Notice of Meeting:

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Dunedin City Council will be held on:

 

Date:                                                    Tuesday 25 June 2019

Time:                                                   1.00 pm

Venue:                                                Council Chamber, Municipal Chambers, The Octagon, Dunedin

 

Sue Bidrose

Chief Executive Officer

 

Council

PUBLIC AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Dave Cull

 

Deputy Mayor

Cr Chris Staynes

 

 

Members

Cr David Benson-Pope

Cr Rachel Elder

 

Cr Christine Garey

Cr Doug Hall

 

Cr Aaron Hawkins

Cr Marie Laufiso

 

Cr Mike Lord

Cr Damian Newell

 

Cr Jim O'Malley

Cr Conrad Stedman

 

Cr Lee Vandervis

Cr Andrew Whiley

 

Cr Kate Wilson

 

 

Senior Officer                                               Sue Bidrose, Chief Executive Officer

 

Governance Support Officer                  Lynne Adamson

 

 

 

Lynne Adamson

Governance Support Officer

 

 

Telephone: 03 477 4000

Lynne.Adamson@dcc.govt.nz

www.dunedin.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Reports and recommendations contained in this agenda are not to be considered as Council policy until adopted.

 


Council

25 June 2019

 

 

ITEM TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                                                                         PAGE

 

1             Opening                                                                                                                                                                       4

2             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                              4

2.1       Public Forum - Resource Management Act                                                                                       4

2.2       Public Forum - Climate Emergency                                                                                                       4

2.3       Public Forum - Climate Emergency/Crisis                                                                                          4

3             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                    4

4             Confirmation of Agenda                                                                                                                                        4

5             Declaration of Interest                                                                                                                                           5

6             Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                                                    17

6.1       Ordinary Council meeting - 30 April 2019                                                                                        17

6.2       Ordinary Council meeting - 28 May 2019                                                                                        18

6.3       Ordinary Council Annual Plan Deliberations meeting - 27 May 2019                                    19  

Minutes of Committees

7             Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee - 21 May 2019                                      20

8             Economic Development Committee - 21 May 2019                                                                                 21

9             Community and Culture Committee - 11 June 2019                                                                                22

Minutes of Community Boards

10           Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 13 March 2019                                                                             23

11           Otago Peninsula Community Board - 2 May 2019                                                                                     24

Reports

12           Adoption of the Annual Plan 2019/20                                                                                                           25

13           Setting of Rates for the 2019/20 Financial Year                                                                                         28

14           DCC submission on the review of the NZ Walking Access Act 2008                                                   52

15           Submission on Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill                                                                     62

16           Proposed parking changes - June 2019                                                                                                         68

17           Declaring a climate emergency                                                                                                                        96

18           LGNZ Annual General Meeting Remits and Rules                                                                                   117

19           Waipori Fund Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives - Review                                        132

20           2019/2020 Statements of Intent -
Dunedin City Holdings Group Companies                                                                                                  151

Notice of Motion

21           Notice of Motion - Kiwi Rail                                                                                                                             155              

Resolution to Exclude the Public                                                                                                                     157

 

 


Council

25 June 2019

 

1     Opening

Rev Brendon McRae, Minister – Flagstaff Presbyterian Community Church will open the meeting with a prayer.

2     Public Forum

2.1       Public Forum - Resource Management Act

Diane Yeldon wishes to address Council on the Resource Management Act.  Ms Yeldon has provided written documentation which is in the separately circulated papers.

2.2       Public Forum - Climate Emergency

Jennifer Shulzitski wishes to address the Council on the Climate Emergency on behalf of Extinction Rebellion Ōtepoti Dunedin.

 

2.3       Public Forum - Climate Emergency/Crisis

Sue Novell wishes to address the Council on the Climate Emergency/Crisis on behalf of the Seniors’ Action Network Group (SCAN).

3     Apologies

An apology has been received from Cr Chris Staynes.

 

That the Council:

 

Accepts the apology from Cr Chris Staynes.

4     Confirmation of agenda

Note: Any additions must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.


Council

25 June 2019

 

Declaration of Interest

 

  

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.         Members are reminded of the need to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as an elected representative or staff member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

2.         Elected members are reminded to update their register of interests as soon as practicable, including amending the register at this meeting if necessary.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes/Amends if necessary the Elected Members' Interest Register attached as Attachment A; and

b)     Confirms/Amends the proposed management plan for Elected Members' Interests.

c)     Notes the Executive Leadership Interest Register attached as Attachment B.

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Councillor Register of Interest

2

b

ELT Register of Interest

2

  



Council

25 June 2019

 

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Council

25 June 2019

 

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Council

25 June 2019

 

Confirmation of Minutes

Ordinary Council meeting - 30 April 2019

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 30 April 2019 as a correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Ordinary Council meeting  held on 30 April 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

 


Council

25 June 2019

 

Ordinary Council meeting - 28 May 2019

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

Confirms the public part of the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held on 28 May 2019 as a correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Ordinary Council meeting  held on 28 May 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

 


Council

25 June 2019

 

Ordinary Council Annual Plan Deliberations meeting - 27 May 2019

 

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

Confirms the minutes of the Ordinary Council Annual Plan Deliberations meeting held on 29, 30 and 31 May 2019 as a correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Ordinary Council Annual Plan Deliberations meeting  held on 29, 30 and 31 May 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

  


Council

25 June 2019

 

Minutes of Committees

Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee - 21 May 2019

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee meeting held on 21 May 2019

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Finance and Council Controlled Organisations Committee held on 21 May 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

25 June 2019

 

Economic Development Committee - 21 May 2019

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Economic Development Committee meeting held on 21 May 2019

b)     Takes Part C items of the minutes of the Economic Development Committee held on Tuesday, 21 May 2019, in the non-public part of the meeting.

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Economic Development Committee held on 21 May 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

25 June 2019

 

Community and Culture Committee - 11 June 2019

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Community and Culture Committee meeting held on 11 June 2019   

 

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Community and Culture Committee held on 11 June 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

   


Council

25 June 2019

 

Minutes of Community Boards

Waikouaiti Coast Community Board - 13 March 2019

 

 

gg

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Waikouaiti Coast Community Board meeting held on 13 March 2019

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Waikouaiti Coast Community Board held on 13 March 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

  


Council

25 June 2019

 

Otago Peninsula Community Board - 2 May 2019

 

 

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RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Notes the minutes of the Otago Peninsula Community Board meeting held on 2 May 2019

 

 

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Minutes of Otago Peninsula Community Board held on 2 May 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

   


Council

25 June 2019

 

Reports

 

Adoption of the Annual Plan 2019/20

Department: Corporate Policy and Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report recommends the adoption of the Annual Plan 2019/20 and seeks authorisation for the Chief Executive to drawdown debt up to a maximum of $270 million.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Adopts the Annual Plan 2019/20.

b)     Authorises the Chief Executive to make any minor editorial changes resulting from quality checks prior to the final printing of the Annual Plan 2019/20 document.

c)     Authorises the Chief Executive to drawdown debt up to total debt of $270 million in the 2019/20 year.

 

BACKGROUND

2          The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requires all local authorities to prepare and adopt an Annual Plan for each financial year. The purpose of an annual plan is to provide the budget and funding impact statement for the year concerned and to identify any variation from the financial statements and funding impact statement included in the 10 year plan 2018-28 for that year. 

3          The Annual Plan 2019/20 must be adopted before 1 July 2019.

4          Feedback from the community on the draft 2019/20 budgets was sought from 18 March 2019 to 15 April 2019. The Council met in May 2019 to hear submissions, deliberate and make final decisions regarding submissions and community feedback on the draft 2019/20 budgets.

DISCUSSION

5          The final Annual Plan 2019/20 document has been developed based on the supporting documents utilised during the engagement process and the budget updates reported to the Council deliberations meeting. 

6          The substantive changes are:

a)         The document reflects the resolutions made by the Council during deliberations and decision making in May 2019;

b)        The financial statements reflect the 2017/18 Annual Report and a forecast year end position at 30 June 2019; and

c)         The operating budget reflects updated grants and subsidies revenue from New Zealand Transport Agency based on the revised capital expenditure programme. It also reflects re-categorisation of some expenditure lines and transfers between departments with no overall budget impact.

7          The adopted version of the Annual Plan 2019/20 will require a full editorial quality check. This check will be completed within the statutory timeframes. Any required editorial changes can be achieved through delegating authority to approve editorial changes to the Chief Executive.

8          The Council can now complete the final step in the planning process and adopt the Annual Plan 2019/20 prior to the commencement of the new financial year on 1 July 2019.

9          Debt is forecast to increase to $268.473 million in the 2019/20 year. Authority is sought to provide the Chief Executive with the appropriate delegation to drawdown debt up to a maximum of $270 million.

OPTIONS

10        The Council is legislatively required to adopt the Annual Plan 2019/20 by 30 June 2019, therefore there are no options applicable to this report.

NEXT STEPS

11        Once adopted the Annual Plan 2019/20 will be subject to final quality checks, graphic designed and printed for public distribution in hard copy and on the Council’s website. An electronic copy of the Annual Plan 2019/20 will be available on the DCC website from 1 July 2019, and hard copies will be available from mid-July 2019.

12        Information on the Annual Plan and the outcome of Council decision making will be included in FYI and the Star in mid-July 2019.  Organisations which requested funding through the Annual Plan process will be notified of the Council decision of their funding request.

 

Signatories

Author:

Tami Sargeant - Senior Policy Analyst

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Financial Controller

Sandy Graham - General Manager City Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Annual Plan 2019/20 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

The development of the Annual Plan 2019/20 enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities; and promotes the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The Annual Plan contributes to the strategic framework because it provides the necessary funding to implement the services activities outlined in the 2019/20 budget.

Māori Impact Statement

The Annual Plan provides a mechanism for Māori to contribute to decision making.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

10 year plan /Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

This report concludes the development of the Annual Plan.

Financial considerations

The financial considerations are detailed in the report.

Significance

The budget updates are not considered material or significant compared to the 2019/20 year forecast in the 10 year plan 2018-28.

Engagement – external

Community engagement on the draft 2019/20 budgets was undertaken and have informed the Annual Plan.

Engagement - internal

Staff and managers from across the Council have been involved in the development of the Annual Plan.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

As noted in this report, the Council is legislatively required to adopt the Annual Plan by 30 June 2019.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards were involved in the development of the Annual Plan.

 

 


Council

25 June 2019

 

 

Setting of Rates for the 2019/20 Financial Year

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          Following the adoption of the 2019/20 Annual Plan, the Council now needs to set the rates as provided for in the Funding Impact Statement for the 2019/20 year.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Sets the following rates under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 on rating units in the district for the financial year commencing 1 July 2019 and ending on 30 June 2020.

1          General Rate

A general rate set under section 13 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 made on every rating unit, assessed on a differential basis as described below:

·        A rate of 0.3335 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "residential" category.

·        A rate of 0.3169 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "lifestyle" category.

·        A rate of 0.8182 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial" category.

·        A rate of 0.5830 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "residential heritage bed and breakfasts" category.

·        A rate of 0.2671 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "farmland" category.

·        A rate of 0.0611 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the “stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity” category.

2          Community Services Rate

A targeted rate for community services, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        $240.50 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories.

·        $240.50 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial and stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity" categories.

3          Kerbside Recycling Rate

A targeted rate for kerbside recycling, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        $66.30 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories.

·        $66.30 (including GST) per rating unit for rating units in the "commercial" category.

4          Drainage Rates

A targeted rate for drainage, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        $559.00 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·        $279.50 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" categories and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·        $559.00 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial, residential institutions, schools and stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity" categories and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·        $279.50 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "commercial, residential institutions and schools" categories and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·        $102.25 (including GST) per rating unit for all rating units in the "church" category and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

Rating units which are not "connected" to the scheme and which are not "serviceable" will not be liable for this rate.  Drainage is a combined targeted rate for sewage disposal and stormwater.  Sewage disposal makes up 83.9% of the drainage rate, and stormwater makes up 16.1%.  Non-rateable land will not be liable for the stormwater component of the drainage targeted rate.  Rates demands for the drainage targeted rate for non-rateable land will therefore be charged at 83.9%.

5          Commercial Drainage Rates – Capital Value

A targeted rate for drainage, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        A rate of 0.2976 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial and residential institution" category and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·        A rate of 0.1488 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial" category and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·        A rate of 0.2232 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "school" category and which are "connected" to the public sewerage system.

·        A rate of 0.1116 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "school" category and which are "serviceable" by the public sewerage system.

·        A rate of 0.0229 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the “stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity” category.

This rate shall not apply to properties in Karitane, Middlemarch, Seacliff, Waikouaiti and Warrington.  This rate shall not apply to churches.  Drainage is a combined targeted rate for sewage disposal and stormwater.  Sewage disposal makes up 83.9% of the drainage rate, and stormwater makes up 16.1%.  Non-rateable land will not be liable for the stormwater component of the drainage targeted rate.  Rates demands for the drainage targeted rate for non-rateable land will therefore be charged at 83.9%.

6          Water Rates

A targeted rate for water supply, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        $404.00 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of any "connected" rating unit which receives an ordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws excepting properties in Karitane, Merton, Rocklands/Pukerangi, Seacliff, Waitati, Warrington, East Taieri, West Taieri and North Taieri.

·        $202.00 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of any "serviceable" rating unit to which connection is available to receive an ordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws excepting properties in Karitane, Merton, Rocklands/Pukerangi, Seacliff, Waitati, Warrington, East Taieri, West Taieri and North Taieri.

·        $404.00 (including GST) per unit of water being one cubic metre (viz.  1,000 litres) per day supplied at a constant rate of flow during a full 24 hour period to any "connected" rating unit situated in Karitane, Merton, Seacliff, Waitati, Warrington, West Taieri, East Taieri or North Taieri.

·        $202.00 (including GST) per separately used or inhabited part of any "serviceable" rating unit situated in Waitati, Warrington, West Taieri, East Taieri or North Taieri.  This rate shall not apply to the availability of water in Merton, Karitane or Seacliff. 

7          Fire Protection Rates

A targeted rate for the provision of a fire protection service, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        A rate of 0.0829 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on all rating units in the "commercial" category.  This rate shall not apply to churches.

·        A rate of 0.0622 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on all rating units in the "residential institutions" category. 

·        A rate of 0.0092 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the “stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity” category.

·        $121.20 (including GST) for each separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit within the "residential, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, lifestyle and farmland" category that is not receiving an ordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws.

8          Water Rates – Quantity of Water

A targeted rate for the quantity of water provided to any rating unit fitted with a water meter, being an extraordinary supply of water within the meaning of the Dunedin City Bylaws, set under section 19 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, according to the following scale of charges (GST inclusive):

 

Annual Meter Rental Charge

20mm nominal diameter

$148.00

25mm nominal diameter

$190.00

30mm nominal diameter

$211.00

40mm nominal diameter

$239.00

50mm nominal diameter

$484.00

80mm nominal diameter

$598.00

100mm nominal diameter

$631.00

150mm nominal diameter

$907.00

300mm nominal diameter

$1,177.00

Hydrant Standpipe

$586.00

Reconnection Fee

$412.48

Special Reading Fee

$56.05

 

Backflow Prevention Charge

Backflow Preventer Test Fee

$102.21

Backflow Programme - incomplete application fee (hourly rate)

$41.04

Rescheduled Backflow Preventer Test Fee

$58.07

 

Water Charge

Merton, Rocklands, Hindon and individual farm supplied Bulk Raw Water Tariff

$0.11 per cubic metre

All other treated water per cubic metre

$1.64 per cubic metre

Disconnection of Water Supply – AWSCI to excavate

$229.70

Disconnection of Water Supply – DCC contractor to excavate

$900.00

Where the supply of a quantity of water is subject to this Quantity of Water Targeted Rate, the rating unit will not be liable for any other targeted rate for the supply of the same water.

9         Allanton Drainage Rate

A targeted rate for the capital contribution towards the Allanton Wastewater Collection System, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, of $411.00 (including GST) per rating unit, to every rating unit paying their contribution towards the scheme as a targeted rate over 20 years.  Liability for the rate is on the basis of the provision of the service to each rating unit.  The Allanton area is shown in the map below:

Allanton_AP map

10        Blanket Bay Drainage Rate

A targeted rate for the capital contribution towards the Blanket Bay Drainage System, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, of $636.00 (including GST) per rating unit, to every rating unit paying their contribution towards the scheme as a targeted rate over 20 years.  Liability for the rate is on the basis of the provision of the service to each rating unit.  The Blanket Bay area is shown in the map below:

Blanket Bay

11        Curles Point Drainage Rate

A targeted rate for the capital contribution towards the Curles Point Drainage System, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, of $749.00 (including GST) per rating unit, to every rating unit paying their contribution towards the scheme as a targeted rate over 20 years.  Liability for the rate is on the basis of the provision of the service to each rating unit.  The Curles Point area is shown in the map below:

Curles Point

12        Tourism/Economic Development Rate

A targeted rate for Tourism/Economic Development, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        0.0142 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on every rating unit in the "commercial" category.

·        0.0013 cents in the dollar (including GST) of capital value on the “stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity” category.

13        Warm Dunedin Targeted Rate Scheme

A targeted rate for the Warm Dunedin Targeted Rate Scheme, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, per rating unit in the Warm Dunedin Targeted Rate Scheme. 

The targeted rate scheme provides a way for homeowners to install insulation and/or clean heating.  The targeted rate covers the cost and an annual interest rate.  The interest rates have been and will be:

Rates commencing 1 July 2013 and 1 July 2014 8%

Rates commencing 1 July 2015 and 1 July 2016 8.3%

Rates commencing 1 July 2017 7.8%

Rates commencing 1 July 2018 7.2%

Rates commencing 1 July 2019 6.8%

14        Private Street Lighting Rate

A targeted rate for the purpose of recovering the cost of private street lights, set under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, assessed on a differential basis as follows:

·        $149.40 (including GST) per private street light divided by the number of separately used or inhabited parts of a rating unit for all rating units in the "residential and lifestyle" categories in the private streets as identified in the schedule below.

·        $149.40 (including GST) per private street light divided by the number of rating units for all rating units in the "commercial" category in the private streets as identified in the schedule below. 

1-10

Achilles Avenue

9

Glengarry Court

1

Alton Avenue

10

Glengarry Court

2

Alton Avenue

11

Glengarry Court

2A

Alton Avenue

12

Glengarry Court

3

Alton Avenue

13

Glengarry Court

4

Alton Avenue

14

Glengarry Court

5

Alton Avenue

15

Glengarry Court

6

Alton Avenue

16

Glengarry Court

7

Alton Avenue

17

Glengarry Court

8

Alton Avenue

18

Glengarry Court

9

Alton Avenue

19

Glengarry Court

7

Angle Avenue

20

Glengarry Court

9

Angle Avenue

21

Glengarry Court

11

Angle Avenue

22

Glengarry Court

20

Angle Avenue

23

Glengarry Court

22

Angle Avenue

24

Glengarry Court

24

Angle Avenue

48

Glenross Street

43

Arawa Street

50

Glenross Street

47

Arawa Street

54

Glenross Street

17

Awa Toru Drive

56

Glenross Street

19

Awa Toru Drive

58

Glenross Street

21

Awa Toru Drive

60

Glenross Street

23

Awa Toru Drive

110

Glenross Street

25

Awa Toru Drive

114

Glenross Street

27

Awa Toru Drive

116

Glenross Street

29

Awa Toru Drive

230

Gordon Road

31

Awa Toru Drive

229

Gordon Road

33

Awa Toru Drive

34

Grandview Crescent

35

Awa Toru Drive

10

Halsey Street

37

Awa Toru Drive

1

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

39

Awa Toru Drive

2

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

41

Awa Toru Drive

3

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

43

Awa Toru Drive

4

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

45

Awa Toru Drive

5

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

47

Awa Toru Drive

6

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

49

Awa Toru Drive

7

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

60A

Balmacewen Road

8

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

60B

Balmacewen Road

9

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

62

Balmacewen Road

10

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

64

Balmacewen Road

11

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

1

Balmoral Avenue

12

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

2

Balmoral Avenue

14

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

3

Balmoral Avenue

15

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

4

Balmoral Avenue

16

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

5

Balmoral Avenue

17

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

6

Balmoral Avenue

18

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

7

Balmoral Avenue

19

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

8

Balmoral Avenue

20

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

9

Balmoral Avenue

21

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

10

Balmoral Avenue

22

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

11

Balmoral Avenue

23

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

12

Balmoral Avenue

24

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

16

Balmoral Avenue

25

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

17

Balmoral Avenue

26

Hampton Grove, Mosgiel

19

Barclay Street

4

Harold Street

211

Bay View Road

12

Harold Street

211A

Bay View Road

70a

Hazel Avenue

211B

Bay View Road

70

Hazel Avenue

1

Beaufort Street

72

Hazel Avenue

3

Beaufort Street

215a

Helensburgh Road

119

Belford Street

217a

Helensburgh Road

12

Bell Crescent

217b

Helensburgh Road

14

Bell Crescent

219

Helensburgh Road

24

Bell Crescent

219a

Helensburgh Road

26

Bell Crescent

219b

Helensburgh Road

7

Bishop Verdon Close

221

Helensburgh Road

9

Bishop Verdon Close

223

Helensburgh Road

10

Bishop Verdon Close

49

Highcliff Road

11

Bishop Verdon Close

49A

Highcliff Road

12

Bishop Verdon Close

51

Highcliff Road

8

Bonnington Street

57

Highcliff Road

8a

Bonnington Street

295

Highcliff Road

10

Bonnington Street

297

Highcliff Road

20K

Brighton Road

313

Highcliff Road

20J

Brighton Road

315a

Highcliff Road

20H

Brighton Road

315b

Highcliff Road

20G

Brighton Road

317

Highcliff Road

20F

Brighton Road

16

Highgate

20E

Brighton Road

18

Highgate

20D

Brighton Road

20

Highgate

20C

Brighton Road

34a

Highgate

20B

Brighton Road

34

Highgate

20A

Brighton Road

216

Highgate

20

Brighton Road

218

Highgate

34

Burgess Street

144A

Highgate

36

Burgess Street

144B

Highgate

38

Burgess Street

146

Highgate

40

Burgess Street

146A

Highgate

42

Burgess Street

148

Highgate

44

Burgess Street

11

Irmo Street

46

Burgess Street

12

Irmo Street

48

Burgess Street

9

Kilgour Street

50

Burgess Street

11

Kilgour Street

181

Burt Street

15

Kilgour Street

183

Burt Street

20

Kinvig Street

185

Burt Street

22

Kinvig Street

7

Bush Road, Mosgiel

2

Koremata Street

80

Caldwell Street

4

Koremata Street

82

Caldwell Street

12

Koremata Street

1

Campbell Lane

3

Lawson Street

4

Campbell Lane

4

Leithton Close

5

Campbell Lane

6

Leithton Close

6

Campbell Lane

9

Leithton Close

7

Campbell Lane

10

Leithton Close

8

Campbell Lane

11

Leithton Close

9

Campbell Lane

14

Leithton Close

10

Campbell Lane

15

Leithton Close

11

Campbell Lane

18

Leithton Close

12

Campbell Lane

19

Leithton Close

13

Campbell Lane

21

Leithton Close

14

Campbell Lane

22

Leithton Close

15

Campbell Lane

23

Leithton Close

30

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

26

Leithton Close

32

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

27

Leithton Close

34

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

28

Leithton Close

36

Cardigan Street, North East Valley

29

Leithton Close

22

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

32

Leithton Close

24

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

33

Leithton Close

26

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

36

Leithton Close

28

Centennial Avenue, Fairfield

5

Leven Street

150

Chapman Street

2

Leyton Terrace

150A

Chapman Street

21-67

Lock Street

152

Chapman Street

23a

London Street

12

Clearwater Street

25

London Street

14

Clearwater Street

1-25

London Street

16

Clearwater Street

2-25

London Street

18

Clearwater Street

3-25

London Street

20

Clearwater Street

8

Lynwood Avenue

22

Clearwater Street

10

Lynwood Avenue

24

Clearwater Street

12c

Lynwood Avenue

26

Clearwater Street

12b

Lynwood Avenue

28

Clearwater Street

12a

Lynwood Avenue

30

Clearwater Street

12

Lynwood Avenue

32

Clearwater Street

14

Lynwood Avenue

34

Clearwater Street

3

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

36

Clearwater Street

5

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

22

Cole Street

7

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

11

Corstorphine Road

9

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

11A

Corstorphine Road

11

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

13

Corstorphine Road

13

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

15

Corstorphine Road

15

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

17

Corstorphine Road

17

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

21

Corstorphine Road

19

McAllister Lane, Mosgiel

23

Corstorphine Road

210

Main South Road, Green Island

25

Corstorphine Road

1

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

11

Craighall Crescent

2

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

15

Craighall Crescent

3

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

1

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

4

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

2

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

5

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

4

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

6

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

6

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

7

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

8

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

8

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

10

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

9

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

12

Dalkeith Road, Port Chalmers

10

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

21

Davies Street

11

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

22

Davies Street

12

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

1

Devon Place

13

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

2

Devon Place

14

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

3

Devon Place

15

Mallard Place, Mosgiel

4

Devon Place

11

Malvern Street

5

Devon Place

15

Malvern Street

6

Devon Place

17a

Malvern Street

7

Devon Place

30

Marne Street

9

Devon Place

32

Marne Street

10

Devon Place

42

Marne Street

11

Devon Place

44

Marne Street

12

Devon Place

46

Marne Street

13

Devon Place

48

Marne Street

14

Devon Place

50

Marne Street

15

Devon Place

2

Meldrum Street

16

Devon Place

10

Meldrum Street

17

Devon Place

33

Melville Street

18

Devon Place

14

Middleton Road

19

Devon Place

16

Middleton Road

20

Devon Place

18

Middleton Road

139b

Doon Street

20

Middleton Road

139a

Doon Street

22

Middleton Road

139

Doon Street

24

Middleton Road

141

Doon Street

26

Middleton Road

143

Doon Street

28

Middleton Road

145

Doon Street

30

Middleton Road

149

Doon Street

37

Middleton Road

151

Doon Street

37a

Middleton Road

5

Dorset Street

39

Middleton Road

7

Dorset Street

43

Middleton Road

10

Dorset Street

47a

Middleton Road

11

Dorset Street

19

Montague Street

12

Dorset Street

21

Montague Street

14

Dorset Street

23

Montague Street

16

Dorset Street

29

Moray Place

18

Dorset Street

415

Moray Place

20

Dorset Street

72

Newington Avenue

21

Dorset Street

37

Norwood Street

17

Duckworth Street

41

Norwood Street

19

Duckworth Street

39

Pacific Street

21

Duckworth Street

1

Pembrey Street

35

Duckworth Street

2

Pembrey Street

37

Duckworth Street

3

Pembrey Street

39

Duckworth Street

4

Pembrey Street

39a

Duckworth Street

5

Pembrey Street

41

Duckworth Street

6

Pembrey Street

47

Duckworth Street

7

Pembrey Street

49

Duckworth Street

8

Pembrey Street

53

Duckworth Street

10

Pembrey Street

 

Dunedin Airport

11

Pembrey Street

1–31

Eastbourne Street

264

Pine Hill Road

2–31

Eastbourne Street

264a

Pine Hill Road

3–31

Eastbourne Street

266B

Pine Hill Road

4–31

Eastbourne Street

266A

Pine Hill Road

5–31

Eastbourne Street

268A

Pine Hill Road

6–31

Eastbourne Street

268B

Pine Hill Road

7–31

Eastbourne Street

270

Pine Hill Road

8–31

Eastbourne Street

272

Pine Hill Road

9–31

Eastbourne Street

274

Pine Hill Road

10–31

Eastbourne Street

278A

Pine Hill Road

11–31

Eastbourne Street

278B

Pine Hill Road

12–31

Eastbourne Street

390

Pine Hill Road

13–31

Eastbourne Street

409

Pine Hill Road

14–31

Eastbourne Street

411

Pine Hill Road

15–31

Eastbourne Street

5

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

16–31

Eastbourne Street

6

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

17–31

Eastbourne Street

8

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

18–31

Eastbourne Street

9

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

19–31

Eastbourne Street

10

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

20–31

Eastbourne Street

11

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

21–31

Eastbourne Street

12

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

22–31

Eastbourne Street

13

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

23–31

Eastbourne Street

14

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

24–31

Eastbourne Street

15

Pinfold Place, Mosgiel

25–31

Eastbourne Street

19

Queen Street

26–31

Eastbourne Street

19A

Queen Street

27–31

Eastbourne Street

223

Ravensbourne Road

28–31

Eastbourne Street

87

Riselaw Road

29–31

Eastbourne Street

89

Riselaw Road

30–31

Eastbourne Street

89a

Riselaw Road

31–31

Eastbourne Street

91

Riselaw Road

32–31

Eastbourne Street

91a

Riselaw Road

33–31

Eastbourne Street

93

Riselaw Road

34–31

Eastbourne Street

93a

Riselaw Road

35–31

Eastbourne Street

21

Rosebery Street

36–31

Eastbourne Street

16

Selkirk Street

37–31

Eastbourne Street

11

Shand Street, Green Island

38–31

Eastbourne Street

14

Sheen Street

39–31

Eastbourne Street

6

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

40–31

Eastbourne Street

8

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

41–31

Eastbourne Street

10

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

42–31

Eastbourne Street

12

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

43–31

Eastbourne Street

14

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

46–31

Eastbourne Street

16

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

47–31

Eastbourne Street

20

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

50–31

Eastbourne Street

22

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

51–31

Eastbourne Street

24

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

8

Echovale Avenue

26

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

10

Echovale Avenue

28

Silver Springs Boulevard, Mosgiel

12

Echovale Avenue

1-27

St Albans Street

2

Elbe Street

2-27

St Albans Street

202

Elgin Road

3-27

St Albans Street

204

Elgin Road

4-27

St Albans Street

206

Elgin Road

5-27

St Albans Street

208

Elgin Road

6-27

St Albans Street

1

Eton Drive

7-27

St Albans Street

4

Eton Drive

8-27

St Albans Street

5

Eton Drive

9-27

St Albans Street

6

Eton Drive

10-27

St Albans Street

7

Eton Drive

11-27

St Albans Street

8

Eton Drive

12-27

St Albans Street

9

Eton Drive

13-27

St Albans Street

10

Eton Drive

4

Stanley Square

11

Eton Drive

5

Stanley Square

12

Eton Drive

6

Stanley Square

13

Eton Drive

7

Stanley Square

14

Eton Drive

8

Stanley Square

15

Eton Drive

9

Stanley Square

16

Eton Drive

10

Stanley Square

17

Eton Drive

11

Stanley Square

18

Eton Drive

12

Stanley Square

19

Eton Drive

365

Stuart Street

20

Eton Drive

367

Stuart Street

2

Everton Road

367a

Stuart Street

3

Everton Road

55

Sunbury Street

4

Everton Road

57

Sunbury Street

64

Every Street

59

Sunbury Street

66

Every Street

59a

Sunbury Street

68

Every Street

67

Tahuna Road

70

Every Street

67A

Tahuna Road

76

Every Street

67B

Tahuna Road

7

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69

Tahuna Road

9

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69A

Tahuna Road

11

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69B

Tahuna Road

13

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

69C

Tahuna Road

15

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

1

Taupo Lane

17

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

2

Taupo Street

19

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

1

Thomas Square

21

Fern Road, Ravensbourne

2

Thomas Square

19

Ferntree Drive

3

Thomas Square

21

Ferntree Drive

4

Thomas Square

23

Ferntree Drive

5

Thomas Square

25

Ferntree Drive

6

Thomas Square

45

Forfar Street

7

Thomas Square

47

Forfar Street

8

Thomas Square

47a

Forfar Street

9

Thomas Square

49

Forfar Street

4A

Totara Street, Ravensbourne

51

Forfar Street

44

Turnbull Street

53

Forfar Street

46

Turnbull Street

53a

Forfar Street

85A

Victoria Road

1–80

Formby Street

85B

Victoria Road

5–80

Formby Street

85C

Victoria Road

6–80

Formby Street

85D

Victoria Road

7–80

Formby Street

85G

Victoria Road

8–80

Formby Street

85H

Victoria Road

10–80

Formby Street

85I

Victoria Road

14–80

Formby Street

85J

Victoria Road

15–80

Formby Street

85K

Victoria Road

16–80

Formby Street

85L

Victoria Road

17–80

Formby Street

85M

Victoria Road

18–80

Formby Street

85N

Victoria Road

19–80

Formby Street

85O

Victoria Road

20–80

Formby Street

85P

Victoria Road

239

Fryatt Street

85Q

Victoria Road

248

George Street

85R

Victoria Road

558

George Street

146

Victoria Road

150A

Gladstone Road North

44

Waimea Avenue

150B

Gladstone Road North

46

Waimea Avenue

150C

Gladstone Road North

48

Waimea Avenue

150D

Gladstone Road North

50

Waimea Avenue

150E

Gladstone Road North

58/60

Waimea Avenue

152B

Gladstone Road North

62/64

Waimea Avenue

152C

Gladstone Road North

16

Warwick Street

152D

Gladstone Road North

18

Warwick Street

152E

Gladstone Road North

23

Warwick Street

154A

Gladstone Road North

1

Wenlock Square

214

Gladstone Road North

2

Wenlock Square

216

Gladstone Road North

3

Wenlock Square

218

Gladstone Road North

4

Wenlock Square

220

Gladstone Road North

5

Wenlock Square

222

Gladstone Road North

6

Wenlock Square

224

Gladstone Road North

7

Wenlock Square

226

Gladstone Road North

8

Wenlock Square

228

Gladstone Road North

9

Wenlock Square

230

Gladstone Road North

10

Wenlock Square

232

Gladstone Road North

11

Wenlock Square

234

Gladstone Road North

12

Wenlock Square

39

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

14

Wenlock Square

41

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

15

Wenlock Square

45

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

17

Wenlock Square

47

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

18

Wenlock Square

49

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

19

Wenlock Square

57

Glenbrook Drive, Mosgiel

20

Wenlock Square

1

Glenfinnan Place

21

Wenlock Square

3

Glenfinnan Place

19

Woodside Terrace

4

Glenfinnan Place

20

Woodside Terrace

4A

Glenfinnan Place

22

Woodside Terrace

5

Glenfinnan Place

23

Woodside Terrace

6

Glenfinnan Place

24

Woodside Terrace

7

Glenfinnan Place

25

Woodside Terrace

8A

Glenfinnan Place

25a

Woodside Terrace

8B

Glenfinnan Place

26

Woodside Terrace

9A

Glenfinnan Place

27

Woodside Terrace

9B

Glenfinnan Place

29

Woodside Terrace

10A

Glenfinnan Place

10B

Glenfinnan Place

 

 

1

Glengarry Court

 

 

2

Glengarry Court

 

 

3

Glengarry Court

 

 

4

Glengarry Court

 

 

5

Glengarry Court

 

 

6

Glengarry Court

 

 

7

Glengarry Court

 

 

8

Glengarry Court

 

 

Differential Matters and Categories

b)     Adopts the following differential categories for the 2019/20 financial year.

The differential categories are determined in accordance with the Council's land use codes.  The Council's land use codes are based on the land use codes set under the Rating Valuation Rules 2008 and are set out in Attachment A.  In addition, the Council has established categories for residential institutions, residential heritage bed and breakfasts, the stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity, churches, and schools.

1          Differentials Based on Land Use

The Council uses this matter to:

·        Differentiate the General rate.

·        Differentiate the Community Services rate.

·        Differentiate the Kerbside Recycling rate.

·        Differentiate the Private Street Lighting rate.

·        Differentiate the Tourism/Economic Development rate.

·        Differentiate the Fire Protection rate.

The differential categories based on land use are:

·        Residential – includes all rating units used for residential purposes including single residential, multi-unit residential, multi-use residential, residential special accommodation, residential communal residence dependant on other use, residential bach/cribs, residential carparking and residential vacant land.

·        Lifestyle – includes all rating units with Council's land use codes 2, 20, 21, 22 and 29.

·        Commercial – includes all rating units with land uses not otherwise categorised as Residential, Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts, Lifestyle, Farmland or Stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity.

·        Farmland - includes all rating units used solely or principally for agricultural or horticultural or pastoral purposes.

·        Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts – includes all rating units meeting the following description:

·      Bed and breakfast establishments; and

·      Classified as commercial for rating purposes due to the number of bedrooms (greater than four); and

·      Either:

·     the majority of the establishment is at least 80 years old, or

·     the establishment has Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Registration, or

·     the establishment is a Dunedin City Council Protected Heritage Building as identified in the District Plan; and

·      The bed and breakfast owner lives at the facility.

·        Stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity – this includes land at 130 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin, Assessment 4026695, Valuation reference 27190-01403.

2          Differentials Based on Land Use and Provision or Availability of Service

The Council uses these matters to differentiate the drainage rate and the commercial drainage rate.

The differential categories based on land use are:

·        Residential – includes all rating units used for residential purposes including single residential, multi-unit residential, multi-use residential, residential special accommodation, residential communal residence dependant on other use, residential bach/cribs, residential carparking and residential vacant land.

·        Lifestyle - includes all rating units with Council's land use codes 2, 20, 21, 22 and 29.

·        Farmland - includes all rating units used solely or principally for agricultural or horticultural or pastoral purposes.

·        Commercial – includes all rating units with land uses not otherwise categorised as Residential, Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts, Lifestyle, Farmland, Residential Institutions, Stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity, Churches or Schools.

·        Stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity – this includes land at 130 Anzac Avenue, Dunedin, Assessment 4026695, Valuation reference 27190-01403.

·        Residential Heritage Bed and Breakfasts – includes all rating units meeting the following description:

·      Bed and breakfast establishments; and

·      Classified as commercial for rating purposes due to the number of bedrooms (greater than four); and

·      Either:

·     the majority of the establishment is at least 80 years old or

·     the establishment has Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Registration or

·     the establishment is a Dunedin City Council Protected Heritage Building as identified in the District Plan; and

·      The bed and breakfast owner lives at the facility.

·        Residential Institutions - includes only rating units with the Council's land use codes 95 and 96.

·        Churches – includes all rating units used for places of religious worship.

·        Schools - includes only rating units used for schools that do not operate for profit.

The differential categories based on provision or availability of service are:

·        Connected – any rating unit that is connected to a public sewerage drain.

·        Serviceable – any rating unit that is not connected to a public sewerage drain but is capable of being connected to the sewerage system (being a property situated within 30 metres of a public drain).

3          Differentials Based on Provision or Availability of Service

The Council uses this matter to differentiate the water rates.

The differential categories based on provision or availability of service are:

·        Connected – any rating unit that is supplied by the water supply system.

·        Serviceable – any rating unit that is not supplied but is capable of being supplied by the water supply system (being a rating unit situated within 100 metres of the nearest water supply).

Minimum Rates

c)     Approves that where the total amount of rates payable in respect of any rating unit is less than $5.00 including GST, the rates payable in respect of the rating unit shall be such amount as the Council determines but not exceeding $5.00 including GST.

Low Value Rating Units

d)     Approves that rating units with a capital value of $3,500 or less will only be charged the general rate.

Land Use Codes

e)     Approves that the land use codes attached to this report are adopted as the Council's land use codes for the purpose of the rating method.

Separately Used or Inhabited Part of a Rating Unit

f)     Adopts the following definition of a separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit:

"A separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit includes any portion inhabited or used by the owner/a person other than the owner, and who has the right to use or inhabit that portion by virtue of a tenancy, lease, licence, or other agreement.

This definition includes separately used parts, whether or not actually occupied at any particular time, which are provided by the owner for rental (or other form of occupation) on an occasional or long term basis by someone other than the owner.

For the purpose of this definition, vacant land and vacant premises offered or intended for use or habitation by a person other than the owner and usually used as such are defined as 'used'.

For the avoidance of doubt, a rating unit that has a single use or occupation is treated as having one separately used or inhabited part."

Lump Sum Contributions

g)     Approves that no lump sum contributions will be sought for any targeted rate.

Rating by Instalments

h)     Approves the following schedule of rates to be collected by the Council, payable by four instalments.

The City is divided into four areas based on Valuation Roll Numbers, as set out below:

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 3 continued

Valuation Roll Numbers:

26700

26990

26500

27550

26710

27000

26520

27560

26760

27050

26530

27600

26770

27060

26541

27610

26850

27070

26550

27760

26860

27080

26580

27770

26950

27150

26590

27780

26960

27350

26620

27790

26970

27360

26640

27811

26980

27370

26651

27821

27160

27380

26750

27822

27170

27500

26780

27823

27180

27510

27250

27831

27190

27520

27260

27841

27200

27851

27270

27871

 

27861

27280

27911

 

27880

27450

27921

 

27890

27460

27931

 

27901

27470

27941

 

28000

 

 

 

28010

 

 

 

28020

 

 

Area 4 comprises ratepayers with multiple assessments who pay on a schedule.

Due Dates for Payment of Rates

i)      Approves the due dates for all rates with the exception of water rates, which are charged based on water meter consumption, will be payable in four instalments due on the dates below:

 

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 4

Instalment 1

23/08/19

30/08/19

13/09/19

30/08/19

Instalment 2

15/11/19

29/11/19

13/12/19

29/11/19

Instalment 3

07/02/20

21/02/20

06/03/20

21/02/20

Instalment 4

01/05/20

15/05/20

29/05/20

15/05/20

Water meter invoices are sent separately from other rates at intervals depending on the quantity of water consumed.

Penalties

j)     Resolves to charge the following penalties on unpaid rates:

1          A charge of 10% of the unpaid rates instalment will be added to the amount of any instalment remaining unpaid the day after the instalment due date set out above.

2          Where a ratepayer has not paid the first instalment by the due date of that instalment, and has paid the total rates and charges in respect of the rating unit for the 2019/20 rating year by the due date of the second instalment, the 10% additional charge for the first instalment shall be remitted.

3          For amounts levied in any previous financial year and which remain unpaid on 1 October 2019, 10% of that sum shall be charged, including additional charges (in any).

4          For amounts levied in any previous financial year and which remain unpaid on 1 April 2020, 10% of that sum shall be charged, including additional charges (if any).

Assessing and Recovering Rates

k)     Approves that the Chief Executive Officer, General Manager Finance and Commercial, Financial Controller and Rates and Revenue Team Leader be authorised to take all necessary steps to assess and recover the above rates.

 

BACKGROUND

2          The rating method for the 2019/20 year formed part of the supporting documentation made available during the community engagement period of the draft 2019/20 budget.

DISCUSSION

3          The rating method for the 2019/20 year incorporates the following changes:

·        An increase of $7.00 in the community services targeted rate from $233.50 to $240.50 for the 2019/20 year.

·        The differential rating category previously known as “Forsyth Barr Stadium” has been renamed “Stadium: 10,000+ seat capacity”.

·        The differentiated stadium: 10,000+ capacity rates have been increased for the 2019/20 year by the June 2018 LGCI of 1.8%.

Limit on "Fixed" Charging

4          Section 21 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 includes a limit on certain rates.  In any one year, the Council may not collect more than 30% of its total rates revenue by way of:

·        Any uniform annual general charge.

·        Any targeted rate that is calculated as a fixed amount per rating unit or separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (and which is not used solely for water supply or sewage disposal).

5          The Council does not use a uniform annual general charge.  The relevant targeted rates for the 2019/20 year are the kerbside recycling rate, the community services rate and the drainage fixed charge.  These rates equate to 25% of total rates revenue.

OPTIONS

6          The option provided is to set rates in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 in order to provide rates funding in the 2019/20 year in accordance with the 2019/20 budget.

NEXT STEPS

7          The Council can now set and assess the rates described in its Funding Impact Statement.

 

Signatories

Author:

Carolyn Allan - Senior Management Accountant

Authoriser:

Gavin Logie - Financial Controller

Dave Tombs - General Manager Finance and Commercial

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Dunedin Land Use Codes

2

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities and promotes the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

 

 

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

This decision fits with the strategic framework because it provides the necessary rates funding to implement the activities outlined in the 2019/20 budget.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

10 year plan /Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

The Council has adopted the 2019/20 Annual Plan and can now set and assess the rates described in its Funding Impact Statement.

Financial considerations

The Council has adopted the 2019/20 Annual Plan and can now set and assess the rates described in its Funding Impact Statement.

Significance

The decision sets the rates for the 2019/20 year as outlined in the 2019/20 Annual Plan.

Engagement – external

The proposed rating method formed part of the Supporting Documentation during the community engagement on the 2019/20 draft budget.

Engagement - internal

Internal engagement has occurred with staff in the relevant departments.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

Legal risks were considered and appropriate advice sought.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no known implications for Community Boards.

 

 


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25 June 2019

 

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25 June 2019

 

 

DCC submission on the review of the NZ Walking Access Act 2008

Department: Parks and Recreation

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report seeks approval for the Dunedin City Council (DCC) submission (Attachment A) to the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) on the review of the Walking Access Act 2008 (Act).

2          The submission provides general comments and feedback on questions raised by MPI.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the DCC submission on the review of the Walking Access Act 2008.

 

 

background

1.         The Walking Access Act 2008 says the Act must be reviewed 10 years after its introduction. In May 2019, MPI published a public feedback paper regarding the review of the Walking Access Act 2008.

2.         The review is an opportunity to see how the Act can improve an important part of New Zealand’s system for public access to the outdoors. The review is also an opportunity to consider present state, as well as future challenges. Changes to the Act can reflect on the ways in which persistent and emerging trends are likely to affect walking access in the coming decades.

3.         The consultation deadline is 2 July 2019 at 5.00pm.

DISCUSSION

4.    The review paper highlights six emerging trends since the Act was first introduced:

§ Walking is still the number one activity, but cycling is now the fastest growing mode of transport in several cities and towns across New Zealand. Hunting and fishing are continuing to grow in large numbers.

§ More people now live in urban areas and want to experience nature close to where they are.

§ According to the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment (MBIE), the forecast is for 5.1 million international visitors in 2024, up from 3.7 million international visitors in 2017.

§ There is a growing awareness of the need to protect the environment and make sure use is sustainable.

§ There is growing knowledge about how access to outdoors can improve physical and mental health, social connection, and community wellbeing.

§ Users knowledge is inadequate about how to behave outdoors to avoid negatively impacting flora, fauna and other rural activities e.g. farming.

§    

5.         MPI requires this review to ask the question whether the Act is still necessary and if so, what are the opportunities for improvement. Initial MPI workshops in 2018 identified the following eight themes for potential improvement for feedback:

§ Theme 1 - The purpose, priorities, objective and functions of the Act

§ Theme 2 - Working towards equal access

§ Theme 3 - Coping with visitor numbers

§ Theme 4 - Addressing barriers to landowners providing public access

§ Theme 5 - Encouraging positive visitor behaviours

§ Theme 6 - Organisations working together

§ Theme 7 - Governance for the Act and Commission

§ Theme 8 - Funding

§    

6.         Parks and Recreation has summarised this paper and prepared commentary in response to the eight themes noted above:

a.    The submission is generally supportive of the suggested changes under Theme 1. These include, broadening the scope of the Act to cover topics such as the benefits of outdoors, inclusion of public land and urban areas, and more support for Maori interests. This will enable the Commission to respond to the emerging needs identified.

b.    The submission is also supportive of the objectives and functions of the Commission being more explicit to address the resource constraints in response to requests from the Overseas Investment Office.

c.     The submission questions whether there is a need to focus priorities on first replacing access to areas that have been temporarily closed; suggesting that the focus should first be on understanding whether it is the ‘right product’ and considering whether alignment with New Zealand Treasury Better Business Case Framework might be a more sustainable approach for the community before making any investment decisions.

d.    The submission questions whether the Act should address the lack of equity under Theme 2. The DCC would rather see the Commission encourage a sustainable, balanced network with both dual-use tracks and single-use tracks to ensure that there is enough supply to meet the variety of users - not providing a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to track provision. In support, the submission recommends alignment to Department of Conservation Visitor Profiles for walking tracks referred to in NZ Tracks Standards SNZ HB 8630:2004.

e.    The submission supports Theme 3 that responds to the loss of access resulting from huge increases in visitor numbers, and the opportunity to provide greater guidance for overseas visitors.

f.     The submission supports Theme 4, that responds to barriers from landowners who provide public access. The submission provides suggestions for resolution such as better guidance for landowners (including protecting compliant landowners) compensation, appealing decisions and continuing to act as an ‘honest broker’.

g.    The submission supports Theme 5 that asks whether there is potential to improve access to information about The New Zealand Outdoor Access Code. In response to the questions asked, guidance on ‘typical’ residential complaints and what types of improvements the Commission could make to improve their marketing strategy has been provided. 

h.    The submission generally supports proposals under Theme 6 that focus on improving how organisations can work well together, such as extending controlling authorities to include Trusts and iwi, but also noting that the DCC already has good relationships with ‘other’ parties and uses existing legislative frameworks consistently and appropriately.

i.      Under Theme 6 the submission questions whether there is a need for the Commission to be involved with legal roads and ‘other’ infrastructure given that the DCC is already transparent in its management of legal roads.  A ‘one size fits all’ arrangement may not be as effective, or efficient as a local approach.

j.     The submission provides suggestions under Theme 7 about governance and the role of the gazetted walkway.

k.    The submission also provides suggestions under Theme 7 about the type of matters the Commission may need to consider if they were to start charging a fee for their services.

options

Option One (Recommended Option) – Submit on the on the review of the Walking Access Act 2008

7.            Approve the DCC submission to MPI on the review of the New Zealand Walking Access Act 2008.

Advantages

·    Supports collaboration with central government on management of tracks.

·    Allows DCC to respond to some of the suggested changes and questions asked and provide further information for consideration.

 

Disadvantages

 

·    There are no identified disadvantages for this option.

 

Option Two – Do not submit on the review of the NZ Walking Access Act 2008

8.         Do not approve the DCC submission to MPI on the review of the New Zealand Walking Access Act 2008.

Advantages

·    There are no identified advantages for this option.

 

Disadvantages

·    Missed opportunity to support cross-collaboration on walking access outcomes with central government.

·    Missed opportunity to provide feedback on central government’s proposed changes to the Walking Access Act 2008.

 

NEXT STEPS

9.            If the Council approves the submission it will be sent to MPI for its consideration.

Signatories

Author:

Claire Swift - Senior Planner

Authoriser:

Robert West - Group Manager Parks and Recreation

Sandy Graham - General Manager City Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Submission on the Walking Access Act 2008 Public Feedback Review Paper

2

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

This submission was developed in line with the goals and priorities of the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts on this submission for tangata whenua.

 

Sustainability

There are no known implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no known implications.

 

Financial considerations

There are no known financial implications.

Significance

The decision is of low significance in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Engagement – external

There has been no external engagement for this submission.

Engagement - internal

There are been no internal engagement for this submission.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


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25 June 2019

 

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25 June 2019

 

 

Submission on Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities Bill

Department: Corporate Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report seeks approval of a draft submission (Attachment A) to the Environment Select Committee on the establishment of Kāinga Ora (formerly known as the Housing and Urban Development Authority) through the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves the draft Dunedin City Council submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill.

 

 

BACKGROUND

 

2          The Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill (the Bill) establishes a new Crown entity as the Government's delivery agency for housing and urban development. Kāinga Ora will consolidate three existing agencies: Housing New Zealand, its subsidiary HLC, and parts of the Kiwi Build Unit. 

3          Once established, the ambition is for Kāinga Ora to work across the urban development spectrum to build complete, diverse communities that enable New Zealanders from all backgrounds to have similar opportunities in life. Kāinga Ora will have two key areas of focus:

·    Being the lead developer and driving the delivery of affordable homes and public housing; and,

·    Being a world class public landlord, managing tenancies across New Zealand.

4          The Bill also sets out the operating framework for Kāinga Ora.  The agency’s strategic direction will be provided through a Government policy statement.

5          The Bill does not include detail regarding any future regulatory powers Kāinga Ora may be given.  These are expected to be dealt with through an amendment at a later date that sets out the new Crown entity’s powers.

6          Submissions on the Bill are due 11 July 2019.

DISCUSSION

7          The DCC submission is supportive of the establishment of the new Crown entity.  The submission sets out the challenges faced by Dunedin that the agency might work with the DCC and other stakeholders to address.

8          The submission outlines Dunedin’s housing issues, including the availability of affordable and high-quality housing. The submission also notes the work on responding to the National Policy Statement for Urban Development Capacity to identify actions the DCC can undertake to increase development.

9          The DCC submission also highlights South Dunedin as increasingly vulnerable to climate change and sea level rise, and how these impacts exacerbate existing challenges such as poor housing quality.

OPTIONS

Option One (Recommended Option) – Submit on the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill

10        Approve the DCC submission on the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill, with any suggested amendments, to the Environment Select Committee.

Advantages

·        Enables the DCC to continue the conversation with Government for the new agency to  work with local government as a partner, significant owner of infrastructure, property and land, and provider of community housing.

Disadvantages

·        There are no identified disadvantages for this option.

Option Two – Do not submit on the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill

11        Do not submit a DCC submission on the Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill.

Advantages

·        There are no identified advantages for this option.

Disadvantages

·        Missed opportunity for the DCC to continue the conversation with Government for the new agency to work with local government as a partner, significant owner of infrastructure, property and land, and provider of community housing.

NEXT STEPS

12        If the Council approves the draft submission it will be sent to the Environment Select Committee for consideration by 11 July 2019.

1        Signatories

Author:

Hoani Yates - Policy Advisor

Authoriser:

Nicola Pinfold - Group Manager Community and Planning

John Christie - Director Enterprise Dunedin

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Draft DCC submission: Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill

2

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This proposal enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

The submission has been developed in line with the goals and objectives of the strategic framework.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no known specific impacts for sustainability resulting from a decision to approve the draft DCC submission. 

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no known impacts for current levels of service and/or performance measures resulting from a decision to approve the draft DCC submission.

Financial considerations

There are no financial impacts on the DCC from a decision to approve the draft DCC submission.

Significance

This decision has been assessed under the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy as being of low significance.

Engagement – external

There was no external engagement.

Engagement - internal

Staff from Corporate Policy, Enterprise Dunedin, City Development and Events and Community Development contributed to the development of this submission.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

The DCC submission may be of interest to Community Boards.

 

 


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25 June 2019

 

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25 June 2019

 

 

Proposed parking changes - June 2019

Department: Transport

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          This report attaches the findings of the Bylaws Subcommittee on proposed changes to parking controls.

2          Consultation was carried out in May on some proposed changes to parking controls. On 10 June the Bylaws Subcommittee considered the proposed changes and feedback received and heard a submitter.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)         Considers the recommendations of the Bylaws Subcommittee on proposed changes to parking.

b)        Approves the changes to parking controls that are shown in the Dunedin City Council's traffic and parking controls database, June 2019 update, https://tinyurl.com/ParkingJune2019.

c)         Notes that all parking controls previously approved by Council and not shown as a change on the June 2019 traffic and parking controls database, remain unchanged.

 

BACKGROUND

3          Parking controls contribute to the objectives of the Dunedin Integrated Transport Strategy 2013, particularly by supporting the achievement of a safe, efficient and accessible transport network for all modes. Council is also moving towards consistency and simplicity in the parking control system. This should make parking easier for people to use and understand and be more efficient to enforce. Opportunities for commuters to change the way they travel will be supported by Council as part of new sustainable travel initiatives to be introduced over the next two-year period.

4          Council maintains a GIS map database of traffic and parking controls (the database) which reflects all on-street parking controls that are implemented with markings and/or signs.

5          Parking controls are made under the Traffic and Parking Bylaw. The Bylaws Subcommittee has the delegation to consider changes to parking controls, and to make recommendations to the Council, which can approve traffic and parking controls.

6          Recommended parking changes will be periodically brought before the Bylaws Subcommittee for consideration.

DISCUSSION

7          Recommended changes to parking are shown in the database https://tinyurl.com/ParkingJune2019.

Consultations

8          At the Council meeting on 30 April 2019, two proposed changes to parking controls were approved for public consultation:

·        TPC10 – Changes to paid parking in the Tertiary Precinct. The purpose is to try new approaches to parking management, encourage parking turnover, and better provide for visitors to the University of Otago and Otago Polytechnic.

·        TPC11 - Changes to paid parking in the Jetty Street area to encourage parking turnover, and better provide for visitors and customers to the area. These changes build on parking changes approved in the area in December 2018.

9          Public consultation was open for 15 working days from 1 May to 21 May 2019. Information was delivered to properties in the affected areas. The proposed changes were publicly advertised in the Otago Daily Times on Saturday 4 May 2019, and information was available on the Council website from 1 May 2019.

10        There was a total of 540 submissions. Submissions were received through Council’s submission database, and full text of the submissions is available on Council’s website.

11        The vast majority of submissions related to the Tertiary Precinct proposed changes. Due to the large volume of submissions being received, the hearings for the Tertiary Precinct parking changes have been deferred, to allow Council to properly consider feedback, assess available options, and input into the Tertiary Precinct Safety, Accessibility and Streetscape Upgrade (a joint initiative of the Dunedin City Council, University of Otago and Otago Polytechnic).  The hearing will likely be held in early 2020, after broader consultation is held on the Tertiary Precinct Safety, Accessibility and Streetscape Upgrade.

12        After reviewing the feedback received staff have proposed some changes to TPC 11, Jetty Street area parking. This involves leaving the free unrestricted spaces currently available on the east side of Bond Street as they are, except for formally marking the spaces. This responds to submissions on the use of these spaces by residents and allows staff time to investigate the role of residents parking in this mixed-use area.

13        Summary reports for the proposed parking changes are in Attachments A and B. These include a description of the changes as consulted on, a summary of the feedback, and staff response to the feedback. For the Tertiary Precinct, this is a high-level summary only, as detailed analysis has not yet been undertaken.

14        34 people wanted to speak at the hearings, mostly in relation to the Tertiary Precinct. One submitter spoke at the hearings on the Jetty Street area changes.

Minor changes

15        A number of minor changes to parking controls are also proposed. These are detailed in Attachment C and include:

·    Parking changes to improve safety, efficiency or access, where appropriate engagement has been carried out with affected parties.

·    Parking changes arising from other projects where consultation has been carried out with affected parties, and in some cases are already marked and signed.

·    Changes to remove unused parking including bus stops or residents only parking.

Clarifications

16        Suggested clarifications to the database are detailed in Attachment D. These are changes to markings or signs intended to clarify parking controls which are already in place. Changes may make existing markings or signs clearer, or reinforce existing rules (for example installation of broken yellow lines to clarify that no vehicles may stop within 6 m of an intersection under Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004, or signage to provide notice of citywide controls in the Traffic and Parking Bylaw). The clarifications are considered necessary for access or safety, and are an exception to Council’s general approach not to mark anything that is currently enforceable under existing rules.

Traffic and Parking Bylaw Subcommittee

17        The Traffic and Parking Bylaw Subcommittee considered all feedback and heard submitters in June.

18        See Attachment E for the findings of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw Subcommittee.

19        See Attachment F for the minutes of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw Subcommittee hearings.

OPTIONS

20        Options are set out below for all changes.

Option One – Approve the proposed changes to the traffic and parking controls database

Advantages

·        Improves safety, efficiency and access on the transport network:

i)          Providing appropriate short stay parking to provide for surrounding land uses in various locations.

ii)         Improving safety and enabling property access by prohibiting obstructive parking, making existing parking controls clearer, and providing for access to new driveways.

iii)        Making good use of space – by reallocating redundant parking spaces.

·        Enables visitors and customers to more easily find a park in the Warehouse Precinct.

·        Makes some provision for residents parking in the Warehouse Precinct and surrounds, while enabling investigation into residents parking generally.

·        Enables wider consideration of issues and options for parking in the Tertiary Precinct.

Disadvantages

·        More parking spaces charged for.

·        Some people may need to change their parking and travel routines.

·        Alternatives to private vehicle travel are not attractive for some people.

·        Some people may find it more difficult to park close to their house.

Option Two – Retain the existing traffic and parking controls without amendment

Advantages

·        Council resources can be allocated to other transport projects.

·        People would not need to change their parking and travel routines.

Disadvantages

·        Does not improve safety, efficiency and access on the transport network.

·        Does not enable visitors and customers to more easily find a park in the Warehouse Precinct.

NEXT STEPS

21        If the Council decides to approve the proposed changes to parking controls, the next step will be to implement approved changes through signs and road markings.

Signatories

Author:

Anja McAlevey - Senior Transportation Planner

Authoriser:

Richard Saunders - Group Manager Transport

Simon Drew - General Manager Infrastructure Services

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Jetty Street area proposed parking

2

b

Tertiary Precinct proposed parking

2

c

Minor proposed parking changes

2

d

Proposed clarifications to parking

2

e

Findings of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw Subcommittee

2

f

Minutes of the Traffic and Parking Bylaw Subcommittee - 10 June 2019

2

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This report enables democratic local decision making and action by, and on behalf of communities.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

 

Establishing traffic and parking controls contributes to the vision of the Integrated Transport Strategy that “Dunedin is one of the world’s great small cities, with a safe low-carbon transport system that supports a compact city with resilient centres, inclusive and healthy communities, and national and international connectivity.” Specifically, establishing and changing traffic and parking controls contributes towards this vision by supporting the achievement of a safe, efficient and accessible transport network for all modes.

 

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

There are no implications for sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no implications.

Financial considerations

There are no financial implications, costs for implementing the proposed changes are covered by existing budgets.

Significance

Proposed changes are of low significance. They are generally minor and localised, with little impact on existing levels of service, and low community interest. There is high consistency with Council’s existing policy and strategy, and low impact on Council’s finances, capacity and capability.

Engagement – external

Engagement has been undertaken with property occupiers in the affected areas. Public engagement was invited in the Otago Daily Times and on Council’s website.

Engagement - internal

Transport and parking services staff have been consulted.

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no identified risks.

Conflict of Interest

There are no known conflicts of interest.

Community Boards

Community Boards have not been directly consulted as there are no significant changes within the boundary of the Community Boards.

 

 


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25 June 2019

 

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25 June 2019

 

 

Declaring a climate emergency

Department: Corporate Policy

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The purpose of this report is to provide background, and the advantages and disadvantages, to declaring a climate emergency in Dunedin.

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Considers whether to declare a climate emergency in Dunedin.

 

BACKGROUND

2          During the 28 May 2019 Council Public Forum, it was proposed by Mr Rory McCarthy that Council declare a climate emergency in Dunedin (Attachment A).

3          Approximately 500 councils in Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Switzerland have recently declared a climate emergency. As outlined in the proposal, the declaration of a climate emergency:

·    recognises we are in a climate emergency;

·    acknowledges emergency action is needed by all levels of government; and

·    commits to strong action.

4          As also outlined in the proposal, the term climate emergency “recognises that the Earth has reached key climate tipping points and that incremental action (i.e. gradual reduction of emissions over several decades) is no longer a reasonable course of action if we want a future for ourselves and our children.”

5          Such a declaration is seen by its proponents as urging global action to: move to negative and zero emissions as soon as possible; draw down excess greenhouse gases on an ‘industrial’ scale; and place a priority focus on strategies that create cooling.

Proposed motion to declare a climate emergency

6          The requested wording for the Council motion to declare a climate emergency is as follows:

7          “Council acknowledges:

a)        the climate emergency;

b)        that all levels of government need to act;

c)         that business as usual transition is not fast enough; and

d)        calls for fast action (10 years or less) to reach negative emissions.

Develop a Climate Emergency Plan that:

e)         Sets a target of net negative emissions in an emergency timeframe (10 years);

f)         Quantify what Council can do towards reaching the target;

g)        Identify what the community can do toward reaching the target;

h)        Identify what the community can do toward reaching the target; and

i)          Identify what local and central government will need to do for the target to be achieved.

Ensure governance prioritises the response.

Build the capacity of staff around the climate emergency and help them understand the ‘why’ and the ‘how’.

Continue to communicate the climate emergency and engage the community so the community can support entry to emergency mode.”

DISCUSSION

Council’s response to climate change

8          The DCC has been working explicitly on understanding, mitigating and adapting to the impacts of climate change since around 2006. The focus of this work has primarily been strategic direction setting, early stage and high-level planning, and data collection and monitoring. Critical action has also begun, such as the asset renewal of the street lighting making use of LED technology to reduce emissions and the increased investment to provide active transport options. Key elements of the work to date include:

a)         A goal of Dunedin being net zero carbon by 2050 was embedded in the city’s strategic framework through inclusion in Te Ao Tūroa – The Natural World (Dunedin’s environment strategy).

b)        Climate change projections are now included in the Significant Forecasting Assumptions for the 10 year plan.

c)         Participation in the international Covenant of Mayors, including identifying the city’s carbon footprint, assessing climate risk and vulnerability, setting carbon reduction targets and developing an action plan to drive mitigation and adaptation (note, this is currently underway).

d)        Organisational annual carbon footprint monitoring through the Certified Emissions Management and Reduction Scheme (CEMARS).

e)        Responding to climate change impacts – this has been focused on South Dunedin and significantly on short-term interventions that alleviate flooding, although more far-reaching work to develop a forward-looking programme for adaptation in the medium to long-term for South Dunedin and the wider city is also being actively pursued.

9          Noting the work to date, it is recommended that instead of developing a Climate Emergency Plan, the components of such a plan are included in existing DCC plans in this space, in particular in the Covenant of Mayors action plan that is currently being progressed.

Strong focus on climate resilience

10        As part of the 2019/20 Annual Plan Deliberations, the Council approved $525,000 in 2019/20 and $572,000 in 2020/21 to establish a Climate Resilience Work Programme.  This work will progress delivering on the Council’s commitments in the climate change space through: enabling more climate resilient decision-making; improving climate information and risk disclosure and reporting; establishing and delivering a programme of climate resilience projects; and, building climate leadership through capacity building and funding.

11        As part of these Deliberations, Council also resolved to form a climate change governance advisory group, further signalling the Council’s intent to deliver on its climate change commitments.

Advantages and disadvantages of supporting a climate emergency declaration

12        Christchurch City Council (CCC) recently resolved to declaring a climate emergency (Attachment B is the CCC’s background briefing note). Christchurch has made a range of highly similar climate change commitments to Dunedin, such as the Covenant of Mayors. As a result, many of the advantages and disadvantages outlined by CCC have application to Dunedin.

13        Key advantages of a declaration include: raising awareness about climate impacts; increasing recognition of the extent and speed of change needed to adequately address climate change; a greater focus on climate change actions; and, potentially, a greater mobilisation of resources.

14        Key disadvantages of a declaration include raising community concern at a time when Dunedin has already experienced recent flood emergencies and severe weather events; uncertainty about what declaring an emergency would mean; and level of preparedness for Dunedin to act at the scale that a declaration of emergency may expect. These disadvantages could undermine the level of engagement and support from the community.

15        Auckland City Council (ACC) also recently considered the declaration of a climate emergency (Attachment C is the ACC’s background briefing note).

OPTIONS

Option One – Supports declaring a climate emergency in Dunedin

16        This option supports a climate emergency declaration while acknowledging work Council has progressed to date in response to climate change, and noting that the elements of a Climate Emergency Plan as listed in the declaration would be progressed through the existing initiatives and plans Council has for mitigation and adaptation.

Advantages

·        Raises awareness about climate impacts in Dunedin.

·        Increases recognition of the extent and speed of change needed to adequately address climate change.

·        Highlights greater focus on climate change actions.

·        Potentially creates a greater mobilisation of resources, in particular, among community groups, non-government and private sector stakeholders.

Disadvantages

·        Raises community concern around emergencies at a time of recent flooding and severe weather events.

·        Commits Council at a time when work is already underway to respond, adapt to and mitigate climate change in Dunedin.

·        Could undermine the level of engagement and support from the community to date on existing initiatives.

Option Two – Does not support declaring a climate emergency in Dunedin at this time (Status Quo)

17        Council does not support the declaration of a climate emergency.

Advantages

·        Highlights existing initiatives already in place.

·        Reduces confusion around ‘emergencies’, in particular, severe weather events and natural disasters.

Disadvantages

·        Reduces the opportunity to raise awareness on climate change, and generate support from community groups, and non-government and private sector stakeholders.

NEXT STEPS

18        If Option One is chosen, staff will ensure the climate emergency declaration is appropriately reflected in current and future communications and work programmes.

 

Signatories

Author:

Sean Jacobs - Senior Policy Analyst

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

Proposal Declaring a Climate Emergency in Dunedin

2

b

Christchurch City Council - Background Briefing on Declaring a Climate Emergency

2

c

Auckland City Council - Background Briefing on Declaring a Climate Emergency

2

 

SUMMARY OF CONSIDERATIONS

 

Fit with purpose of Local Government

This decision promotes the environmental well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

Fit with strategic framework

 

Contributes

Detracts

Not applicable

Social Wellbeing Strategy

Economic Development Strategy

Environment Strategy

Arts and Culture Strategy

3 Waters Strategy

Spatial Plan

Integrated Transport Strategy

Parks and Recreation Strategy

Other strategic projects/policies/plans

While there is no immediate impact to the strategic framework, future strategic documents will include the climate declaration and associated work to reduce emissions.

Māori Impact Statement

There are no known impacts for tangata whenua.

Sustainability

A climate emergency declaration would strongly highlight Council’s commitment to sustainability.

LTP/Annual Plan / Financial Strategy /Infrastructure Strategy

There are no immediate implications for the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan, Financial Strategy and Infrastructure Strategy beyond the existing climate change-related commitments in these documents.

Financial considerations

There are no known immediate financial implications.

Significance

While a statement of emergency provokes public interest, this decision is considered low in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy as it has no immediate planning or legislative complications.

Engagement – external

Mr Rory McCarthy addressed Council on 28 May 2019.

Engagement - internal

CEO/Corporate Communications

Risks: Legal / Health and Safety etc.

There are no known health and safety, or immediate legal risks.

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest.

Community Boards

There are no implications for Community Boards.

 

 


Council

25 June 2019

 

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Council

25 June 2019

 

 

LGNZ Annual General Meeting Remits and Rules

Department: Civic

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          The Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) 2019 Annual General Meeting (AGM) is to be held on Sunday 7 July 2019, in Wellington. 

2          At that meeting, consideration will be given to 24 remits that have been submitted by local authorities, have received either formal support from five councils, or support from at least one zone or sector group meeting prior to being submitted, and have been screened through the LGNZ Remits Screening Policy.  The DCC delegate will vote on DCC’s behalf on each. 

3          LGNZ is also proposing four changes to the LGNZ Rules, for consideration at the AGM. 

4          The purpose of this report is to present the remits that are going to the LGNZ AGM, along with the proposed changes to the LGNZ Rules.  It asks that Council give consideration as to whether it wishes to give pre-conference direction to the voting delegate about DCC’s support or otherwise of any of these remits and proposed rule changes. 

5          As this is an administration report, there are no options or summary of considerations. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Decides for each of the remits presented at the Local Government New Zealand Annual General Meeting, whether Council wishes to determine DCC’s voting position for action by the delegate attending the Annual General Meeting.

b)     Decides for each of the proposed changes to the LGNZ Rules, whether Council wishes to determine DCC’s voting position for action by the delegate attending the Annual General Meeting.

 

BACKGROUND

6          LGNZ has a Remits Screening Policy which determines which remits submitted by local authorities will be considered at the LGNZ AGM.  This year, 24 remits have been accepted for consideration.  Attachment A provides the details of each of those remits.

7          Since late 2018 LGNZ has consulted with members on options for changing the LGNZ Rules at Zone and Sector meetings.  Attachment B provides an introduction to the changes, and Attachment C provides the detailed changes.

8          As agreed to at the Council meeting on 28 May 2019, Councillors Staynes, Hawkins and Garey will attend the AGM on behalf of Council. 

DISCUSSION

9          The DCC delegates attending the LGNZ AGM will have the opportunity to vote on the remits.  So that they can represent the position of Council, consideration needs to be given to each remit, and a decision made for each on whether council supports the remit proposed.  Council may decide that it does not have a position on a remit, and that the delegates may make a decision at the meeting following discussion on the particular matter.   It is important to note that councils speak to their remits, so delegates at the conference may be in a more informed voting position than councillors are prior to the AGM.

10        A summary of each of the remits to be considered at the LGNZ AGM is presented below:

Remit 1 – Climate change – local government representation

That LGNZ calls on the Government to include local government representation (as determined by local government) at all levels of policy development, technical risk and resilience assessment, and data acquisition on climate change response policies – with an emphasis on climate adaptation: policy; legal; planning; and financial compensation regimes.

Remit 2 – Fireworks

That LGNZ work with central government to raise the sale of fireworks issue and advocate for legislative change.

Remit 3 – Traffic offences – red light running

That LGNZ request the Government to bring into line camera and officer-detected red light running offences with other traffic offences that incur demerit points.

Remit 4 – Prohibit parking on grass berms

To seek an amendment to clause 6.2 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004 to prohibit parking on urban berms.

Remit 5 – Short-term guest accommodation

That LGNZ advocates for enabling legislation that would allow councils to require all guest accommodation providers to register with the council and that provides an efficient approach to imposing punitive action on operators who don’t comply.

Remit 6 – Nitrate in drinking water

That LGNZ recommend to the Government the funding of additional research into the effects of nitrates in drinking water on human health, and/or partner with international public health organisations to promote such research, in order to determine whether the current drinking water standard for nitrate is still appropriate for the protection of human health.


 

 

Remit 7 – Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act (1987)

That LGNZ initiates a review of Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act (1987) (LGOIMA) request management nationally with a view to establishing clear and descriptive reporting for and by local authorities that will create a sector-wide picture of:

·    Trends in the volume and nature of LGOIMA requests over time.

·    Trends in users.

·    The impacts of technology in terms of accessing information sought and the amount of information now held by local authorities (and able to be requested).

·    The financial and resource impacts on local authorities in managing the LGOIMA function.

 

That LGNZ use the data obtained to:

·    Identify opportunities to streamline or simplify LGOIMA processes.

·    Share best practice between local authorities.

·    Assess the value of a common national local government framework of practice for LGOIMA requests.

·    Identify opportunities to advocate for legislation changes on behalf of the sector (where these are indicated).

Remit 8 – Weed control

That LGNZ encourages member councils to consider using environmentally friendly weed control methods.

Remit 9 – Building defects claims

LGNZ calls on central government to take action as recommended by the Law Commission in its 2014 report on “Liability of Multiple Defendants” to introduce a cap on the liability of councils in New Zealand in relation to building defects claims whilst joint and several liability applies.

Remit 10 – Social housing

That LGNZ, in conjunction with central government, urgently focus on the development and implementation of a broader range of funding and financing tools in respect of community/social housing provision, than those which currently exist in the housing needs space. These should include funding to support the operation, upgrade and growth of council housing portfolios and, where a council chooses, access to Income Related Rents for eligible tenants.

Remit 11 - Procurement

That LGNZ investigate the ability of the sector to collaborate in procuring open-source designs and plans for bulk infrastructure that are largely similar, with an initial approach to look at water and wastewater treatment facilities.

Remit 12 – Single use polystyrene

That LGNZ advocates to the Government to phase out single use polystyrene.

Remit 13 – Local Government Act 2002

That LGNZ pursue an amendment to the Local Government Act 2002 to:

a)    Re-number sub-sections 181 (5) and (6) to sub-sections (6) and (7); and

b)   Introduce a new sub-section (5) to read: For all purposes the term “any work” in subsection 4 means any works constructed before xx Month 20xx; and includes any works that were wholly or partly in existence, or work on the construction of which commenced, before xx Month 20xx.

Remit 14 – Campground regulations

That LGNZ request the Government to amend the Camping - Ground Regulations to allow councils to approve remote camp facilities on private property, subject to any such conditions as deemed required by a council, including the condition that any approved campground is x distance away from an existing campground, unless the existing campground operator agrees to waive this condition in writing.

Remit 15 – Living wage

Wellington City Council asks that LGNZ members consider engaging with the Living Wage Aotearoa New Zealand Movement when developing policies on payment of the Living Wage.

Remit 16 – Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act

LGNZ, on behalf of its member councils ask for a review of the effectiveness of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 in reducing alcohol harm (e.g. price, advertising, purchase age and availability) and fully involve local government in that review.

Remit 17 – Greenhouse gases

Wellington City Council asks that LGNZ members collectively adopt the position that government should revise the Resource Management Act 1991 to adequately consider the impact of greenhouse gases when making decisions under that law and to ensure that the Resource Management Act 1991 is consistent with the Zero Carbon Bill.

Remit 18 – Climate change – policy framework

That LGNZ recommends to government that they establish an independent expert group to develop a new policy framework for adapting to climate change impacts as recommended by the Climate Change Adaptation Technical Working Group (CCATWG). This new expert group would be supported by a secretariat and stakeholder advisory group.

Remit 19 – Road safety

1.    That LGNZ acknowledges that the New Zealand Transport Agency's (NZTA's), Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM) is a comprehensive and robust document, and that NZTA ensures the CoPTTM system is regularly reviewed, refined and updated. However, in light of the recent road worker fatalities LGNZ requests NZTA, in partnership with Road Controlling Authorities (RCAs);

a)    Review afresh its Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM} to satisfy themselves that;

i.      The document provides sufficient guidelines and procedures to ensure approaching traffic are given every possible opportunity to become aware of the worksite ahead and to respond appropriately and in a timely manner.

b)    Review its CoPTTM Training System to ensure;

i.      Trainers are sufficiently qualified and adequately covering the training syllabus.

ii.     Site Traffic Management Supervisors (STMS's) and Traffic Controllers (TC's) are only certified when they can demonstrate competence in the application of CoPTTM.

iii.    A robust refresher programme is in place to ensure those in charge of Traffic Management on worksites remain current in the required competencies.

c)    Review its Site Auditing requirements to ensure the traffic management at worksites is independently audited at a sufficient frequency to ensure compliance, and that a significantly robust system is put in place to enable enforcement of compliance.

 

2.    That LGNZ takes steps to remind its members of their duties with respect to their role as Road Controlling Authorities including;

a)         Appointing and sufficiently training and resourcing a Traffic Management Coordinator to ensure their obligations under the Health and Safety Work Act 2015, with respect to traffic management, are being met.

b)        Adequately resourcing and undertaking audits of road work sites to ensure compliance with CoPTTM.

Remit 20 – Mobility scooter safety

That LGNZ requests that government investigate the introduction of strengthened rules to govern the safe use of mobility scooters, particularly in relation to speed limits and registration.

Remit 21 – Museums and galleries

That central government funding be made available on an annual basis for museums and galleries operated by territorial authorities with nationally significant collections.

Remit 22 – Resource Management Act

That the selection of all independent commissioners for Resource Management Act hearings be centralised to improve independence and enhance the quality of decisions.

Remit 23 – Mayor decision to appoint Deputy Mayor

That LGNZ request the Government to amend S.41A of the LGA2002 to give Mayors the same powers to appoint a deputy mayor as held by the Mayor of Auckland.


 

 

Remit 24 – Beauty industry

That LGNZ calls on the Government to develop and implement national guidelines, policy or regulations to achieve national consistency for the largely unregulated ‘health and beauty clinic’ industry.

11        A summary of the four proposed LGNZ Rule changes is provided below:

Proposal One – Amendments to provide Te Maruata representation on National Council (including consequential amendments)

To reflect the increasing diversity of the local government family/whanau it is proposed that the Rules be amended to provide that the Chair of Te Maruata is a member of National Council, with full voting rights.

Proposal Two – Amendments to give effect to Auckland Council representation on National Council (including consequential amendments)

It is proposed that the Rules be amended to provide that Auckland Council has three seats on National Council, to be held by:

·    The Mayor of Auckland (or an alternate member of the Auckland Council governing body appointed by the Mayor);

·    A member of the Auckland Council governing body; and

·    A member of an Auckland Council local board.

Proposal Three – Minor (administrative) substantive changes

A number of minor administrative changes to the Rules are proposed, including:

·    Inclusion of community board members in the definition of Elected Member;

·    The ability for National Council to appoint individuals (with full speaking rights, but no voting rights) to the National Council to provide assistance to National Council because of their training, qualifications or experience; and to ensure diversity of representation;

·    Changes to the definition of a quorum for the purpose of National Council meetings; and

·    The ability for National Council to pass a resolution without a meeting with the agreement of 75 per cent of all National Council members (as opposed to all National Council members, as currently required).

Proposal Four – Minor amendments to modernise and rationalise language

LGNZ is proposing that a number of changes be made to modernise the Rules (e.g. to make provision for electronic notices and voting) and rationalise the language of the Rules.  These changes are technical in nature, and do not result in any substantive changes to the Rules.

OPTIONS

12        There are no options for this report. 

NEXT STEPS

13        The DCC delegates at the LGNZ AGM will vote on the remits and proposed rule changes in accordance with the decisions made. 

 

Signatories

Author:

Sharon Bodeker - Team Leader Civic

Authoriser:

Sue Bidrose - Chief Executive Officer

Attachments

 

Title

Page

a

2019 LGNZ Annual General Meeting Remits (Under Separate Cover)

2

b

Introduction to the Proposed Rule Changes

2

c

Proposed Rule Changes

 

  


Council

25 June 2019

 

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25 June 2019

 

 

Waipori Fund Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives - Review

Department: Finance

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1          Council has an approved Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives (“SIPO”) for its Waipori Fund.

2          The SIPO was last reviewed in August 2016 and is required to be reviewed every three years.

3          The purpose of this report is to present to Council a revised SIP for its approval.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

That the Council:

a)     Approves/amends the revised “Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives” for the Waipori Fund.

 

BACKGROUND

4          The purpose of the SIPO is “to provide all parties involved in the investment management of the Fund with clear guidance on how the assets of the Fund are to be managed”.

5          The proposed changes clarify a number of areas of the SIPO and are summarised below.

DISCUSSION