONS  - THere are no Options

NEXT STEPS

21        The Dunedin (New Zealand) Masters Games Trust will continue its management, event planning and delivery of the 2024 New Zealand Masters Games as delegated by the DCC.

Signatories

Author:

Vicki Kestila - Master Games Manager

Authoriser:

Jeanette Wikaira - General Manager Community Services (Acting)

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities, and this decision promotes the social and economic well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The New Zealand Masters Games contributes to three of the Council’s strategies.

Māori Impact Statement

In August 2022, Katrina Bryant was appointed to the Trust as a mana whenua representative for both Kāti Huirapa Rūnaka ki Puketeraki and Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou.  Ms Bryant’s appointment ensures the Trust is connected with mana whenua and provides a path for wider Māori input.

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications in noting this report.

Financial considerations

The DCC guarantees to underwrite the Games should it be required.

Significance

This report is considered low in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

The Games Manager regularly engages with; funders, suppliers, sporting organisations, Sporting Associations, service providers, volunteers, participants and other Masters Games organisers.

Engagement - internal

There has been no internal engagement.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

The New Zealand Masters Games implements its own Health and Safety policy and process in line with current legislation. 

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The Masters Games is of interest to all areas of the city as participants come from the community and events are held across the community. Information and updates will be shared widely throughout Community Board areas.

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 

 

General Rate Differentials

Department: Civic

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides a review of the general rates differential, that is, how the general rates is allocated across all ratepayers.  It seeks a decision from Council on what approach it wishes to take for preparation of the 2024/25 Rating Method report for the 10 year plan Council meeting in January 2024.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Decides for the purposes of preparing the 2024/25 Rating Method report for the Council meeting in January 2024, to combine the toursim/economic development targeted rate into the commercial general rate, and maintain all other current general rate differentials.

BACKGROUND

2          General rates fund a broad range of council activities. Of the total rates revenue budget for the 2023/24 year, 58% comes from the general rate and 42% comes from targeted rates. A summary is provided in the following table:

Table 1. Summary of total rates

2023/24 budget

$’000 excluding

GST

% of total

rates

General rates

118,040

58.0%

Targeted rates

Community services rate

5,618

2.8%

Kerbside recycling rate

4,768

2.3%

Citywide water rate

27,862

13.7%

Citywide drainage rate

46,142

22.7%

Tourism/economic development

500

0.2%

Other targeted rates

428

0.2%

Total rates

203,358

100%

 

3          This report reviews how the general rate is currently allocated across ratepayers. Due to the integrated nature of two targeted rates, Community Services and Tourism/Economic Development (economic), these will also be discussed. 

4          A future review may be progressed to citywide water and drainage rates, depending on the reform environment and any possible changes to the future of 3 Waters.

General Rate Differentials

5          The general rate is collected as a rate in the dollar on the capital value (CV) of each property. The Council sets the general rate differentially for six property categories:

·    Residential

·    Lifestyle

·    Commercial

·    Farmland

·    Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts (B&B)

·    Stadium: 10,000+ Seat Capacity

6          A differential, described as a factor, is the degree to which the rate (the cents in the dollar) on each category of property is higher or lower than a residential property. For example, the rate paid by a commercial property for the current year is 2.47 times more than the rate paid by a residential property.

7          A series of changes to the general rate differentials were made from 2009/10 through to the 2017/18 year.  No changes have been made since this time.  The series of changes included:

a)    Reducing the commercial factor to 2.5 (from 3.09 in 2009/10, completed in 2015/16)

 

b)    Reducing the farmland factor to 0.8 (from 0.9 in 2010/11, completed in 2015/16)

 

c)    Increasing the factor for commercial properties in Strath Taieri to 2.5 (from 1.0 in 2011/12,

completed in 2017/18).

 

d)    The introduction of the Tourism/Economic Development targeted rate in 2010.  This rate is discussed below.

8          In the 2023/24 year, the general rate factor and rate by category are as follows:

Category

Factor

Rate

Cent in $ per CV

Residential

1.00

0.2566

Lifestyle

0.95

0.2438

Commercial

2.47

0.6338

Farmland

0.80

0.2053

Residential Heritage B & B

1.75

0.4490

Stadium: 10,000+ Seat Capacity

0.20

0.0508

 

9          The effect of the differentials is that commercial properties (2.47) and residential heritage B &B properties (1.75) pay more general rates than would be expected under an undifferentiated capital value system, and all other categories pay less. For example, in 2023/24, the residential category of ratepayers contributed 60% of the general rate, despite comprising 72% of the capital value of the city. The table below shows the share of the general rate collected from each category compared to the capital value of each category.

 

Table 2. General rates and capital value by factor

Property category

General rate incl GST $000

General

rate %

Capital Value (CV)*

CV %

Residential

81,194

60%

31,642,095,700

72%

Lifestyle

7,467

6%

3,062,939,000

7%

Commercial

42,313

31%

6,755,754,700

15%

Farmland

4,628

3%

2,254,494,150

5%

Residential Heritage B & B

19

0%

4,300,000

0%

Stadium: 10,000+ Seat Capacity

127

0%

249,700,000

1%

Total

135,748

100%

43,969,283,550

100%

*Includes properties liable for 50% general rate

Sample properties

10        The table below provides a small sample list of property rates for the 2023/24 year. It shows for a selection of properties, general rates, targeted rates and total rates. The examples assume that residential and commercial properties are charged all rates, while farmland and lifestyle properties are charged general and community services rates only.

Table 3. Sample properties

Sample property rates including GST

Capital Value

General rates

Targeted rates

Total rates

Residential

Median value

590,000

1,514

1,418

2,932

Average value

652,000

1,673

1,418

3,091

Commercial

Median value

680,000

4,310

2,910

7,220

Average value

2,140,000

13,563

7,452

21,015

Farmland

Median value

800,000

1,642

112

1,754

Average value

1,690,000

3,469

112

3,581

Lifestyle

Median value

1,140,000

2,779

112

2,891

Average value

1,154,000

2,813

112

2,925

 

Community Services Targeted Rate

11        The community services targeted rate (CSTR) funds the Botanic Garden and part of the Parks and Reserves activity. Revenue from the CSTR is determined by the Council when the rate amount is set. In the 2023/24 year, the rate is $111.50. This, multiplied by the number of charges, is the revenue Council will receive from the CSTR.

12        The CSTR impacts on the amount of general rates collected. An increase in rates collected by the CSTR will be offset by a reduction in rates collected by the general rate. Conversely, a reduction in rates collected by the CSTR would be offset by an increase in rates collected by the general rate.

Tourism/Economic Development Targeted Rate

13        On 1 July 2010, the Council introduced a Tourism/Economic Development targeted rate (economic rate), to be paid by the commercial ratepayers.  Its purpose was to provide a mechanism to collect specific funding for the Economic Development activity, for specific projects in the future. The rate currently collects $500,000 per year excluding GST ($575,000 including GST), raised by a capital value based targeted rate paid by the commercial category of ratepayers.

14        When introduced, it was neutral to commercial ratepayers because it was offset by a reduction in the amount that the commercial category pays towards the general rate. The commercial property general rate and the economic rate combine to give a factor of 2.50.

15        As this targeted rate is neutral to commercial ratepayers, there are no identified benefits in keeping this rate.  If removed, the commercial general rate would increase by $500,000, and be charged on a capital value basis.  Commercial ratepayers would conversely not be charged the $500,000 targeted rate, which is also charged on a capital value basis.  It is recommended that this rate be removed. 

Stadium: 10,000+ Seat Capacity

16        The Stadium has rating differentials for its general rates and capital value based targeted rates. These were introduced in 2012/13 to moderate the rates burden on the Stadium, by setting the Stadium rates at specified amounts. The initial amount to be collected in the 2012/13 year was equivalent to the estimated total rates that the Council would have collected from the Stadium land if the Stadium had not been built. These were estimated to be $134,000 excluding GST. The rates have since been increased annually by an indexed amount.  For the 2023/24, the total revenue sought from the stadium is $197,000 including GST.


 

General Rate Shares

17        The following table shows the distribution of the capital value of properties in the city by category for the last two years as well as the share of general rates paid by category.

Table 4. General rate share

Category

2023-24

2022-23

Proportion of CV

General Rate %

Proportion of CV

General Rate %

Residential

72%

60%

71%

59%

Lifestyle

7%

6%

6%

5%

Commercial

15%

31%

16%

32%

Farmland

5%

3%

6%

4%

Residential Heritage B & B

0%

0%

0%

0%

Stadium: 10,000+ Seat Capacity

1%

0%

1%

0%

Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

18        The change in the share of the general rate between the two years reflects the 2022 revaluation.

19        The graph below shows the percentage share of the general rate paid by residential, commercial and other categories for the last six years.


 

DISCUSSION

Other New Zealand councils

20        For comparative purposes, a summary of general rate factors for metropolitan councils (populations exceeding 90,000) and provincial councils (populations between 20,000 and 90,000), is provided in Attachment A. The figures are taken from each council’s 2023/24 annual plan.  It is difficult to compare rates between councils, as each council uses different mixes of general and targeted rates to fund their activities. 

21        The New Zealand Taxpayers’ Union published the 2022 Ratepayers’ Report which includes average residential and non-residential rates for each council for the 2021/22 year. The rates are calculated using a standardised formula. Attachment B provides charts of average residential rates for metropolitan councils and all councils.

Commercial properties

22        The 10 year plan Rating Workstream reviewed the commercial general rate differential.  It compared the DCC commercial general rate differential with metropolitan councils as shown in Attachment A.  The comparison shows that DCC’s commercial differential of 2.46 is at the lower end of the scale, with the range of commercial differentials being between 3.70 to 2.10. 

23        Attachment A also shows a comparison of the DCC commercial differential with three provincial councils that have populations between 20,000 and 90,000.  The range of differential is between 5.41 and 1.0.  Council’s south of Dunedin, excluding Invercargill, do not have a commercial differential. 

24        Commercial properties have some tax advantages, where GST payable on rates can be claimed back, and rates are a tax-deductible expense.

25        Any decrease to the commercial differential would mean that all other properties would pay more.

Other factors considered

Short Term Visitor Accommodation (STVA)

26        The current rating method generally allows residential properties to be used for STVA while paying normal residential rates. Traditional commercial accommodation providers (hotels, motels, commercial B&B, etc) are required to pay commercial general rates (2.46 times the residential rate, 2.5 including the economic rate).

27        STVA properties can be classified into two groups, residential with incidental STVA use (e.g., less than 28 nights per year), and residential with more significant STVA use (e.g., entire property, use more than 28 nights per year). 

28        At its meeting on 14 December 2020, Council considered a report that looked at the possibility of a new general rate differential for residential properties with more significant STVA use.  However, the difficulties and cost in identifying and administering such a rate, outweighed the benefits that would arise from introducing a new rate differential.  A new differential was not supported.  The difficulties included:

a)         Identification of STVA properties - searching websites, e.g. online booking sites such as Airbnb, Bookabach and Holiday Houses.  Often the physical address of the property is not named in the listing and will only be provided when the accommodation is booked.

b)        Maintaining the list of properties – this would be an ongoing manual process, as properties could change their status at any time.

c)         Only official information sources can be used to assess rating valuation categories - a change to a property’s status from Residential to Residential STVA would require some form of official notification.  Legal advice suggests confirmation by owners of these properties by way of a statutory declaration.  However, there is no legal obligation on a property owner to complete such a declaration.

29        Updated legal advice shows that there is no change, and that the challenges identified in 2020 remain.  No change is recommended to the rating method for residential with more significant STVA use properties .

OPTIONS

30        From a financial perspective, any change in the general rate differentials or the introduction of a new rating category will not result in additional rates revenue for the Council.  The total amount of rates would remain the same but would be spread differently over the ratepayer base - some properties pay more, and some properties pay less.

31        Three options are provided as follows.

Option One – Status Quo

 

32        This option maintains the status quo as follows:

Category

Factor

Factor including economic rate

Residential

1.00

1.00

Lifestyle

0.95

0.95

Commercial

2.47

2.50

Farmland

0.80

0.80

Residential Heritage B & B

1.75

1.75

 

·    The stadium differential is inflation adjusted annually by an indexed amount.

·    The Tourism/economic rate remains in place at $500,000 per annum excluding GST. This and the commercial property general rate combine to give a factor of 2.5.

·    There will be no change in how residential properties being used for short-term visitor accommodation are rated.


 

Advantages

·    the current general rate differentials strike a balance, reflecting previous decisions of the Council, as being the right balance between property categories.

·    Certainty, particularly given the changes to property valuations and the impact this had on rates for the 2023/24 year.

Disadvantages

·        The need to administer a targeted rate that is not required, i.e., the tourism / economic development rate.

Option Two – Combine the tourism/economic development targeted rate with the commercial general rate, and all other differentials remain the same (Recommended Option)

33        Under this option, the only change to the status quo would be to combine the Tourism / economic development targeted rate with the commercial general rate. 

34        Using the 2023/24 budget, the rates collected from commercial ratepayers with this combination would be unchanged as shown:

Rates

Current Commercial Rates $’000

Revised Commercial Rates $’000

General rate

42,313

42,888

Tourism/economic development

575

0

Combined General and Tourism Rates

42,888

42,888

 

35        The general rate factors would be as follows:

Category

Factor

Residential

1.00

Lifestyle

0.95

Commercial

2.50

Farmland

0.80

Residential Heritage B & B

1.75

 

Advantages

·        One less targeted rate to administer, with no change to commercial ratepayers.

Disadvantages

·        There are no identified disadvantages.

Option Three – Alternative scenarios

36        Under this option, the Council would request alternative scenarios for the general rate differential to be reported back to the 10 year plan Council meeting in January 2024.  Alternative scenarios could include different levels of the general rate factors.

37        The Council would be provided with examples of the ratepayer impact on a selection of property values within each property category. Advantages and disadvantages would also be provided.

NEXT STEPS

38        A Rating Method Report will be presented to the Council at its 10 year plan Council meeting in January 2024, which will incorporate the decision made by Council. 

39        The proposed rating method will be included in the documentation that supports the 10 year plan 2024-34.

 

Signatories

Author:

Sharon Bodeker - Special Projects Manager

Authoriser:

Carolyn Allan - Acting Chief Financial Officer

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

General Rate Factors for Metropolitan and Provincial Councils

158

b

Rates Comparison Chart – Average Residential Rate

159

 


 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

This decision promotes the social and environmental well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

The 10 year plan contributes to objectives and priorities of the strategic framework as it describes the Council’s activities, the community outcomes, and provides a long term focus for decision making and coordination of the Council’s resources, as well as a basis for community accountability.

Māori Impact Statement

The adoption of Te Taki Haruru – Māori Strategic Framework signals Council’s commitment to mana whenua and to its obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi.  Mana whenua and Māori have been involved in pre-engagement and will have an opportunity to engage with the 10 year plan consultation process through a series of planned hui.

Sustainability

The 10 year plan 2024-34 contains content regarding the Council’s approach to sustainability.  Major issues and implications for sustainability are discussed in the Infrastructure Strategy and financial resilience is discussed in the Financial Strategy.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The proposed rating method will be incorporated into the 10 year plan 2024-34 supporting documentation and Consultation Document.

Financial considerations

The financial impacts are discussed in the report.

Significance

There will be full engagement on the 10 year plan 2024-34, which will cover any issues of significance.

Engagement – external

While there has been no external engagement with other territorial authorities, research has been undertaken on current general rate differentials for the NZ metropolitan and provincial councils.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council are involved in the development of the 10 year plan 2024‑34.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Any decision on the rating method may be of interest to Community Boards.

 

 


Council

28 November 2023

 



Council

28 November 2023

 




Council

28 November 2023

 

 

10 Year Plan - Early engagement feedback

Department: Corporate Policy and Communications and Marketing

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.         This report summarises the feedback received by the Dunedin City Council (DCC) through the  early engagement activities undertaken for the 10 Year Plan 2024–34 (the Plan).

2.         The purpose of the early engagement activities was to increase community knowledge of the 10 Year Plan process; provide an opportunity for the community to contribute their views ahead of the development of the Plan; and gather community feedback to inform the formal consultation on the Plan in 2024.

3.         Early engagement activities were undertaken between 5 and 31 October 2023. Activities included a marketing campaign, provision of information, a survey, a comments wall, targeted stakeholder engagement and Councillor led activity.

4.         Early engagement feedback was received through a combination of online activities, targeted stakeholder engagement and via written submissions.

5.         Early engagement is not a statutory requirement, but is an additional opportunity to engage the community in the development of the Plan.

6.         The early engagement focussed on the DCC’s key services and activities, grouped into 6 focused areas.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the feedback received from the community through early engagement on the Dunedin City Council’s 10 Year Plan 2024-34.

b)     Notes that feedback received from the community through early engagement will inform formal consultation on the Dunedin City Council’s 10 Year Plan 2024-34.

 

 

BACKGROUND

7.         At its meeting on 12 September 2023, the Council’s Community Services Committee considered a report that outlined options for early engagement with the community, in the context of the 10 Year Plan 2024-34 development.  At that meeting, the Committee resolved the following:

Moved (Cr David Benson-Pope/Cr Bill Acklin):

That the Committee:

a)     Agrees that the preferred option for early engagement with the community, to support the development of the 2024-2034 10 Year Plan is online and targeted stakeholder meetings early engagement.

b)        Notes that staff will implement the preferred option.

             Motion carried (CSC/2023/018)”

Engagement approach and content

8.         Early engagement activities were conducted through an online survey and comments wall, through targeted stakeholder engagement and Councillor led activities.

9.         Councillor led activity included drive arounds with the Library Book Bus and attending two Saturdays at the Otago Farmers Market.

10.       Key messages for the early engagement included checking in with community, hearing what matters to the community; and asking the community to share their opinion.

11.       An information brochure was printed and distributed to inform the community. It included:

a)         An update on the 10 Year Plan process, including a timeline with milestones in regard to the formal consultation in March/April 2024.

b)        Services and activities delivered by the DCC and how these are funded.

c)         Key projects and/or activities that are currently underway or coming up. Examples included swimming pools, playgrounds, community housing, grants, South Dunedin library and community complex, kerbside collection, landfills and resource recovery.

d)        How to provide feedback to the DCC.

12.       The early engagement activity was promoted through newspaper advertising (paper copy and digital), brochure distribution, the DCC’s external website, and the DCC’s social media channels.

13.       Online early engagement was conducted through a survey (the Survey) and a Comments Wall.

14.       The responses to both the Survey and Comments Wall were structured under six service and activity areas to capture the work undertaken by the DCC:

a)         Roads, Water and Waste Services

b)        Libraries, Arts and Culture

c)         Social and Community Wellbeing

d)        Economic Wellbeing

e)        Pools, Parks, Gardens and Sporting facilities

f)         Environment and Sustainability

Early engagement online survey

15.       The Survey was structured around responses on a scale of five options ranging from ‘do a lot more’ to ‘do a lot less’. There was also sixth option to respond being ‘I don’t know’.

16.       The Survey included open questions for those respondents who wanted an opportunity to provide addtional feedback to the DCC.

17.       The Survey included two questions for respondents about communication channels with the DCC, being how do people find out information about DCC services and activities, and how they would prefer to receive this information.

18.       Feedback received through the Survey is discussed in detail below.

Comments Wall

19.       A Comments Wall was provided using an online engagement platform. Comments could be posted in a free text format, tagged to the six service and activity areas listed in point 14.  Respondents could contribute anonymised comments, and also ‘like’ or ‘dislike’ comments posted by other respondents, using a  commonly understood thumbs up and thumbs down system.

20.       While the Comments Wall is now closed, the early engagement responses posted there are still available to view.

21.       A breakdown of the service and activities areas where feedback was received on the Comments Wall is included in the discussion below.

Targeted stakeholder engagement

22.       Targeted engagement was undertaken as part of the early engagement process. This included a fono with representatives of Dunedin’s Pasifika community, a series of hui with members of the Māori community, and meeting with the Dunedin Youth Council.

23.       The Pacific Otago Trust subsequently provided a written response to the early engagement, which is included with other written responses in Attachment A.

24.       Feedback received from Māori residents and organisations is attached to this report as Attachment B.

Written feedback

25.       Four written responses were received to the early engagement activity from Pacific Trust Otago, Te Whatu Ora, Orokonui Ecosanctuary; and Sports Otago. These are attached to this report as Attachment A.

DISCUSSION

Feedback received through the early engagement online survey

26.       A total of 859 responses were received through the Survey.

27.       Comments provided by Survey respondents are attached to this report as Attachment C.

28.       Overall, Survey respondents wanted the same level of service from the DCC and ‘a little bit more’, with the exception of Environment and Sustainability, where a majority of responses were to ‘do a lot more’ and ‘do a little  bit more’.

Comments wall

29.       The comments wall received 400 comments. These comments are attached to this report as Attachment D. The number of posts for each DCC service and activity area are detailed in the table below. It should be noted that around 70 comments on the Comment Wall were of a similar nature and were received from the same email address over a single 45 minute time period.

Category

Total

Roads, Water and Waste Services

114

Pools, Parks, Gardens and Sporting Facilities

98

Social and Community Wellbeing

70

Environment and Sustainability

57

Economic Wellbeing

38

Libraries, Arts and Culture

23

Themes in the early engagement feedback

30.       The area of Road, Water and Waste Services three main areas of feedback were: infrastructure maintenance and improvements, waste reduction (recycling and composting) and footpaths and cycleways.

31.       Environment and Sustainability comments raised topics such as alternative modes of transport (cycleways, buses, trains); waste reduction (more and improved recycling, green recycling, incentives for businesses); and restoring biodiversity (planting natives, restoring forests and wetlands, support for the Wildlife Hospital.

29        Climate change was mentioned as a critical issue that needed more attention and action.

30.       Survey respondents were satisfied with the DCC’s Libraries, Arts and Culture facilities, noting that funding levels should maintained or increased. There was interest in the South Dunedin Library development.

31.       Survey respondents commented on live music in Dunedin citing support and promotion for performances, and the need for a mid-size venue as areas to be considered in the Plan.

32.       Comments in the survey indicate that Arts and Culture is seen as an essential feature of Dunedin.

33.       Within the Social and Community Wellbeing area, respondents commented that there was a need for additional community housing, and identified that homelessness was a significant and increasing issue in Dunedin.

34.       Respondents were satisfied with community events, such as festivals, and expressed support for more of these events to take place. They also identified issues around community hall maintenance and upgrades.

35.       Comments were supportive of community grants, noting that these could be made more easily accessible.

36.       Respondents commented on the importance of community wellbeing and expressed a need to focus on the less fortunate members of the community.

37.       Comments focused on economic development, with support for local small-scale businesses and initiatives and measures to attract and retain businesses in Dunedin. Skill-building was also a theme in the comments, including support towards education and training, and pathways in the Dunedin job market for students.

38.       Feedback on Pools, Parks, Gardens, and Sporting facilities focused on these topics: the upgrade of existing parks and gardens amenities; a new destination playground; table tennis and gymnastics infrastructure; bike trails; aquatics facilities upgrade; and a physiotherapy pool.

39        There were 414 responses to the question ‘What else do you want us to know?’ The three main themes from these responses were: a sustainable and resilient city (resilience to climate change, wildlife and environment protection); transport (alternative modes of transport – buses, cycleways, trains; parking in the CDB), and concerns about rates and fees increases.

40.       On the final two questions regarding information delivery on the Council services and activities, the main sources of information were: the DCC website; newspapers such as the Otago Daily Times and The Star; the DCC Facebook page; and Libraries.

41.       The respondents preference for being informed about DCC matters was through the DCC website, the DCC Facebook page,  email direct to their inbox and newspapers.

OPTIONS

42.       As this is a report for noting, there are no options requiring Council’s consideration.

NEXT STEPS

43.       Early engagement feedback will inform planning for the formal 10 Year Plan consultation, which is expected to commence in mid-March 2024.

 

Signatories

Author:

Jasmin Lamorie - Senior Corporate Planner

Leanne Mash - Communications and City Marketing Manager

Authoriser:

Jeanette Wikaira - General Manager Community Services (Acting)

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Written feedback from stakeholders

169

b

Māori Early Engagement Feedback

181

c

Additional Comments from Survey Responses to the Early Engagement

182

d

Responses poseted on the Comments Wall for Early Engagement

277

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report summarises democratic input into local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities. As part of this process an opportunity has been provided for the community to express their view and aspirations, in the context of the 10 Year Plan 2021-2031 development.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Early engagement in the context of the 10 year plan 2021-2031 development is relevant to all strategies in the DCC’s strategic framework, along with Te Taki Haruru and the Zero Carbon Plan.

Māori Impact Statement

The adoption of Te Taki Haruru, the Māori Strategic Framework signals Council’s commitment to mana whenua and to its obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi. Mana whenua and Māori have been involved in pre-engagement and will have an opportunity to engage with the 10 year plan consultation process through a series of planned hui.

Sustainability

Early engagement provided an opportunity for the community to express their views and aspirations relating to DCC’s work towards sustainability and wider climate change ambitions. The area of Environment and Sustainability received the second-highest number of responses in the early engagement.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

Early engagement relates to the 10 Year Plan and related strategies and policies.

Financial considerations

Early engagement activity costs were met within existing budgets.

Significance

Early engagement was not driven by a specific decision/proposal/issue but was delivered in alignment with the principles outlined in the Significance and Engagement policy.

Engagement – external

External engagement was held through online feedback and a series of targeted stakeholder meetings, which were approved by Council. There were 859 responses to the online survey and 400 comments posted on the online comments wall.

Engagement - internal

The early engagement plan was prepared with input from staff, including community engagement practitioners, from across all DCC departments. These include City Development, Corporate Policy, Community Development, Communications and Marketing, Enterprise Dunedin, and Ara Toi.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

COVID-19 was identified as a potential risk that could have impacted face to face activities. Plans were in place to ensure any disruptions to planned stakeholder meetings were managed in alignment with central government guidance.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards were provided with early engagement information and directed to the online survey.

 

 


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Financial Result - Period Ended 30 September 2023

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report provides the financial results for the period ended 30 September 2023 and the financial position as at that date.

2          As this is an administrative report only, there are no options or Summary of Considerations.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Committee:

a)     Notes the Financial Performance for the period ended 30 September 2023 and the Financial Position as at that date.

 

BACKGROUND

3          This report provides the financial statements for the period ended 30 September 2023.  It includes reports on financial performance, financial position, cashflows and capital expenditure.  The operating result is also shown by group, including analysis by revenue and expenditure type.

DISCUSSION

4          Revenue was $91.690 million for the year or $1.721 million greater than budget.

5          External revenue was unfavourable $1.193 million to budget due to lower than expected revenue from water sales, parking, and Building Services activity.  These unfavourable variances were partially offset by increased revenue in Transport, landfill activity and Parks.

6          Grants revenue was favourable $2.597 million due to $3.635 million of additional roading funding reflecting a higher level of maintenance and capital delivery. This favourable variance was partially offset by $677k reform funding and $532k Events funding relating to hosting the recent FIFA World Cup event which was received in June 2023.

7          Expenditure was $113.525 million for the year or $1.932 million greater than budget.  Operational expenditure was greater than expected due to additional roading and three waters maintenance expenditure and unbudgeted costs to update the Bird Management Plan at the Green Island landfill.

8          These unfavourable variances were partially offset by savings in interest and personnel costs.

9          The volatility of world markets continues to impact the performance of the Waipori Fund.  For the three months to September, Australian and NZ equities have reduced in fair value, with international equities also recording decreases in values.

10        Capital expenditure was $49.292 million or 105% of budget.  Expenditure on the retail Quarter Upgrade was ahead of budget reflecting the project being ahead of the original programme for both the central carriageway and enabling works. This expenditure is offset by an underspend in Parks and Recreation reflecting delays in the Moana Pool upgrade project and the associated hydroslide replacement.

NEXT STEPS

11        Financial Result Reports continue be presented to future meetings of either the Finance and Council Controlled Organisation Committee or Council.

 

 

Signatories

Authoriser:

Sandy Graham - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Summary Financial Information

327

b

Statement of Financial Performance

328

c

Statement of Financial Position

329

d

Statement of Cashflow

330

e

Capital Expenditure Summary by Activity

331

f

Detailed Capital Expenditure Programme

332

g

Summary of Operating Variances

336

h

Financial Review

337

 

 


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